Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use eval() in my current project like this:

if (class_exists($class_name)) //$class_name depends on user input
    eval($class_name.'::MyStaticMethod()');

eval() is executed if and only if class with the name $class_name exists so it's kinda safe, but I still don't think that this is the best solution.

Can I do the same what code above does without eval()?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I have recently answered this question. The last part of my answer perfectly answers this question and is much more useful for future readers than answers provided here. That's why I am answering my own question.

PHP has features that gives possibility to avoid using eval in most cases:

  1. PHP is very dynamic language. It has ability to do following stuff with strings:

    • Define and/or get variable (supported from PHP 4.3). For example:

      $variableName = 'MyVariable';
      // Create new variable with the name defined in variable $variableName
      ${$variableName} = 'MyValue';
      //Outputs: string(7) "MyValue"
      var_dump($MyVariable);
      //Outputs: string(7) "MyValue"
      var_dump(${'MyVariable'});
      

      Demo

    • Call function (supported from PHP 4.3). For example:

      // Create function with the name defined in variable $functionName
      function MyFunction($argument) {
          return 'Argument passed is: '.$argument;
      }
      
      $functionName = 'MyFunction';
      
      // Outputs:
      // string(48) "Argument passed is: Calling MyFunction directly."
      var_dump(MyFunction('Calling MyFunction directly.'));
      // Outputs:
      // string(51) "Argument passed is: Calling MyFunction with string."
      var_dump($functionName('Calling MyFunction with string.'));
      

      Demo

    • Create instance of class (supported from PHP 5.0). For example:

      class MyClass {
          public function __construct() {
              echo 'Constructing MyClass'."\n";
          }
      }
      
      $className = 'MyClass';
      
      $objFromString = new $className();
      // Outputs: object(MyClass)#1 (0) {}
      var_dump($objFromString);
      

      Demo

    • Call static method (supported from PHP 5.0). For example:

      class MyClass {
          public static function staticMethod() {
              return 'MyClass::staticMethod called';
          }
      }
      
      $staticMethodName = 'staticMethod';
      // Outputs: string(28) "MyClass::staticMethod called"
      var_dump(MyClass::$staticMethodName());
      

      Demo

      And from PHP 5.3 class name can also be defined by string. Example:

      class MyClass {
          public static function staticMethod() {
          return 'MyClass::staticMethod called';
          }
      }
      
      $className = 'MyClass';
      $staticMethodName = 'staticMethod';
      
      var_dump($className::$staticMethodName());
      var_dump($className::staticMethod());
      

      Demo

    • Call instance method of object (supported from PHP 5.0). For example:

      class MyClass {
          public function instanceMethod() {
              return 'MyClass::instanceMethod called';
          }
      }
      
      $methodName = 'instanceMethod';
      
      $obj = new MyClass();
      // Outputs: string(30) "MyClass::instanceMethod called"
      var_dump($obj->$methodName());
      

      Demo

    • Access static and instance properties of object (supported from PHP 5.0). For example:

      class MyClass {
          public static $myStaticProperty;
          public $myInstanceProperty;
      }
      
      $staticPropertyName = 'myStaticProperty';
      $instancePropertyName = 'myInstanceProperty';
      
      MyClass::${$staticPropertyName} = 'my static value';
      $obj = new MyClass();
      $obj->{$instancePropertyName} = 'my instance value';
      
      var_dump(MyClass::${$staticPropertyName});
      var_dump($obj->{$instancePropertyName});
      

      Demo

  2. PHP has two functions: call_user_func and call_user_func_array for dynamic function/method calls. Both are perfectly documented so I won't go in details here.
  3. Even if everything above is not enough PHP 5 comes with great Reflection API. Unfortunately, documentation has few examples but reflection is quite large topic to cover here. Basically, It's not a big deal to use reflection after reading how it works.
share|improve this answer

yes:

call_user_func(array($class_name, 'MyStaticMethod'));
share|improve this answer

I'd suggest call_user_func.

An alternative would be calling it like this:

$class_and_method = "Class::MyStaticMethod()";
$class_and_method();
share|improve this answer

As of PHP 5.3+,

$class_name::MyStaticMethod();
share|improve this answer

Adisory: userinput + eval = security hole;

Also eval creates another php process. You don't want another process for every little tidbit of code. Use eval if you have something for it to chew on.

Also as of php 5.4

$method = array('class_name', 'method_name');
$method(); // calls class_name::method_name()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.