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I found following few lines of code in .bashrc in my linux instance. could sombody explain me what does this line of codes means. i have no background in shell programming.

if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
        . ~/.bashrc
fi

thanks in advance for any help

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2  
If that code is in your ~/.bashrc, remove it: bash is already reading your bashrc file. If it's in your ~/.profile or ~/.bash_profile, leave it, it's fine. –  glenn jackman May 20 '12 at 11:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

[ -f ~/.bashrc] tests wheather a file .bashrc exists in the current home directory. If it exists, then it's sourced.

That means it is executed in the current shell, not by starting a new shell. So all changes in the script affect the current shell directly without having to export variables.

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. ~/.bashrc are you sure this will run the bashrc file? ~/.bashrc will do his work. –  mawia May 20 '12 at 13:21
1  
simply executing ~/.bashrc executes the file in a new shell, changes you make to the environment variable won't affect the old shell. . ./.bashrc executs the script in the current shell and is used to set up the environment. if you want to try it, put echo something in your .bashrc and start a new shell. –  mata May 20 '12 at 14:54
    
Thanks! got your point!though in between can you explain your suggestion... –  mawia May 20 '12 at 15:27
    
You mean inserting an echo into bashrc? It's just so you see that the script gets executed when you start a new bash session. –  mata May 20 '12 at 15:41

Well, it is the if condition statement in shell script programming language. if [-f ~/.bashrc] means that if it is true that there is a file named .bashrc in your home directory, then when you login your linux system the ./bashrc file will be run automatic by the init process. It is used to configure the system environment for you automatic.

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