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What is the best way of parsing ERF (endace) capture files in python? I found a libpcap wrapper for python but I do not think that lipcap supports ERF format.

Thanks!

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Maybe not what you ask for but you can easily capture packets using the DAG API and use libpcap to store the trace in pcap-format. EDIT: and you can use dagconvert to convert ERF to pcap. –  ext May 21 '12 at 10:20
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2 Answers 2

Here's a simplistic ERF record parser which returns a dict per packet (I just hacked it together, so not extremely well tested. Not all flag fields are decoded, but the ones that aren't, aren't widely applicable):

NB:

  • ERF record types: 1 = HDLC, 2 = Ethernet, 3 = ATM, 4 = Reassembled AAL5, 5-7 multichannel variants with extra headers not processed here.
  • rlen can be less than wlen+len(header) if the snaplength is too short.
  • The interstitial loss counter is the number of packets lost between this packet and the previous captured packet as noted by the Dag packet processor when its input queue overflows.
  • Comment out the two scapy lines if you don't want to use scapy.

Code:

import scapy.layers.all as sl

def erf_records( f ):
    """
    Generator which parses ERF records from file-like ``f``
    """
    while True:
        # The ERF header is fixed length 16 bytes
        hdr = f.read( 16 )
        if hdr:
            rec = {}
            # The timestamp is in Intel byte-order
            rec['ts'] = struct.unpack( '<Q', hdr[:8] )[0]
            # The rest is in network byte-order
            rec.update( zip( ('type',  # ERF record type
                              'flags', # Raw flags bit field
                              'rlen',  # Length of entire record
                              'lctr',  # Interstitial loss counter
                              'wlen'), # Length of packet on wire
                             struct.unpack( '>BBHHH', hdr[8:] ) ) )
            rec['iface']  = rec['flags'] & 0x03
            rec['rx_err'] = rec['flags'] & 0x10 != 0
            rec['pkt'] = f.read( rec['rlen'] - 16 )
            if rec['type'] == 2:
                # ERF Ethernet has an extra two bytes of pad between ERF header
                # and beginning of MAC header so that IP-layer data are DWORD
                # aligned.  From memory, none of the other types have pad.
                rec['pkt'] = rec['pkt'][2:]
                rec['pkt'] = sl.Ether( rec['pkt'] )
            yield rec
        else:
            return
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ERF records can contain optional Extension Headers which are appended to the 16 byte ERF record header. The high bit of the 'type' field indicates the presence of an Extension Header. I've added a test for the Extension Header to strix's example, along with a decode of the Extension Header itself. Note that the test for an Ethernet frame also needs to change slightly if an Extension Header is present.

Caveat: I believe that ERF records can contain multiple Extensions Headers, but I don't know to test for these. The Extension Header structure is not particularly well documented and the only records I have in captivity just contain a single extension.

import struct
import scapy.layers.all as sl

def erf_records( f ):
    """
    Generator which parses ERF records from file-like ``f``
    """
    while True:
        # The ERF header is fixed length 16 bytes
        hdr = f.read( 16 )
        if hdr:
            rec = {}
            # The timestamp is in Intel byte-order
            rec['ts'] = struct.unpack( '<Q', hdr[:8] )[0]
            # The rest is in network byte-order
            rec.update( zip( ('type',  # ERF record type
                              'flags', # Raw flags bit field
                              'rlen',  # Length of entire record
                              'lctr',  # Interstitial loss counter
                              'wlen'), # Length of packet on wire
                             struct.unpack( '>BBHHH', hdr[8:] ) ) )
            rec['iface']  = rec['flags'] & 0x03
            rec['rx_err'] = rec['flags'] & 0x10 != 0

            #- Check if ERF Extension Header present.  
            #  Each Extension Header is 8 bytes.
            if rec['type'] & 0x80:
                ext_hdr = f.read( 8 )
                rec.update( zip( (
                        'ext_hdr_signature',     # 1 byte
                        'ext_hdr_payload_hash',  # 3 bytes
                        'ext_hdr_filter_color',  # 1 bye
                        'ext_hdr_flow_hash'),    # 3 bytes
                        struct.unpack( '>B3sB3s', ext_hdr ) ) )
                #- get remaining payload, less ext_hdr
                rec['pkt'] = f.read( rec['rlen'] - 24 )
            else:
                rec['pkt'] = f.read( rec['rlen'] - 16 )
            if rec['type'] & 0x02:
                # ERF Ethernet has an extra two bytes of pad between ERF header
                # and beginning of MAC header so that IP-layer data are DWORD
                # aligned.  From memory, none of the other types have pad.
                rec['pkt'] = rec['pkt'][2:]
                rec['pkt'] = sl.Ether( rec['pkt'] )
            yield rec
        else:
            return
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