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I try to implement Unit of Work pattern in my application with use of nested units of work.

I have the following interfaces:

interface IDataService
{
  IUnitOfWork NewUnitOfWork();
  INestedUnitOfWork NewNestedUnitOfWork(IUnitOfWork parent);
}

interface IUnitOfWork : IDisposable
{
  void Commit();
}

interface INestedUnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
{
  IUnitOfWork Parent { get; }
  object GetParentObject(object obj);   // get the same object in parent uow
  object GetNestedObject(object obj);   // get the same object in this uow
}

This is almost how things happen in XPO.

Is there any chance to implement these interfaces using Entity Framework, suppose version 4, with little pain?

I use auto-generated entity objects, not POCO.

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1  
When you try to do cool things with Entity Framework, you're going to have a bad time (why is switched to Lightspeed). You would need to look at current implementation of Unit Of Work with EF and determine how to implement nesting. Some great code here code.google.com/p/ef4prs/source/browse/trunk/… –  Jeremy Child May 20 '12 at 21:42
    
Well, I tried transactions, but they do not revert object context changes on rollback. So, I still cannot determine how to implement nesting. –  Dmitry Polomoshnov May 21 '12 at 11:47

1 Answer 1

Not exactly your way, because I'm using POCO with state flags, but it can be applied to generated entities as well. This is a recursive approach to manage the state of the parent entity and children entities. This is the state manager class for the Parent entity:

public partial class ParentStateManager : IStateManager<Parent, MyObjContext>
{

    private IStateManager<Child, MyObjContext> _ChildStateManager = new ChildStateManager();
    public void ChangeState(Parent m, MyObjContext ctx)
    {
        if (m == null) return;
        ctx.Parents.Attach(m);
        if (m.IsDeleted)
        {
            ctx.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(m, System.Data.EntityState.Deleted);
        }
        else
        {
            if (m.IsNew)
            {
                ctx.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(m, System.Data.EntityState.Added);
            }
            else
            {
                if (m.IsDirty)
                {
                    ctx.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(m, System.Data.EntityState.Modified);
                }
            }
        }
        SetRelationsState(m, ctx);
    }
    private void SetRelationsState(Parent m, MyObjContext ctx)
    {
        foreach (Child varChild in m.Children.Where(p => !p.IsDeleted))
        {
            _ChildStateManager.ChangeState(varChild, ctx);
        }
        while (m.Children.Where(p => p.IsDeleted).Any())
        {
            _ChildStateManager.ChangeState(m.Children.Where(p => p.IsDeleted).LastOrDefault(), ctx);
        }
    }
}

And this is the state manager for the Child entity:

public partial class ChildStateManager : IStateManager<Child, MyObjContext>
{

    public void ChangeState(Child m, MyObjContext ctx)
    {
        if (m == null) return;
        ctx.Children.Attach(m);
        if (m.IsDeleted)
        {
            ctx.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(m, System.Data.EntityState.Deleted);
        }
        else
        {
            if (m.IsNew)
            {
                ctx.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(m, System.Data.EntityState.Added);
            }
            else
            {
                if (m.IsDirty)
                {
                    ctx.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(m, System.Data.EntityState.Modified);
                }
            }
        }
        SetRelationsState(m, ctx);
    }
    private void SetRelationsState(Child m, MyObjContext ctx)
    {
    }
}

IStateManager is a simple interface which only has ChangeState method. If the Child entity had a GrandChild collection, the ChildStateManager.SetRelationsState() method would call the GrandChildStateManager.ChangeState() and so on. It's a bit complicated, but it works for me and I generate the state manager code using T4 templates.

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1  
Nice approach @dradu –  Jeremy Child May 21 '12 at 21:38
    
@dradu: Sorry, I can't see how this can help me in scenario where I, for instance: 1) select some Parent object in newly created session, 2) make some updates on its primitive properties, 3) make some changes to children with ability to cancel them, if requested 4) save changes (not canceled) –  Dmitry Polomoshnov May 22 '12 at 0:14
    
Sorry for not being of much help. I am not sure about this concept of nested units of work. Usually your EF context implements an unit of work interface. The UoW is passed to one or more repositories which perform updates to the corresponding entities. At the end, the UoW commits the changes or rolls back everything, if any error occurs. You said "make some changes to children with ability to cancel them, if requested", but when should this occur? –  dan radu May 22 '12 at 0:40
    
@dradu: Imagine a form where I edit complex object. It has collection of child objects. Each child object has its child collection of other objects. I want to display sub-records in readonly mode and edit them in another form. I can hold copies of all values in my viewmodel, but it becomes to complex when there is more than 2 levels of nesting. The requirement is to be able to cancel changes at any level, including changes made in children. I thought nesting approach would help me much. –  Dmitry Polomoshnov May 25 '12 at 9:51

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