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I was at a lecture with Bjarne Stoustrup recently, he was talking about c++ 11 and why it made sense.

One of his examples of new awesomeness was the news '&&' symbol for move constructors.

Then I want home and started thinking, "When would I ever need such a thing?".

My first example was the code below:

class Number {
private:
    int value;
public:
    Number(const int value) : value(value){
        cout << "Build Constructor on " << value << endl;
    }
    Number(const Number& orig) : value(orig.value){
        cout << "Copy Constructor on " << value << endl;        
    }
    virtual ~Number(){}

    int toInt() const{
        return value;
    }


    friend const Number operator+(const Number& n0, const Number& n1); 
};

const Number operator+(const Number& n0, const Number& n1){
    return  Number(n0.value + n1.value);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    const Number n3 = (Number(2) + Number(1));
    cout << n3.toInt() << endl;
    return 0;
}

This code does exactly what the move constructor is supposed to solve. The n3 variable is constructed from a reference to the value returned from the '+' operator.

Except this is the output from running the code:

Build Constructor on 1
Build Constructor on 2
Build Constructor on 3
3

RUN SUCCESSFUL 

What the output shows is that the copy constructor never gets called -- and this is with optimizations turned off. I'm having a hard time twisting the arm of the code enough to make it run the copy construtor. wrapping the result in a std::pair did the trick, but it kept me thinking.

Is the argument of move-constructors in operator arithmetic's actually a failed argument?

Why is'nt my copy constructor called and why is it called in :

using namespace std;

class Number {
private:
    int value;
public:
    Number(const int value) : value(value){
        cout << "Build Constructor on " << value << endl;
    }
    Number(const Number& orig) : value(orig.value){
        cout << "Copy Constructor on " << value << endl;        
    }
    virtual ~Number(){}

    int toInt() const{
        return value;
    }


    friend const std::pair<const Number, const Number> operator+(const Number& n0, const Number& n1); 
};

const std::pair<const Number, const Number> operator+(const Number& n0, const Number& n1){
    return  make_pair(Number(n0.value + n1.value), n0);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    const Number n3 = (Number(2) + Number(1)).first;
    cout << n3.toInt() << endl;
    return 0;
}

With output:

Build Constructor on 1
Build Constructor on 2
Copy Constructor on 2
Build Constructor on 3
Copy Constructor on 3
Copy Constructor on 2
Copy Constructor on 3
Copy Constructor on 2
Copy Constructor on 3
3

RUN SUCCESSFUL 

I would like to know what the logic is and why the pair operator basically screws up the performance?

update:

I did another modification and found that if I replaced make_pair with the actual templated constructor of the pair pair<const Number, const Number> this reduced the number of times the copy constructor got fired:

class Number {
private:
    int value;
public:
    Number(const int value) : value(value){
        cout << "Build Constructor on " << value << endl;
    }
    Number(const Number& orig) : value(orig.value){
        cout << "Copy Constructor on " << value << endl;        
    }
    virtual ~Number(){}

    int toInt() const{
        return value;
    }


    friend const std::pair<const Number, const Number> operator+(const Number& n0, const Number& n1); 
};



const std::pair<const Number, const Number> operator+(const Number& n0, const Number& n1){
    return  std::pair<const Number, const Number>(Number(n0.value + n1.value), n0);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    const Number n3 = (Number(2) + Number(1)).first;
    cout << n3.toInt() << endl;
    return 0;
}

output :

Build Constructor on 1
Build Constructor on 2
Build Constructor on 3
Copy Constructor on 3
Copy Constructor on 2
Copy Constructor on 3
3

RUN SUCCESSFUL

So it would apear using make_pair is harmfull?

share|improve this question
2  
A move constructor only makes sense for classes that manage external data. The content of the object data itself always gets copied, one way or another. –  Kerrek SB May 20 '12 at 10:59
2  
@MartinKristiansen: No. Objects contained in objects are part of the larger object. I'm talking about objects that have resource handles (like pointers) and non-trivial constructors/destructors that manipulate those resources (like std::vector). Then the move constructor can be used to avoid copying the external resource. –  Kerrek SB May 20 '12 at 11:05
1  
There is a good MSDN example showing when move constructor managing memory allocation really improves the code's performance "How to: Write a Move Constructor" msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd293665 –  SChepurin May 20 '12 at 11:23
3  
@Martin: In what way are they "wierd"? They have value semantics, as they should. Unless you're saying that they should have some ridiculous "clone" method in them to provoke copying, and actual C++ copying would be just pushing references around. Because the former only ends in tears (or a lot of reference counting, then tears when you make a circular reference). –  Nicol Bolas May 20 '12 at 11:36
2  
@Martin: make_pair isn't harmful. The C++ specification allows copy elision; it does not require it. Compilers may elide copies under certain conditions, but they don't have to. Your particular compiler, under your particular compile settings, was able to elide the copy when you were directly constructing the pair, and was not able to when you were returning the value from someone else. Before declaring various bits of the C++ standard library to be "harmful", perhaps you should take the time to familiarize yourself with the standard and how different implementations can implement it. –  Nicol Bolas May 20 '12 at 17:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Consider this simple C++ code:

class StringHolder
{
  std::string member;
public:

  StringHolder(const std::string &newMember) : member(newMember) {}
};

std::string value = "I am a string that will probably be heap-allocated.";
StringHolder hold(value);

After executing the second line, how many copies of the string exist? The answer is two: one stored in value, and one stored in hold. That is fine... sometimes. There will often be times when you want to give someone a copy of a string while keeping it for yourself. But there are times you don't want to do that too. For example:

StringHolder hold("I am a string that will probably be heap-allocated.");

This will create a std::string temporary, which will then be passed to StringHolder's constructor. The constructor will copy-construct its member. After the constructor completes, the temporary will be destroyed. At one point, we had two copies of the string, for no reason whatsoever.

There was no point of having two copies of the string. What we wanted to do was move the std::string parameter into the StringHolder, so that there's only ever one copy of the string.

That's where move construction comes in.

A std::string is basically just a wrapper around a pointer to an allocated array of characters, and a size containing the length of that array (and a capacity, but nevermind that now). If you have a std::string, and you want to move it into the other, then the new string must claim ownership of that allocated array of characters, and the old string must relinquish ownership. In C++03, you could do that with a swap operation:

std::string oldStr = "I am a string that will probably be heap-allocated.";
std::string newStr;
std::swap(newStr, oldStr);

This moves the contents of oldStr into newStr without any memory allocation.

C++11's move syntax provides two important features that std::swap does not.

First, move can happen implicitly (but only when it's safe to do so). You must explicitly call swap if you want swapping; moving can happen by writing natural code. For example, take our StringHolder from before and make one change:

class StringHolder
{
  std::string member;
public:

  StringHolder(std::string newMember) : member(std::move(newMember)) {}
};

StringHolder hold("I am a string that will probably be heap-allocated.");

How many copies of this string are ever created? The answer is... just one: the construction of the temporary. Because it is a temporary, C++11 is smart enough to know that it can move-construct anything being initialized by it. So it move-constructs the value parameter of the StringHolder constructor (or more likely elides the construction altogether). This moves the stored memory from the temporary into newMember. So no copying takes place.

After that, we invoke the move constructor explicitly when we construct member. This again moves the allocated memory from newMember to member.

We only ever allocate a string once. That can be a big savings in performance.

Now, how does this relate to constructors of your own types? Well, consider this code:

class StringHolder
{
  std::string member;
public:

  StringHolder(std::string newMember) : member(std::move(newMember)) {}

  StringHolder(const StringHolder &old) : member(old.member) {}
  StringHolder(StringHolder &&old) : member(std::move(old.member)) {}
};

StringHolder oldHold = std::string("I am a string that will probably be heap-allocated.");
StringHolder newHold(oldHold);

This time, we now have a class with a copy and move constructor. How many copies of the string do we get?

Two. Of course it's two. We have oldHold and newHold, each with a copy of the string.

But, if we did this:

StringHolder oldHold = std::string("I am a string that will probably be heap-allocated.");
StringHolder newHold(std::move(oldHold));

Then there would again only ever be one copy of the string lying around.

That's why movement is important. That's why it matters: it reduces the number of copies of things you may need to have lying around.


Why is'nt my copy constructor called

Your copy constructor wasn't called because it was elided. It's doing return-value optimization. Turning off optimization isn't going to help, because most compilers will elide anyway. There is no reason not to when elision is possible.

For function return values, movement is important in cases where elision is not possible.

share|improve this answer
    
I hate to say, I know that, but I do. My biggest issue was that the reason Stoustrup put forwards for the move constructor was that he wanted to be able to write code like Matrix A = (B*C) + Y; where a matrix might have a big mem-allocation that would have to be copied arround. What I found in my experiments was that this copying never happened. Now you say its because of elision and that makes sense to me. But it sorta makes the whole "its for doing arithmetics" argument void. –  Martin Kristiansen May 20 '12 at 14:23
1  
@Martin: First, Stroustrup is not God; his word is not law for why things are the way they are. For me, this particular use of movement is of little relevance to why we need it. Second, elision is allowed by the spec but not required by it. Therefore, it is perfectly legal for a compiler to not elide the copy/move. So having move support is still a good thing. Third, elision only happens when you're constructing the object. If you're not, if you're reusing some already existing variable, then elision can't help you. –  Nicol Bolas May 20 '12 at 14:32
    
I agree that he is not God. And I see that the move/copy operations make sense when dealing with stuff like the STL. I cannot help but wonder if things like the fact that std::make_pair produces double the constructions and destructions as the version without -- should be reason enough for it to be removed from the STL, but thats an entirely different story. I think you are gonna get the points -- but we will give et a day ;-) –  Martin Kristiansen May 20 '12 at 14:38
3  
His argument is not void, your example is too simple, it does no allocation and only has a single temporary expression which that can easily be elided. The matrix example has two temporary expressions, so not all copies can be elided. The result of (BC) must be calculated, then the result of adding it to Y must be calculated, then that's copied to A and that last copy can be elided but not the result of BC. If you're using GCC you can turn of copy elision with -fno-elide-constructors –  Jonathan Wakely May 20 '12 at 14:55
    
@JonathanWakely: running my code from above on Number(3) + Number(3) + Number(2) + Number(4) still yields no copy's. And for the matrix example I've moved my integer to be a allocated pointer to an int on the heap -- still unable to provoke a copy on the code. :-) –  Martin Kristiansen May 20 '12 at 17:21

It might help to understand the value of move semantics if you overload your operator+ with this one:

Number operator+(Number&& n0, Number&& n1){
  n0.value += n1.value;
  return std::move(n0);
}

This has two important changes:

  • it returns a non-const value
  • it accepts rvalue arguments and modifies one of them instead of creating a new object

This allows your example to avoid one of the "Build Constructor" calls

Build Constructor on 1
Build Constructor on 2
Copy Constructor on 3
3

Now the code creates two new objects and copies one, nstead of creating three new ones, so not a big advantage so far. But if you add a move constructor that can be used instead of the copy:

Number(Number&& orig) : value(orig.value){
  cout << "Move Constructor on " << value << endl;
}

Build Constructor on 1
Build Constructor on 2
Move Constructor on 3
3

If the class allocates memory in the "Build" and "Copy" constructors you have reduced the total number of allocations from three in your original code to two (assuming the move constructor doesn't allocate anything, but takes ownership of the memory that was owned by the object it moves from.)

Now if you change the calculation to:

Number n3 = Number(2) + Number(1) + Number(0);

And compare your original code with the move-enabled version you should see the number of "allocations" reduced from five to three. The more temporaries that are involved the greater the benefit of modifying and moving from temporaries instead of creating new objects. The benefit is not only avoiding copies, but also avoiding creating new resources for new objects, by taking ownership of the resources from existing objects instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I see where you are going, but... your example is a little bizar, you define a operator+ that destroys the state of one of its operants. I'm willing to imagine there are usages like that somewhere in ... I don't know finance? but that sort of code would never be usable? Number one(1); Number three = one + one + one; equals fail? (if the object has external resources?) –  Martin Kristiansen May 21 '12 at 13:26
3  
That's the whole point of rvalues, they bind to temporaries that are going away so it's safe to destructively modify them because noone can tell if an unnamed temporary that was about to disppear gets mutated. Your new example won't fail because one is an lvalue which can't bind to an rvalue reference so that expression calls your original operator+(const Number&, const Number&) overload not my new rvalue overload. Maybe you should actually go and read something about rvalue references. –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 14:06
1  
If you're still unconvinced my "bizarre" example is safe and useful consider that in C++11 std::string has exactly the same operator+ overload taking rvalues and doesn't leak memory if you write s+s+s ... the people designing the language and library might just know what they're doing ;) –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 14:16
    
I did'nt mean to offend you. I will look into that. –  Martin Kristiansen May 21 '12 at 14:44
    
No worries, I'm not offended, but this stuff has many years of expert design behind it, if the reasons and uses for it aren't obvious it's not because it's useless. –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 14:57

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