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I have a list of tuples like

a = [(1, 2), (2, 2), (3, 2)]

the length of this list will vary. The order may also be inverted eg:

a = [(3, 2), (2, 2), (1, 2)]

I also have a list of lists like:

b = [['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0']]

Now I would like to loop over this list of lists and modify items which have the indexes:

b[3][2]
b[2][2]
b[1][2]

So the indexes depend on a. I have tried this:

for item in indexes_list:
    b[item[0]][item[1]] = '1'

But this modifies the whole last column for me (I only want to modify the last 3 items of the last column with the indices given in a). What is the best way to accomplish this?

EDIT: thanks for the responses but they have not worked for me. i have tried both and the same thing happens. i have also made that mistake on indexes_list (it was a typo) because i tried to simplify the problem. i should have elaborated further.

the list of lists is for a tic tac toe board of some sort. i have to test whether a move that is input by the user sandwiches an opponent piece. it doesn't have to be a 3x3 board, therefore long moves are possible so that multiple opponent pieces can be sandwiched. if the move does sandwich an opponent piece, the opponent piece is obliterated, to be replaced by the user piece.

when i try both methods, it quickly does it for the whole column after the first time it goes over the for loop (by putting a breakpoint and debugging, this was detected). here is my prog's code:

    for i, j in (indexes[0])[:len(y_p.rstrip('.'))]:
            print item
            board[i][j] = user
            print board

I used the print statement to see what happens while debugging. User is a variable that holds a str value of the user piece. The rstrip method is used to detect up to where the move should be.

By default, board is:

[['.', '.', '.', '.', '.'], ['.', 'X', 'O', '.', '.'], ['.', 'O', 'X', '.', '.'], ['.', '.', '.', '.', '.'], ['.', '.', '.', '.', '.']]

y_p prints

'.OX.' # board[3][1] + board[2][1] + board[1][1] + board[0][1]

indexes[0] prints

[(3, 1), (2, 1), (1, 1), (0, 1)]

but i only want to do it for

[(3, 1), (2, 1), (1, 1)]

because the board[0][1] coordinate defines an empty space (invalid). The coordinate board[3][1] which is the first in this list is where the user wants to make his move. board[2][1] is an opponent piece and board[1][1] is a user piece. therefore it should turn the pieces defined by the coordinates

[(3, 1), (2, 1), (1, 1)]

to the user's piece. But it does it for these coordinates instead (note that this is a 5x5 board)

[(4,1), (3, 1), (2, 1), (1, 1)]

so even board[4][1] gets modified even though its not in the initial indices list. After executing, board becomes:

[['.', 'X', '.', '.', '.'], ['.', 'X', 'O', '.', '.'], ['.', 'O', 'X', '.', '.'], ['.', 'X', '.', '.', '.'], ['.', 'X', '.', '.', '.']]

which isn't right (the 'X' at the first and last rows shouldn't be there)

share|improve this question
    
"because the board[0][1] coordinate defines an empty space (invalid)." Are you aware that python lists are indexed starting from 0? Index 0 is not invalid. What do you mean by invalid? –  Mark Byers May 20 '12 at 13:35
    
By the way, you seem to be describing the rules of Othello / Reversi. It might be a good idea to mention the name of that game in your question so that people who know the game can understand your question immediately without having to read a long text of you trying to explain it. Also you could use a search engine to find a page that explains the rules with diagrams and link to that page. It would make it easier to understand what you are trying to do if there were diagrams. –  Mark Byers May 20 '12 at 15:07
    
i meant invalid as in a game situation –  user1397215 May 20 '12 at 20:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One problem is that your list of indexes is called a but you refer to indexes_list.

Fix this error and it works: (ideone)

indexes_list = [(3, 2), (2, 2), (1, 2)]
b = [['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0']]

for item in indexes_list:
    b[item[0]][item[1]] = '1'

print b

Result:

[['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '1'], ['0', '0', '1'], ['0', '0', '1']]

Note: before you say "But I tried it and it doesn't work for me", please read the code very carefully and note in particular how b is constructed. The following very similar alternatives do not work because they create a list containing 4 references to the same list.

Wrong way to do it: (ideone)

bb = ['0', '0', '0']
b = [bb, bb, bb, bb]          # Wrong!!!

Another wrong way to do it: (ideone)

b = [['0', '0', '0']] * 4     # Wrong!!!
share|improve this answer
2  
Worth mentioning that you can do b = [[0, 0, 0] for _ in range(4)]. –  lvc May 20 '12 at 12:06
a = [(1, 2), (2, 2), (3, 2)]
b = [['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '0']]
for i, j in a:
    b[i][j] = '1'

print b
[['0', '0', '0'], ['0', '0', '1'], ['0', '0', '1'], ['0', '0', '1']]
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for using the for loop to split the tuple rather than relying on ugly indices :) –  Matthew Trevor May 21 '12 at 7:14

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