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I am trying to execute a std::thread with a member function which returns void(). I can't figure out any syntax where it works - the compiler complains no matter what. What is the correct way to spawn a no-arg member function via std::thread?

#include <thread>
class blub {
  void test() {
  }
public:
  std::thread spawn() {
    return { test };
  }
};
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1  
Do u mean the function returns void, called void or it just doesn't have any parameters. Can u add the code for what you are trying to do? –  Red Serpent May 20 '12 at 13:02
    
Have you tested? (I haven't yet.) Your code seems to rely on the RVO (return-value-optimzation), but I don't think you are supposed to do so. I think using std::move( std::thread(func) ); is better, for std::thread doesn't have a copy-constructor. –  RnMss Oct 10 '13 at 11:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 56 down vote accepted
#include <thread>
#include <iostream>

class bar {
public:
  void foo() {
    std::cout << "hello from member function" << std::endl;
  }
};

int main()
{
  std::thread t(&bar::foo, bar());
  t.join();
}

EDIT: Accounting your edit, you have to do it like this:

  std::thread spawn() {
    return std::thread(&blub::test, this);
  }

UPDATE: I want to explain some more points, some of them have also been discussed in the comments.

The syntax described above is defined in terms of the INVOKE definition (§20.8.2.1):

Define INVOKE (f, t1, t2, ..., tN) as follows:

  • (t1.*f)(t2, ..., tN) when f is a pointer to a member function of a class T and t1 is an object of type T or a reference to an object of type T or a reference to an object of a type derived from T;
  • ((*t1).*f)(t2, ..., tN) when f is a pointer to a member function of a class T and t1 is not one of the types described in the previous item;
  • t1.*f when N == 1 and f is a pointer to member data of a class T and t 1 is an object of type T or a
    reference to an object of type T or a reference to an object of a
    type derived from T;
  • (*t1).*f when N == 1 and f is a pointer to member data of a class T and t 1 is not one of the types described in the previous item;
  • f(t1, t2, ..., tN) in all other cases.

Another general fact which I want to point out is that by default the thread constructor will copy all arguments passed to it. The reason for this is that the arguments may need to outlive the calling thread, copying the arguments guarantees that. Instead, if you want to really pass a reference, you can use a std::reference_wrapper created by std::ref.

std::thread (foo, std::ref(arg1));

By doing this, you are promising that you will take care of guaranteeing that the arguments will still exist when the thread operates on them.


Note that all the things mentioned above can also be applied to std::async and std::bind.

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1  
At least this way it compiles. Though I have no idea why you are passing the instance as the second argument. –  abergmeier May 20 '12 at 13:37
8  
@LCID: The multi-argument version of the std::thread constructor works as if the arguments were passed to std::bind. To call a member function, the first argument to std::bind must be a pointer, reference, or shared pointer to an object of the appropriate type. –  Dave S May 20 '12 at 13:49
    
Where do you take it from that the constructor acts like an implicit bind? I can't find that anywhere. –  Kerrek SB May 20 '12 at 13:58
    
@DaveS this would explain a lot. Though I have the same problem as @Kerrek SB, I cannot find any documentation regarding member functions with std::thread and/or std::bind. –  abergmeier May 20 '12 at 14:14
2  
@KerrekSB, compare [thread.thread.constr]p4 with [func.bind.bind]p3, the semantics are quite similar, defined in terms of the INVOKE pseudocode, which defines how member functions are called –  Jonathan Wakely May 20 '12 at 14:39

use std::bind:

std::thread mythread((std::bind( &myclass::mymemfunction, myclassobjectpointer)))

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13  
std::bind ist not needed here –  bamboon May 20 '12 at 13:05
1  
Why the downvote? of course there is the simpler solution as shown by bamboon, but my solution works aswell, and demonstrates the usage of std::bind to create function objects for member functions, which can be very useful for STL algorithms etc.. Not every part of the standard library supports member functions as nicely as std::thread. –  smerlin May 20 '12 at 18:07
1  
Just to make it clear, I wasn't the one to downvote. –  bamboon May 20 '12 at 18:17
6  
If the question was "What is the correct way to get a callable object from a no-arg member function?" then std::bind would be the right answer, but the question was "What is the correct way to spawn a no-arg member function via std::thread?" and using std::bind is not the correct way. –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 0:23
2  
@Kobor42, look harder before you claim it's not documented: cppreference.com or Concurrency in Action or the same API has been in Boost for years. –  Jonathan Wakely Nov 18 '13 at 12:28

If are using C++11, lambda-expression is a nice&clean solution.

class blub {
    void test() {}
  public:
    std::thread spawn() {
      return std::move(
        std::thread( [this] { this->test(); } )
      );
    }
};

the this-> can be omitted.

std::thread( [this] { test(); } )

or just

std::thread( [=] { test(); } )

I think wrapping the return expr with std::move(...) is better. If your code can compile, it should be RVO (return-value optimization). However I think it shouldn't, for std::thread doesn't have a copy-constructor.

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2  
In general, you shouldn't use std::move when returning a local variable by value. This actually inhibits RVO. If you just return by value (without the move) the compiler may use RVO, and if it doesn't the standard says it has to invoke move semantics. –  zmb Oct 10 '13 at 11:53
    
@zmb, with the exception that you want code to compile on VC10, you have to move if the return type is not CopyConstructable. –  abergmeier Oct 10 '13 at 13:20
    
@zmb This actually inhibits RVO. Yes it does. But that is a hack, and RVO is a hack, too. It was invented for the pre-C++11 days, where people hadn't got a better idea. And then RValue-Ref came to rescue. So, I'd suggest keep using move-constructor and wait for someday that compilers use RVO for move-constructors only, instead of the copy ones. : ) –  RnMss Oct 10 '13 at 18:13

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