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I'm looking for a logical (not additional module) to sort by such format. I have a list of strings which looks like:

asdadasBBBsfasdasdas-0112
asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1210

etc. I cant just sort by the numbers, because, for instance: 812 > 113 (812 = August 2012, 113 = January 2013, so its incorrect)

any good strategy??

thanks,

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A schwartzian transform would be a huge waste here. This similar construct whose name I can never remember would be way better.

my @sorted =
   map substr($_, 4),
    sort
     map substr($_, -2) . substr($_, -4, 2) . $_,
      @unsorted;

Using the match operator instead of substr:

my @sorted =
   map substr($_, 4),
    sort
     map { /(..)(..)\z/s; $2.$1.$_ }
      @unsorted;
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2  
Guttman Rosler Transform –  Greg Bacon May 20 '12 at 19:30
1  
For the benchmarks I ran across array sizes from 10 to 200k, GRT was 2-5x faster than ST or naive implementations. –  Greg Bacon May 20 '12 at 20:56
    
Benchmark performance, code –  Greg Bacon May 21 '12 at 20:11

How about Schwartzian transform:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dump qw(dump);

my @list = (
    'asdadasBBBsfasdasdas-0112',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1210',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1211',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1010',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1011',
);

my @sorted = 
    map  { $_->[0] }
    sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] or $a->[2] <=> $b->[2] }
    map  { /-(\d\d)(\d\d)$/; [$_, $2, $1] } @list;
dump @sorted;

output:

(
  "asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1010",
  "asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1210",
  "asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1011",
  "asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1211",
  "asdadasBBBsfasdasdas-0112",
)
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1  
+1 for the perlish way using a Schwartzian transformation. I myself would have used $_->[2] instead of the splice tho. –  dgw May 20 '12 at 15:37
1  
I always put the string in $_->[0] when I use ST. That way, the top map is always map $_->[0],. In this case, the bottom would would simplify to map [ $_, /(..)(..)\z/s ],. –  ikegami May 21 '12 at 3:32

Use a sorting function that looks at the year first, and then the date:

sub mmyy_sorter {

    my $a_yy = substr($a, -2);
    my $b_yy = substr($b, -2);

    my $a_mm = substr($a, -4, 2);
    my $b_mm = substr($b, -4, 2);

    return ($a_yy cmp $b_yy) || ($a_mm cmp $b_mm);
}

my @sorted = sort mmyy_sorter @myarray;

NB: this is technically not as efficient as it could be as it has to re-calculate the month and year subfields for every comparison, not just once for each item in the array.

It would also be possible to take advantage of Perl's automatic type conversion and use the <=> operator in place of cmp, since all of the values actually represent numbers.

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Computing substrings is cheap. Have you benchmarked versus a full-up Schwartzian Transform? –  Greg Bacon May 20 '12 at 13:29
    
@GregBacon I haven't, but I wouldn't expect any material difference in performance until hitting 1000+ entries. –  Alnitak May 20 '12 at 14:33
    
I have corrected the typo which prevented your sort routine from sorting correctly. –  pilcrow May 21 '12 at 15:57
    
@pilcrow ah, thanks and well spotted! Somehow that didn't show up in my tests. –  Alnitak May 21 '12 at 16:01
    
+1 FWIW, this approach can be 100% faster by dropping the variable assignments and simply (substr(...) cmp substr(...) || .... That's only about 50% as readable, though. :) –  pilcrow May 21 '12 at 16:19

What about remake it to months? For example:

812 = 12 * 12 + 8

113 = 13 * 12 + 1

You can turn years into months and it will be good. For selecting numbers you can use regex.

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Thanks to @M42 for the sample data.

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

my @list = (
    'asdadasBBBsfasdasdas-0112',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1210',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1211',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1010',
    'asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1011',
);

my @sorted = sort {
  my ($aa, $bb) = map { /(..)(..)\z/ and $2.$1 } $a, $b;
  $aa <=> $bb;
} @list;

say for @sorted;

output

asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1010
asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1210
asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1011
asdanfnfnfnfnf222ads-1211
asdadasBBBsfasdasdas-0112
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