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If I have:

class foo implements Cloneable

and then do:

bar = new foo();
bar.clone();

I get a shallow copy without needing to write any bar.clone() code like I normally would need to do when I implement an interface.

My understanding is that an interface's functions must be filled in by the class implementing it, and Object.clone() has no implementation (as per the docs, "The class Object does not itself implement the interface Cloneable")

So where does my shallow clone come from? Where is the code that implements bar.clone() if Object.clone() has no implementation? I'm confused.

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I encourage you to accept an answer or ask for more clarification so that we can get to the right answer :-). –  Tom Dec 29 '10 at 4:13
    
@Tom sure thing :) –  ambertch Jan 3 '11 at 22:51
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3 Answers 3

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Be very careful using clone. In fact, I would avoid it completely. I have never needed it. BUT... that being said, the best discussion of the topic I have ever read is by Joshua Bloch, in Effective Java. Read Item 11: "Override clone judiciously". I was able to find a pdf of the chapter that contains that item here.

PLEASE do yourself a favor and read that item. I actually recommend reading that entire chapter (and the rest of the book). Everything you need to know about clone and why I caution you about it is in there.

Hope this helps.

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+1 for Effective Java. The discussion on cloning is great, as is the entire book. –  Jim Ferrans Jul 1 '09 at 5:57
    
This should almost be the only answer. Given Joshua Bloch's excellent discussion of the design flaws inherent in Cloneable, one could almost say that it's just a design mistake in Java to begin with. You're almost always better off using a copy constructor/static factory. –  Visionary Software Solutions Jun 12 '13 at 20:37
1  
Link is "broken" :( –  Renato Lochetti Oct 29 '13 at 22:33
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Object.clone() has an implementation:

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html#clone()

This link explains the Cloneable interface: http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Cloneable.html

An object must implement the Cloneable interface in order to call the clone() method, otherwise, it throws a CloneNotSupportedException.

By definition, all classes in Java extend the base Object class, and Object class has a default clone() method, even though Object itself does not implement Cloneable. The Object class's clone() method will be called if you do not override it yourself.

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ah i see. I misread the docs - object DOES have code for clone(), it just doesn't implement cloneable So then what is the mechanism for enforcing the cloneable implementation in order to call class.clone()? Is this just something JRE is aware of to deliberately check? –  ambertch Jul 1 '09 at 5:38
    
The quick answer -- nothing. The interface dtermines the behaviour of Object's clone() implementation. If a class is Cloneable, Object.clone() returns a copy, otherwise it throws CloneNotSupportedException. The Cloneable interface essentially modifies the behaviour of its superclass's implementation of clone(). –  Cambium Jul 1 '09 at 5:54
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If I have: "class foo implements cloneable"

and then do: bar = new foo(); bar.clone();

I get a shallow copy without needing to write any bar.clone() code like I normally would need to do when I implement an interface.

That would only work if you are calling it within the class "foo", because the .clone() method inherited from Object is protected.

My understanding is that an interface's functions must be filled in by the class implementing it, and Object.clone() has no implementation (as per the docs, "The class Object does not itself implement the interface Cloneable")

(1) Object.clone() does have an implementation. It makes a shallow copy of the object if the object implements Cloneable. (2) The .clone() method is not part of any interface. (3) Having a .clone() method and implementing the Cloneable interface are completely separate things. You only need to implement the Cloneable interface if you intend to make use of Object's clone method; however, this is the recommended way to write a clone method for your class -- to get its copy from the superclass's clone method, which eventually goes up to Object's clone method.

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Thanks, yes you're write - my bad as I misread the sentence and conflated "implements coneable" with "having an implementation" –  ambertch Jul 2 '09 at 19:04
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