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I'm refactoring some time consuming function so that it can be called from a thread, but I'm having trouble wrapping my head around the issue (not very familiar with thread programming).

At any point, the user can cancel and the function will stop. I do not want to kill the thread as soon as the user cancels since it could cause some data integrity problems. Instead, in several places in the function, I will check if the function has been cancelled and, if so, exit. I will only do that where I know it's safe to exit.

The whole code of the function will be within a mutex. This is the pseudo-code I have in mind:

SomeClass::SomeClass() {
    cancelled_ = false;
}

void SomeClass::cancelBigSearch() {
    cancelled_ = true;
}

void SomeClass::bigSearch() {
    mutex.lock();

    // ...
    // Some code
    // ...

    // Safe to exit at this point
    if (cancelled_) {
        mutex.unlock();
        cancelled_ = false;
        return;
    } 

    // ...
    // Some more code
    // ...

    if (cancelled_) {
        mutex.unlock();
        cancelled_ = false;
        return;
    }   

    // ...
    // Again more code
    // ...

    if (cancelled_) {
        mutex.unlock();
        cancelled_ = false;
        return;
    }   

    mutex.unlock();
}

So when the user starts a search, a new thread calls bigSearch(). If the user cancels, cancelBigSearch() is called and a cancelled_ flag is set. Then, when bigSearch() reaches a point where it's safe to exit, it will exit.

Any idea if this is all thread-safe?

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1  
You should unlock the mutex AFTER changing the cancelled value. While your particular sequence most likely wouldn't cause a problem, you should never change sentinel values outside of the mutex. –  Marc B May 20 '12 at 14:10
    
Thread safety have to be analyzed when there are more than on thread using some resource. Is it so in your situation? If yes, what are that shared resources? –  Ruben May 20 '12 at 14:12
    
Marc B, in such case he will not have possibility to set cancelled flag while bigSearch is working (because mutex is locked). –  Ruben May 20 '12 at 14:14
3  
Side-note: use a lock guard for exception safety with the mutex. In your code, if an exception is thrown the mutex never gets unlocked. Using a lock guard will also unlock the mutex automatically when you return. –  user1203803 May 20 '12 at 14:33
1  
You need to make sure that cancelled_ is marked as volatile. –  Gray May 20 '12 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should lock access to cancelled_ with another mutex, so checking and setting does not happen simultaneously. Other than that, I think your approach is OK

Update: Also, make sure no exceptions can be thrown from SomeClass::bigSearch(), otherwise the mutex might remain in a locked state. To make sure that all return paths unlock the mutex, you might want to surround the processing parts of the code with if (!cancelled_) and return only at the very end of the method (where you have the one unlock() call on the mutex.

Better yet, wrap the mutex in a RAII (acronym for Resource Allocation Is Initialization) object, so no matter how the function ends (exception or otherwise), the mutex is guaranteed to be unlocked.

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2  
or just use those atomic helper stuff in your favorite library. –  J-16 SDiZ May 20 '12 at 14:34
3  
@J Or std::atomic in C++11 –  Alan Stokes May 20 '12 at 14:48

Yes, this is thread safe. But:

  1. Processors can have separate cache and cache it's own copy of cancelled_, typically mutex synchronization functions applies proper cache synchronization.
  2. Compiler generated code, can make invalid assumptions about Your data locality, this can lead to not update in time cancelled_. Some platform specific commands can help here, or you can simply use other mechanisms.

All these lead to a thread that isn't canceled in time as you wish.

Your code usage pattern is simple "signaling". So you need to transfer signal to thread. Signal patterns allows trigger multiple times same trigger (signal), and clear it later.

This can be simulated using:

  • atomic operations
  • mutex protected variables
  • signal synchronization primitives
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It's not thread-safe, because one thread could read cancelled_ at the same time another thread writes to it, which is a data race, which is undefined behaviour.

As others suggested, either use an atomic type for cancelled_ or protect it with another mutex.

You should also use RAII types to lock the mutexes.

e.g.

void SomeClass::cancelBigSearch() {
  std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(cxlMutex_);
  cancelled_ = true;
}

bool SomeClass::cancelled() {
  std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(cxlMutex_);
  if (cancelled_) {
    // reset to false, to avoid caller having to lock mutex again to reset it
    cancelled_ = false;
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

void SomeClass::bigSearch() {
  std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mutex);

  // ...
  // Some code
  // ...

  // Safe to exit at this point
  if (cancelled())
    return;

  // ...
  // Some more code
  // ...

  if (cancelled())
    return;

  // ...
  // Again more code
  // ...

  if (cancelled())
    return;
}
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