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I have some code that I want to execute if an exception happens. But that code can also generate an exception. But I have never seen people do a try/catch inside another try/catch.

Is what I am doing poor practice and maybe there is a better way of doing this:

     Uri uri = Uri.parse("some url");
     Intent intent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW, uri);

     try 
     {
            startActivity(intent);
     } 
     catch (ActivityNotFoundException anfe) 
     {
            // Make some alert to me

            // Now try to redirect them to the web version:
            Uri weburi = Uri.parse("some url");
            try
            {
               Intent webintent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW, weburi);
               startActivity(webintent);
            }
            catch ( Exception e )
            {
                // Make some alert to me                     
            }
     } 

It seems kind of awkward. Is there something that might be wrong with it?

Thanks!

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2  
You might consider put the code in the catch block in its own method. –  Hunter McMillen May 20 '12 at 14:59
    
@HunterMcMillen good point. :) –  GeekedOut May 20 '12 at 15:01
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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

It's fine, although if your exception handling logic is that complex, you might consider breaking it out into its own function.

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It is a bad practice to write code with so many levels of nesting, especially in try-catch - so I would say: avoid. On the other hand throwing an exception from catch block is unforgivable sin, so you should be very careful.

My advice - extract your catch logic into a method (so catch block is simple) and make sure this method will never throw anything:

Uri uri = Uri.parse("some url");
Intent intent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW, uri);

try 
{
    startActivity(intent);
} 
catch (ActivityNotFoundException anfe) 
{
    // Make some alert to me

    // Now try to redirect them to the web version:
    Uri weburi = Uri.parse("some url");
    Intent webintent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW, weburi);
    silentStartActivity(webintent)
} 

//...

private void silentStartActivity(Intent intent) {
    try
    {
       startActivity(webintent);
    }
    catch ( Exception e )
    {
        // Make some alert to me                     
    }
}

Also it seems (I might be wrong) that you are using exceptions to control program flow. Consider standard return value if throwing ActivityNotFoundException is not an exceptional situation but it might happen under normal circumstances.

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thanks...why do you say throwing an exception in a try/catch is a sin? :) –  GeekedOut May 20 '12 at 14:59
1  
"So many levels?" I see a grand total of three. His logic in the catch block is no deeper than an if block in his try block would be. –  T.J. Crowder May 20 '12 at 15:00
    
The problem I saw with breaking it up is that I don't know how to check for the condition of whether the exception will happen or not since I am trying to go to an external url. –  GeekedOut May 20 '12 at 15:00
    
@GeekedOut: It's the handling that you might extract into a function. But see also Tomasz's just-added point about using exceptions to control program flow (an anti-pattern), which is a good point. –  T.J. Crowder May 20 '12 at 15:01
1  
@GeekedOut: because I thought about finally block, not catch block. There is nothing wrong with throwing from catch, throwing from finally is a terrible idea because if finally was called due to an exception, throwing another exception will discard the original one. Sorry, I removed this part. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz May 20 '12 at 15:02
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Answer is No..It is 100% fine.. You might have to use lot of these in JDBC and IO, because they have lot of exceptions to be handled, one inside another...

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