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I just need some confirmation is database designed like this is fine or not. And if not am I doing something wrong here.
I have following tables:

TableA{TableAID,...}
TableB{TableBID,...}
TableC{TableCID,...}
etc.

And I have one table that I use like some kind of 'news feed'. When I add something in any table A,B,C I also add row in this table.

Feed{FeedID, TypeID, ReferenceID,...}

FeedID is PK auto increment
TypeID is number that reference types table and based on this ID I know is row in this table from table A,B,C.
ReferenceId is ID of item in tables A,B,C.
A,B,C tables all have different fields.
Now when I want to get feed data I also need to grab some data from each of this table to use it in application. In my query to get this I use a lot SELECT CASE CLAUSE like:

I first join to all tables in query (A,B,C)

...
CASE Feed.TypeId              
               WHEN 1 THEN tableA.someData
                           WHEN 2 THEN tableB.someData
                           WHEN 3 THEN tableC.someData
          END AS Data,
...

enter image description here

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1:1 exension tables make for fairly involved queries. I prefer a single table. With nullable columns for attributes that are not relevant for each feed type. –  Andomar May 20 '12 at 16:03
1  
Why are A, B and C separate tables? Why not have one table with a type attribute, instead of abstracting that and complicating the model? If you have to write queries that involve additional columns based on the table, those queries could be similarly complex by involving additional columns based on the type. In other words, as @Andomar suggested, all possible columns would be in that other table, and some would be nullable based on type. –  Aaron Bertrand May 20 '12 at 16:27
    
Because they are separate entities A can have 10 columns, B 3 columns, and C 5. –  1110 May 20 '12 at 17:55
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without getting into suitability of this for a specific purpose, your supertype-subtype model is "reversed".

enter image description here

So DDL looks something like

CREATE TABLE Feed ( 
      FeedID               integer  IDENTITY(1,1) not null
    , FeedType             char(1)  not null
  --  Common_Columns_Here
    , Common_Column        varchar(20)
);
ALTER TABLE Feed ADD CONSTRAINT pk_Feed PRIMARY KEY (FeedID) ;


CREATE TABLE Feed_A ( 
      FeedID               integer  not null
  --  A_Specific_Columns_Here
    , A_Specific_Column    varchar(20)
);
ALTER TABLE Feed_A ADD
  CONSTRAINT  pk_Feed_A PRIMARY KEY (FeedID)
, CONSTRAINT fk1_Feed_A FOREIGN KEY (FeedID) REFERENCES Feed(FeedID) ;


CREATE TABLE Feed_B (
      FeedID               integer  not null
  --  B_Specific_Columns_Here
    , B_Specific_Column    varchar(20)
);
ALTER TABLE Feed_B ADD 
  CONSTRAINT  pk_Feed_B PRIMARY KEY (FeedID)
, CONSTRAINT fk1_Feed_B FOREIGN KEY (FeedID) REFERENCES Feed(FeedID) ;


CREATE TABLE Feed_C ( 
      FeedID               integer  not null
  --  C_Specific_Columns_Here
    , C_Specific_Column    varchar(20)
);
ALTER TABLE Feed_C ADD 
  CONSTRAINT  pk_Feed_C PRIMARY KEY (FeedID)
, CONSTRAINT fk1_Feed_C FOREIGN KEY (FeedID) REFERENCES Feed(FeedID) ;

Now, in order to read from this structure, create a view first

create view vFeed as
select
      f.FeedID
    , FeedType
    , Common_Column
    , A_Specific_Column
    , B_Specific_Column
    , C_Specific_Column
from      Feed   as f
left join Feed_A as a on (a.FeedID = f.FeedID and f.FeedType = 'A')
left join Feed_B as b on (b.FeedID = f.FeedID and f.FeedType = 'B')
left join Feed_C as c on (c.FeedID = f.FeedID and f.FeedType = 'C')
;

Look what happens when I want to select data which I know is from feed A. Note that FeedType is not specified in this query, only column name which belongs to Feed_A (and common column).

select
      FeedID
    , Common_Column
    , A_Specific_Column
from vFeed;

enter image description here

Notice that execution plan shows only Feed and Feed_A tables, query optimizer eliminated tables _B and _C; no need to touch those two.

In other words, you can ask for a specific feed data by simply using only specific columns in a query, and let the optimizer sort everything else out -- no need for CASE ... WHEN .. acrobatics from your example.

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Why do you think it's reversed? If I do design like this than when I get all feeds I can't know to which table to join because I don't have ID of item in another table. –  1110 May 20 '12 at 17:53
    
@1110; see the updated answer –  Damir Sudarevic May 20 '12 at 18:12
    
@1100 to load this structure, first insert into Feed table to obtain the FeedID and then insert into one of _A, _B, _C. I would suggest a stored procedure to take care of that. This way -- by having a view to read and sp to load -- you have isolated DB schema (changes) from the application layer. You could also use INSTEAD OF INSERT, UPDATE trigger on the view. –  Damir Sudarevic May 20 '12 at 18:22
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As I suggested in my comment (and along with @Andomar's wisdom), I think something like this would work better:

CREATE TABLE dbo.FeedTypes
(
  FeedTypeID INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,
  SomedataA INT,
  SomedataB VARCHAR(32),
  SomedataC DATETIME
  --, ... other columns
);

CREATE TABLE dbo.Feeds
(
  FeedID INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,
  FeedTypeID INT NOT NULL FOREIGN KEY
    REFERENCES dbo.FeedTypes(FeedTypeID)
  --, ... other columns
);

You could enforce the presence/absence of data in the relevant columns for a given type using complex check constraints or triggers. But you'd have to have pretty complex logic (as you would in your current model) if a feed can change types easily.

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Add all the data you wish to display in the "News Feed" in the Feed table. It is duplicate data, but it will make your life a lot easier in the long run.

It also ensures that your newsfeed stays historically correct. This means that when I update a record in one of the three tables, the "old" feed data stays intact instead of being updated with the new values.

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