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I am having a great deal of difficulty matching strings that contain a '|' (ascii 124) character in c++. In the following code method, each time it runs it always matches to the last if statement:

if (strComp == "D|A" || "D|M" || "A|D" || "M|D") {c = "010101";}

I have tried escaping the '|' symbol with '\|' which did not work. Surprisingly I have found little information on this issue when searched around. Is there just something else wrong with my code that I am overlooking? It is a normal ascii character, part of me thinks that this should be way easier...

string Code::comp(string strComp) {
string a = "0";
string c = "000000";

if (strComp.find('M') != -1) { a = "1"; }

if (strComp == "0") {c = "101010";}
if (strComp == "1") {c = "111111";}
if (strComp == "-1") {c = "111010";}
if (strComp == "D") {c = "001100";}
if (strComp == "A" || "M") {c = "110000";}
if (strComp == "!D") {c = "001101";}
if (strComp == "!A" || "!M") {c = "110001";}
if (strComp == "-D") {c = "001111";}
if (strComp == "-A" || "-M") {c = "110011";}
if (strComp == "D+1" || "1+D") {c = "011111";}
if (strComp == "A+1" || "M+1" || "1+A" || "1+M") {c = "110111";}
if (strComp == "D-1") {c = "001110";}
if (strComp == "A-1" || "M-1") {c = "110010";}
if (strComp == "D+A" || "D+M" || "A+D" || "M+D") {c = "000010";}
if (strComp == "D-A" || "D-M") {c = "010011";}
if (strComp == "A-D" || "M-D") {c = "000111";}
if (strComp == "D&A" || "D&M" || "A&D" || "M&D") {c = "000000";}
if (strComp == "D|A" || "D|M" || "A|D" || "M|D") {c = "010101";} // This matches every time

return a+c;
}

Thank you very much for your help! Justin

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That's not how C works. Check any introductory text book on language basics. –  Kerrek SB May 20 '12 at 16:14
    
It looks to me like your code is trying to evaluate expressions of some kind via brute force – perhaps it makes more sense to try to parse the expressions and evaluate that way instead of via (essentially) a lookup table. –  Ben Alpert May 20 '12 at 16:16
    
NB: A string constant is an expression all on it's own, and it evaluates true in a boolean context. Now take that and look up the order of operation precedence in c. –  dmckee May 20 '12 at 23:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Instead of

strComp == "D|A" || "D|M" 

you need:

strComp == "D|A" || strComp == "D|M"

as the expression strComp == "D|A" is evaluated before the || operator so you get false || "D|M" or true || "D|M" which is not what you want.

share|improve this answer
1  
While your solution fixes the problem, your explanation is wrong. == has higher precedence than ||, so the equality happens first. –  Aaron Dufour May 20 '12 at 16:16
    
Ahh! I should have seen that. Thank you! –  Justin May 20 '12 at 16:17
    
@AaronDufour: D'oh! Fixed. –  Ben Alpert May 20 '12 at 16:19
1  
Also, what the OP thinks is happening is not what IS happening. It's not just matching the last one every time. It's matching each and every one of the if checks that is using the strcmp == "xx" || "yy" structure. It matches the last one last and since they all set c= to something...c is what it was last set to. There's more mistakes here than just one :P –  Crazy Eddie May 20 '12 at 17:04
    
You may want to explain what true || <string> and false || <string> evaluates too. –  Loki Astari May 20 '12 at 18:30

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