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I am preparing myself for an interview and I came across the followign question. I tried but I could not find anything which can create a class containing thread safe collection without "lock". If know any solution then please help.

Create a C# class derived from Object and implements the following methods:

  • AddString – This method should add a given string to an internal collection
  • ToString – Override this method and return a single, comma-delimited string containing all the strings in the internal collection

Requirements:

  • Must be thread-safe
  • Must support multiple concurrent readers
  • Must not use any pre-existing thread-safe collections
  • Bonus: don’t use any type of lock
share|improve this question
4  
For lock-free techniques, take a look at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163715.aspx, especially Technique 3. –  Michael Liu May 20 '12 at 17:12
1  
This question asks for the ability to mimic the functionality of lock, are you sure you will be interviewing for a position where that is required? –  Henk Holterman May 20 '12 at 17:25

6 Answers 6

Here’s a way of achieving lock-free modification of a collection by working on a local copy and then attempting to atomically swap it with the global collection whilst checking for races:

public class NonLockingCollection
{
    private List<string> collection;

    public NonLockingCollection()
    {
        // Initialize global collection through a volatile write.
        Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref collection, new List<string>(), null);
    }

    public void AddString(string s)
    {
        while (true)
        {
            // Volatile read of global collection.
            var original = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref collection, null, null);

            // Add new string to a local copy.
            var copy = original.ToList();
            copy.Add(s);

            // Swap local copy with global collection,
            // unless outraced by another thread.
            var result = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref collection, copy, original);
            if (result == original)
                break;
        }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        // Volatile read of global collection.
        var original = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref collection, null, null);

        // Since content of global collection will never be modified,
        // we may read it directly.
        return string.Join(",", original);
    }
}

Edit: Since using Interlocked.CompareExchange to implicitly perform volatile reads and writes has given rise to some confusion, I’m posting below the equivalent code with Thread.MemoryBarrier calls instead.

public class NonLockingCollection
{
    private List<string> collection;

    public NonLockingCollection()
    {
        // Initialize global collection through a volatile write.
        collection = new List<string>();
        Thread.MemoryBarrier();
    }

    public void AddString(string s)
    {
        while (true)
        {
            // Fresh volatile read of global collection.
            Thread.MemoryBarrier();
            var original = collection;
            Thread.MemoryBarrier();

            // Add new string to a local copy.
            var copy = original.ToList();
            copy.Add(s);

            // Swap local copy with global collection,
            // unless outraced by another thread.
            var result = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref collection, copy, original);
            if (result == original)
                break;
        }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        // Fresh volatile read of global collection.
        Thread.MemoryBarrier();
        var original = collection;
        Thread.MemoryBarrier();

        // Since content of global collection will never be modified,
        // we may read it directly.
        return string.Join(",", original);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite; it’s a commonly-used way of enforcing a volatile read. Similar to an implicit Thread.MemoryBarrier(). –  Douglas May 20 '12 at 17:40
    
Your code seems not very interested in the results of CompareExchange(). It could 'fail' you know. –  Henk Holterman May 20 '12 at 17:42
1  
@HenkHolterman: In case of failure, the reference-equality check result == original would return false, causing the entire loop to be re-attempted. –  Douglas May 20 '12 at 17:43
    
collection may never be null. CompareExchange(ref location1, value, comparand) writes value to location1 if and only if the current value of location1 is equal to comparand. In the CompareExchange(ref collection, null, null) call, the value of collection would never be equal to null, and would thus never be replaced with null. –  Douglas May 20 '12 at 17:59
1  
Yes, I had to read it 2x. This stuff always make my head hurt. I now think it might work, but I wouldn't touch it with a 3m pole. And of course the ToList() will quickly make this far worse than the heaviest Sync object. –  Henk Holterman May 20 '12 at 18:02

You could create a non blocking linked list. For example something like this.

The .net framework provides methods like CompareExchange(Object, Object, Object) that allow you to write safe code without locking the whole list.

share|improve this answer

The easiest solution is having a field of type string[]. Whenever a caller wants to add a string, create a new array with the new item appended and swap it for the old one.

This model does not require synchronization. It does not tolerate concurrent writers but it allows for concurrent reading.

share|improve this answer

Based on the question you should be able to add a concurrent collection inside your object that will handle the thread safety requirements for you. They did not specify what type of internal collection to use.

You should be able to implement one of the collections from the concurrentcollection namespace and achieve this.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.collections.concurrent.aspx

share|improve this answer

My solution. Basically mimic locking using Interlocked.Exchange and an AutoResetEvents. Did some simple tests and it seems working.

    public class SharedStringClass
    {
        private static readonly int TRUE = 1;
        private static readonly int FALSE = 0;

        private static int allowEntry;

        private static AutoResetEvent autoResetEvent;

        private IList<string> internalCollection;

        public SharedStringClass()
        {
            internalCollection = new List<string>();
            autoResetEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            allowEntry = TRUE;
        }

        public void AddString(string strToAdd)
        {
            CheckAllowEntry();

            internalCollection.Add(strToAdd);

            // set allowEntry to TRUE atomically
            Interlocked.Exchange(ref allowEntry, TRUE);
            autoResetEvent.Set();
        }

        public string ToString()
        {
            CheckAllowEntry();

            // access the shared resource
            string result = string.Join(",", internalCollection);

            // set allowEntry to TRUE atomically
            Interlocked.Exchange(ref allowEntry, TRUE);
            autoResetEvent.Set();
            return result;
        }

        private void CheckAllowEntry()
        {
            while (true)
            {
                // compare allowEntry with TRUE, if it is, set it to FALSE (these are done atomically!!)
                if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref allowEntry, FALSE, TRUE) == FALSE)
                {
                    autoResetEvent.WaitOne();
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
public interface IStringCollection
{
    void AddString(string str);
}


public class NoLockThreadSafeStringCollection : IStringCollection
{
    protected List<string> currentStorage;
    protected readonly List<List<string>> storages;

    public NoLockThreadSafeStringCollection()
    {
        currentStorage = new List<string>();
        storages = new List<List<string>>{ currentStorage };
    }

    public void AddString(string str)
    {
        while (true)
        {
            var current = Interlocked.Exchange(ref currentStorage, null);
            if (current == null)
                continue;

            current.Add(str);
            Interlocked.Exchange(ref currentStorage, current);
            break;
        }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        while(true)
        {
            var current = Interlocked.Exchange(ref currentStorage, null);
            if (current == null)
                continue;            

            var nextStorage = new List<string>();
            var holdStorageCount = storages.Count;
            storages.Add(nextStorage);

            Interlocked.Exchange(ref currentStorage, nextStorage);

            // next operations is unambiguously thread safe, because new strings will be added to storages item with greater index
            var sb = new StringBuilder();
            for (var i = 0; i < holdStorageCount; i++)
            {
                sb.Append(String.Join(";", storages[i]));
            }
            sb.Remove(sb.Length - 1, 1);

            return sb.ToString();
        }
    }
}

Comments: this collection is better than @Douglas implementation

It don’t use list clone (terrible solution, especially in loop in frequent AddString() method) and use multiple lists instead of single list. It is good storage solution, because when list grows - reallock occurs only for part of data.

If to focus on memory usage for test (1000 add, 1 toString) x 1000 – process with single thread use less memory then thread unsafe implementation (with 1 storage list, simple add and toString through stringBuilder).

Maybe good solution would be to force from time to time new storage using to. Maybe usage of queue or linked list is better than array based list (no reallocs, but dereference required). But all these improvement decisions could be made only after fundamental testing with different collection usage ways.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not thread-safe. First, there is nothing preventing multiple threads from calling currentStorage.Add inside AddString at the same time. Second, there is nothing preventing multiple threads from calling storages.Add inside ToString at the same time. Those are only the obvious things I saw. –  Brian Gideon Oct 24 '13 at 16:45
1  
-1: This is essentially a memory leak; you're allocating (and indefinitely retaining) a new List<string> instance each time you call ToString (a method which, per MSDN, “should have no observable side effects”). –  Douglas Oct 25 '13 at 0:04

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