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I'm developing a graphics-intensive application for Android 2.2 and above.

I know that starting with Honeycomb, bitmaps are stored on VM_HEAP instead of their native bitmap heap.

Does this influence the effective memory usage of my application? I mean, e.g., if my app for pre-Honeycomb devices uses X MB of the VM heap, and has Y MB bitmaps (stored on native heap), then I hope it won't start using X+Y MB from the VM heap if it's installed on a Honeycomb or newer device.

This does not sound logical. Instead, I guess that bitmap size is counted against the VM limits even prior to Honeycomb, otherwise why would "bitmap size exceeds VM budget" errors appear? So they're stored on their native heap but still counted against VM_HEAP size maximum).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I was also worried, but I got an answer from Google in the meantime, which confirmed my following assumption:

"This does not sound logical. Instead, I guess that bitmap size is counted against the VM limits even prior to Honeycomb, otherwise why would "bitmap size exceeds VM budget" errors appear? So they're stored on their native heap but still counted against VM_HEAP size maximum)."

Answer from Romain Guy (Android Framework engineer):

"That's correct. Your app will use the same amount of memory pre and post Honeycomb. "

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AFAIK It was changed in honeycomb . Bitmaps are now stored in your dalvik heap(VM_HEAP) and not native heap as in previous versions. (Maybe because they didn't want to depend to SKia GC any more)

One now needs to take care of managing bitmaps more seriously as bitmaps working well on 2.2 could give an OOM exception in 3.0 as the same image is taking more pixels on a tablet (may not apply to 4.0, not sure).

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I thought that would be endanger backward compatibility in a certain respect (i.e. something which was adjusted to a 2.2 device would suddenly start having OOM problems on a newer device). Therefore, I asked the question and I got an answer from the Android team (see my other post), it seems my original assumption was right. –  Thomas Calc May 22 '12 at 8:24
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You are correct. Same thing was said by Dianne hackborn "It was changed, but not in a way that would cause more OOM errors" . But consider an image which is the background image of app in a tablet, then it may take more memory as it stretches to fill the whole tablet(assumption on my part). I should have elaborated the ans with both the fact and my assumptions :) –  Akhil May 22 '12 at 15:57
    
Good point with the stretching. (Since, strictly speaking, it isn't directly related with the changes regarding the bitmap storage model, I've set my post as Answer, and added +1 to your above comment.) –  Thomas Calc May 22 '12 at 19:01
    
(In other words, the concrete implementation of your software can control -- e.g. turn off -- the auto-scaling i.e. stretching, so it isn't an unavoidable consequence of a low-level system mechanism; e.g. if you don't want scaling, you can create tablet-specific and mobile phone-specific versions of your application. Obviously, an image with more pixels uses more memory than an image with less pixels, assuming they are of the same type.) –  Thomas Calc May 22 '12 at 19:06

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