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I know that I should use the access methods. I see in the datetime module that the class datetime inherits from date.

class datetime(date):
    <some other code here....>
    self = date.__new__(cls, year, month, day)
    self._hour = hour
    self._minute = minute
    self._second = second
    self._microsecond = microsecond
    self._tzinfo = tzinfo
    return self

I also see that datetime is able to access the members of date, as in __repr__:

def __repr__(self):
    """Convert to formal string, for repr()."""
    L = [self._year, self._month, self._day, # These are never zero
         self._hour, self._minute, self._second, self._microsecond]

I tried to subclass datetime to add some information to it and then write a similar __repr__ function:

def __repr__(self):
    """Convert to formal string, for repr()."""
    L = [self._year, self._month, self._day, # These are never zero
         self._hour, self._minute, self._second, self._microsecond,
         self._latitude, self._longitude]

The debugger complained that self._year didn't exist. (self.year works, however.)

I know that I should be using the access function. I just want to understand why datetime is able to access the private variables of date but my subclass isn't able.

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1  
Where did you see that Python code? In my Python distro (2.7.3), the datetime module is written in C and not in Python. –  NPE May 20 '12 at 18:08
    
class datetime(date): <some other code here....> self = date.__new__(cls, year, month, day) o_O –  BasicWolf May 20 '12 at 18:13
    
I see the code in C:\Python32\Lib\datetime.py . _year is in there as a member of date. (I know that they are only private variables by convention.) –  Eyal May 20 '12 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

if you look at the end of datetime.py, you'll see this:

try:
    from _datetime import *
except ImportError:
    pass

this imports among other things the C-version of the previously defined python classes, which will therefore be used, and those don't have the members you're trying to access.

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2  
Indeed. You can't not access them because they are private, rather that they don't exist in the implementation he is using. This is why they are indicated as private - they are implementation details and not guaranteed to be there. –  Lattyware May 20 '12 at 18:20
    
This also means that the OP can copy the Python classes and use them instead. And there might be a way to make that import fail (setting _datetime to None in sys.modules?) so that importing datetime gets you the Python version. –  TryPyPy May 20 '12 at 18:33
    
That also explains why my breakpoints in datetime.py aren't catching. datetime.py isn't really being used, for reasons of efficiency. –  Eyal May 20 '12 at 18:38
2  
@TryPyPy - Yes, sure that would be possible (tough a bit hacky), and as I understood it it's not a problem using the accessors as it's only about the representation - and understanding why the classes are different as expected. –  mata May 20 '12 at 18:43

I tried to subclass datetime to add some information to it

Don't do that. The combination of a datetime and latitude/longitude information is not logically a sub-type of datetime. It's a combination of two bits of data.

So create a class that has an attribute to store a datetime and an attribute to store latitude/longitude information (you might consider using a tuple of 2 numbers instead of having two separate values).

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