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I have a question which might be more general, but I came across it during android dev:

How can I best share own common used methods? Eg retrieving a shared preference by key is always the same code. But if I have to use it in different Fragments or Activities, I always have to copy the same code:

private void setSharedPrefs(String key, String value) {
    SharedPreferences settings = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(context);
    SharedPreferences.Editor editor = settings.edit();
    editor.putString(key, value).commit();
}

It it a good habit to make this a public static in a GlobalUtils class or so? How would you handle these kind of functions?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes you could make it public static:

public static void setSharedPrefs(Context context, String key, String value) {
    SharedPreferences settings = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(context);
    SharedPreferences.Editor editor = settings.edit();
    editor.putString(key, value).commit();
}

Be careful in some situations where you may hold onto the context after an activity has died, that is bad.

A more likely scenario your describing could be to create a class like this:

public class MyPrefs {

     SharedPreferences settings;
     SharedPreferences.Editor editor;


     public MyPrefs(Context context){
        settings = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(context);
        editor = settings.edit();
     }

     public void saveName(String name){
          editor.putString("name", name).commit();
     } 

}

You would lazy init this class in your class that extends Application and have a getter in there to retrieve it, with something like:

 MyPrefs prefs = ((MyAppication) getContext().getApplicationContext()).getMyPrefs();

and use it like so:

 prefs.saveName("blundell");

EDIT

Example of Lazy initialisation:

private MyPrefs prefs;

public MyPrefs getMyPrefs(){
     if(prefs == null){
          prefs = new MyPrefs(this);
     }
     return prefs;
}

N.B This is lazy initialization within a class that extends Application therefore this refers to your application context and will live for the duration of your Application. If you where using an Activity context you would not want to use lazy initialisation. (So use the application context!)

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This seems very suitable. But what do you mean with lazy init? I think I have to init by: MyPrefs prefs = new MyPrefs(context); ... prefs.saveName(..); –  membersound May 20 '12 at 21:03
1  
Lazy init means you don't initialize an instance of this until you actually need it. –  QuantumMechanic May 21 '12 at 1:16
    
@membersound updated to show you lazy initialization –  Blundell May 21 '12 at 17:50

You could definitely make a static class such as GlobalUtils or even a dedicated class for SharedPreferences. You just have to pass in a Context to the method so that you could get the SharedPreferences object. You can take this as far as you need it to go; I've made these classes countless times. I even have a thread-safe SharedPreferences wrapper :-)

EDIT: Just looked at my code again and half of my SharedPreference wrappers are static and the rest are lazily instantiated. That being said I think you should do whichever you feel comfortable with as long as the rest of your code doesn't necessitate it going one way or the other.

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1  
Warning: this can be a code smell if abused. Try keeping this stuff organized as much as possible, rather than dumping everything and the kitchen sink into a "utils" class. –  Louis Wasserman May 20 '12 at 21:20
    
I like to keep my utils classes separate even if there's only a few of them and they're very small but some people like to have a "GlobalUtils" class if it's small enough –  Eliezer May 20 '12 at 21:22

I usually write common code inside a static method in a different class. So that i can call the static method anywhere in the project without every time creating new class objects.

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