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It has always bothered me that the only way to copy a file in Java involves opening streams, declaring a buffer, reading in one file, looping through it, and writing it out to the other steam. The web is littered with similar, yet still slightly different implementations of this type of solution.

Is there a better way that stays within the bounds of the Java language (meaning does not involve exec-ing OS specific commands)? Perhaps in some reliable open source utility package, that would at least obscure this underlying implementation and provide a one line solution?

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3  
There could be something in Apache Commons FileUtils, Specifically, the copyFile methods. –  toolkit Sep 20 '08 at 2:04
13  
If using Java 7, use Files.copy instead, as recommended by @GlenBest: stackoverflow.com/a/16600787/44737 –  rob Jun 17 '13 at 21:54

13 Answers 13

up vote 200 down vote accepted

As toolkit mentions above, Apache Commons IO is the way to go, specifically FileUtils.copyFile(); it handles all the heavy lifting for you.

And as a postscript, note that recent versions of FileUtils (such as the 2.0.1 release) have added the use of NIO for copying files; NIO can significantly increase file-copying performance, in a large part because the NIO routines defer copying directly to the OS/filesystem rather than handle it by reading and writing bytes through the Java layer. So if you're looking for performance, it might be worth checking that you are using a recent version of FileUtils.

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1  
Very helpful - do you have any insight as to when an official release will incorporate these nio changes? –  Pete Sep 20 '08 at 3:01
2  
Public release of Apache Commons IO still at 1.4, grrrrrrr –  Pete Sep 2 '09 at 23:05
12  
As of Dec 2010, Apache Commons IO is at 2.0.1, which has the NIO functionality. Answer updated. –  Simon Nickerson Apr 8 '11 at 10:08
2  
A warning to Android people: this is NOT included in the standard Android APIs –  IlDan Feb 6 '12 at 10:46
6  
If using Java 7 or newer, you can use Files.copy as suggested by @GlenBest: stackoverflow.com/a/16600787/44737 –  rob Jun 17 '13 at 21:57

In Java 7 it is easy...

File src = new File("original.txt");
File target = new File("copy.txt");

Files.copy(src.toPath(), target.toPath(), StandardCopyOption.REPLACE_EXISTING);
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1  
What does your answer add to Scott's or Glen's? –  Uri Agassi Jun 20 at 19:59
3  
It's concise, less is more. Their answers are good and detailed, but I missed them when looking through. Unfortunately there are a lot of answers to this and a lot of them are long, obsolete and complicated and Scott and Glen's good answers got lost in that (I will give upvotes to help with that). I wonder if my answer might be improved by reducing it to three lines by knocking out the exists() and error message. –  Kevin Sadler Jun 21 at 8:18
public static void copyFile(File src, File dst) throws IOException
{
    long p = 0, dp, size;
    FileChannel in = null, out = null;

    try
    {
        if (!dst.exists()) dst.createNewFile();

        in = new FileInputStream(src).getChannel();
        out = new FileOutputStream(dst).getChannel();
        size = in.size();

        while ((dp = out.transferFrom(in, p, size)) > 0)
        {
            p += dp;
        }
    }
    finally {
        try
        {
            if (out != null) out.close();
        }
        finally {
            if (in != null) in.close();
        }
    }
}
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So the difference from the top accepted answer is that you've got the transferFrom in a while loop? –  Rup Jan 16 at 11:41
    
Doesn't even compile, and the createNewFile() call is redundant and wasteful. –  EJP Jul 19 at 9:43

Fast and work with all the versions of Java also Android:

private void copy(final File f1, final File f2) throws IOException {
    f2.createNewFile();

    final RandomAccessFile file1 = new RandomAccessFile(f1, "r");
    final RandomAccessFile file2 = new RandomAccessFile(f2, "rw");

    file2.getChannel().write(file1.getChannel().map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, f1.length()));

    file1.close();
    file2.close();
}
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1  
Not all filesystems support memory mapped files though, and I think it's relatively expensive for small files. –  Rup Nov 14 '13 at 10:48
    
Doesn't work with any version of Java prior to 1.4, and there is nothing that guarantees a single write is sufficient. –  EJP Jul 19 at 9:44

To copy a file and save it to your destination path you can use the method below.

public void copy(File src, File dst) throws IOException {
    InputStream in = new FileInputStream(src);
    OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(dst);

    // Transfer bytes from in to out
    byte[] buf = new byte[1024];
    int len;
    while ((len = in.read(buf)) > 0) {
        out.write(buf, 0, len);
    }
    in.close();
    out.close();
}
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1  
This will work, but I don't think it's better than the other answers here? –  Rup Oct 23 '13 at 14:18
7  
It works with Java 6, without extra jars. –  John Henckel Oct 29 '13 at 20:52
1  
@Rup It is considerably better than the other answers here, (a) because it works, and (b) because it doesn't rely on third party software. –  EJP Jul 19 at 9:41
    
@EJP OK, but it's not very smart. File copying should be an OS or filesystem operation, not an application operation: Java hopefully can spot a copy and turn it into an OS operation except by explicitly reading the file in you're stopping it doing that. If you don't think Java can do that, would you trust it to optimise 1K reads and writes into larger blocks? And if source and destination were on a remote share over a slow network then this is clearly doing unneccesary work. Yes some third party JARs are stupidly large (Guava!) but they do add lots of stuff like this done properly. –  Rup Jul 19 at 10:02

Java 7:

      long bytes = java.nio.Files.copy( 
                       new java.io.File("<filepath1>").toPath(), 
                       new java.io.File("<filepath2>").toPath(),
                       java.nio.file.StandardCopyOption.REPLACE_EXISTING,
                       java.nio.file.StandardCopyOption.COPY_ATTRIBUTES
                       java.nio.file.LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS );
  • performance-engineered (integrates with operating system native I/O)

  • works with files, directories and links

  • each of the options is... err, optional :)

  • to move a file/dir (options again optional):

      long bytes = java.nio.Files.move( 
                       new java.io.File("<filepath1>").toPath(), 
                       new java.io.File("<filepath2>").toPath(),
                       java.nio.file.StandardCopyOption.ATOMIC_MOVE,
                       java.nio.file.StandardCopyOption.REPLACE_EXISTING );
    
  • for recursive directory copy:

      long bytes = com.yourcompany.nio.Files.copyRecursive( 
                       new java.io.File("<filepath1>").toPath(), 
                       new java.io.File("<filepath2>").toPath(),
                       java.nio.file.StandardCopyOption.REPLACE_EXISTING,
                       java.nio.file.StandardCopyOption.COPY_ATTRIBUTES
                       java.nio.file.LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS );
    

    where you have the utility class:

    package com.yourcompany.nio;
    
    class Files {
    
        static int copyRecursive(Path source, Path target, boolean prompt, CopyOptions options...) {
            CopyVisitor copyVisitor = new CopyVisitor(source, target, options).copy();
            EnumSet<FileVisitOption> fileVisitOpts;
            if (Arrays.toList(options).contains(java.nio.file.LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS) {
                fileVisitOpts = EnumSet.noneOf(FileVisitOption.class) 
            } else {
                fileVisitOpts = EnumSet.of(FileVisitOption.FOLLOW_LINKS);
            }
            Files.walkFileTree(source[i], fileVisitOpts, Integer.MAX_VALUE, copyVisitor);
        }
    
        private class CopyVisitor implements FileVisitor<Path>  {
            final Path source;
            final Path target;
            final CopyOptions[] options;
    
            CopyVisitor(Path source, Path target, CopyOptions options...) {
                 this.source = source;  this.target = target;  this.options = options;
            };
    
            @Override
            FileVisitResult preVisitDirectory(Path dir, BasicFileAttributes attrs) {
            // before visiting entries in a directory we copy the directory
            // (okay if directory already exists).
            Path newdir = target.resolve(source.relativize(dir));
            try {
                Files.copy(dir, newdir, options);
            } catch (FileAlreadyExistsException x) {
                // ignore
            } catch (IOException x) {
                System.err.format("Unable to create: %s: %s%n", newdir, x);
                return SKIP_SUBTREE;
            }
            return CONTINUE;
        }
    
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file, BasicFileAttributes attrs) {
            Path newfile= target.resolve(source.relativize(file));
            try {
                Files.copy(file, newfile, options);
            } catch (IOException x) {
                System.err.format("Unable to copy: %s: %s%n", source, x);
            }
            return CONTINUE;
        }
    
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult postVisitDirectory(Path dir, IOException exc) {
            // fix up modification time of directory when done
            if (exc == null && Arrays.toList(options).contains(COPY_ATTRIBUTES)) {
                Path newdir = target.resolve(source.relativize(dir));
                try {
                    FileTime time = Files.getLastModifiedTime(dir);
                    Files.setLastModifiedTime(newdir, time);
                } catch (IOException x) {
                    System.err.format("Unable to copy all attributes to: %s: %s%n", newdir, x);
                }
            }
            return CONTINUE;
        }
    
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFileFailed(Path file, IOException exc) {
            if (exc instanceof FileSystemLoopException) {
                System.err.println("cycle detected: " + file);
            } else {
                System.err.format("Unable to copy: %s: %s%n", file, exc);
            }
            return CONTINUE;
        }
    }
    
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If you are in a web application which already uses Spring and if you do not want to include Apache Commons IO for simple file copying, you can use FileCopyUtils of the Spring framework.

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Google's Guava library also has a copy method:

public static void copy(File from,
                        File to)
                 throws IOException
Copies all the bytes from one file to another.

Warning: If to represents an existing file, that file will be overwritten with the contents of from. If to and from refer to the same file, the contents of that file will be deleted.

Parameters:from - the source fileto - the destination file

Throws: IOException - if an I/O error occurs IllegalArgumentException - if from.equals(to)

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Three possible problems with the above code:

  1. If getChannel throws an exception, you might leak an open stream.
  2. For large files, you might be trying to transfer more at once than the OS can handle.
  3. You are ignoring the return value of transferFrom, so it might be copying just part of the file.

This is why org.apache.tools.ant.util.ResourceUtils.copyResource is so complicated. Also note that while transferFrom is OK, transferTo breaks on JDK 1.4 on Linux (see Bug ID:5056395) – Jesse Glick Jan

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  nbrooks Aug 4 at 13:28

I would avoid the use of a mega api like apache commons. This is a simplistic operation and its built into the JDK in the new NIO package. It was kind of already linked to in a previous answer, but the key method in the NIO api are the new functions "transferTo" and "transferFrom".

http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/nio/channels/FileChannel.html#transferTo(long,%20long,%20java.nio.channels.WritableByteChannel)

One of the linked articles shows a great way on how to integrate this function into your code, using the transferFrom:

public static void copyFile(File sourceFile, File destFile) throws IOException {
    if(!destFile.exists()) {
        destFile.createNewFile();
    }

    FileChannel source = null;
    FileChannel destination = null;

    try {
        source = new FileInputStream(sourceFile).getChannel();
        destination = new FileOutputStream(destFile).getChannel();
        destination.transferFrom(source, 0, source.size());
    }
    finally {
        if(source != null) {
            source.close();
        }
        if(destination != null) {
            destination.close();
        }
    }
}

Learning NIO can be a little tricky, so you might want to just trust in this mechanic before going off and trying to learn NIO overnight. From personal experience it can be a very hard thing to learn if you don't have the experience and were introduced to IO via the java.io streams.

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2  
Thanks, useful info. I would still argue for something like Apache Commons, especially if it uses nio (properly) underneath; but I agree it is important to understand the underlying fundamentals. –  Pete Sep 22 '08 at 17:19
1  
Unfortunately, there are caveats. When I copied 1.5 Gb file on Windows 7, 32 bit, it failed to map the file. I had to look for another solution. –  Crash Jan 12 '11 at 8:48
8  
Three possible problems with the above code: (a) if getChannel throws an exception, you might leak an open stream; (b) for large files, you might be trying to transfer more at once than the OS can handle; (c) you are ignoring the return value of transferFrom, so it might be copying just part of the file. This is why org.apache.tools.ant.util.ResourceUtils.copyResource is so complicated. Also note that while transferFrom is OK, transferTo breaks on JDK 1.4 on Linux: bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=5056395 –  Jesse Glick Jan 28 '11 at 0:41
6  
I believe this updated version addresses those concerns: gist.github.com/889747 –  Mark Renouf Mar 27 '11 at 23:15
5  
This code has a major problem. transferTo() must be called in a loop. It doesn't guarantee to transfer the entire amount requested. –  EJP Jun 1 '13 at 1:30

Now with Java 7, you can use the following try-with-resource syntax:

public static void copyFile( File from, File to ) throws IOException {

    if ( !to.exists() ) { to.createNewFile(); }

    try (
        FileChannel in = new FileInputStream( from ).getChannel();
        FileChannel out = new FileOutputStream( to ).getChannel() ) {

        out.transferFrom( in, 0, in.size() );
    }
}

Or, better yet, this can also be accomplished using the new Files class introduced in Java 7:

public static void copyFile( File from, File to ) throws IOException {
    Files.copy( from.toPath(), to.toPath() );
}

Pretty snazzy, eh?

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9  
It's amazing Java hasn't added things like this before today. Certain operations are just the absolute essentials of writing computer software. The Oracle developers of Java could learn a thing or two from operating systems, looking at what services they provide, to make it EASIER for newbies to migrate over. –  Rick Hodgin Oct 18 '11 at 22:30
2  
Ah thanks! I was not aware of the new "Files" class with all of its helper functions. It has exactly what I need. Thanks for the example. –  ChrisCantrell Nov 27 '12 at 0:26
1  
performance wise, java NIO FileChannel is better, read this article journaldev.com/861/4-ways-to-copy-file-in-java –  Pankaj Dec 4 '12 at 0:36
1  
This code has a major problem. transferTo() must be called in a loop. It doesn't guarantee to transfer the entire amount requested. –  EJP Jun 1 '13 at 1:30
    
@Scott: Pete asked for a one-line solution and you're so close...it's unnecessary to wrap Files.copy in a copyFile method. I'd just put the Files.copy(Path from, Path to) at the beginning of your answer and mention that you can use File.toPath() if you have existing File objects: Files.copy(fromFile.toPath(), toFile.toPath()) –  rob Jun 18 '13 at 17:13

Available as standard in Java 7, path.copyTo: http://openjdk.java.net/projects/nio/javadoc/java/nio/file/Path.html http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/essential/io/copy.html

I can't believe it took them so long to standardise something so common and simple as file copying :(

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7  
There is no Path.copyTo; it is Files.copy. –  Jesse Glick Mar 3 '12 at 0:59

Note that all of these mechanisms only copy the contents of the file, not the metadata such as permissions. So if you were to copy or move an executable .sh file on linux the new file would not be executable.

In order to truly a copy or move a file, ie to get the same result as copying from a command line, you actually need to use a native tool. Either a shell script or JNI.

Apparently, this might be fixed in java 7 - http://today.java.net/pub/a/today/2008/07/03/jsr-203-new-file-apis.html. Fingers crossed!

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