Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on an a scavenger hunt app and I'd just like to know if I'm modelling it correctly. There is a list of hunts that users can go on. These hunts are templates that can be customized (e.g. adding/removing certain tasks).

When a user chooses to go on a hunt, I'm calling that a "trip." I've read the Rails Guide on associates and I believe that I should set up the trip model as a join table between users and hunts. Here's what I'm thinking.

    class Users 
      has_many :trips
      has_many :hunts, :through => :trips

    class Hunts
      has_one :trip
      has_many :users, :through => : trips

    class Trip
      belongs_to :users
      belongs_to :hunts

And then the migration where I setup the Trip table would look like this.

    def change
      trip_name
      user_id
      hunt_id
    end

I have two questions.

  1. Does this look right?
  2. Is there a smarter (or more elegant) way to do this?

Update: Here's what I ended up doing.

    class Users 
      has_many :trips
      has_many :hunts, :through => trips

    class Hunts
      has_one :trip
      has_many :users, :through => trips

    class Trip
      belongs_to :hunts
      belongs_to :users

and then

    def change
      create_table :trips do |t|
        t.string :trip_name
        t.references :user
        t.references :hunt
      end
      add_index :trips, :hunt_id
      add_index :trips, :user_id
      add_index :trips, [:hunt_id, :user_id], :unique => true
    end
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I see a few small problems:

  1. Models are idiomatically singular: change Users and Hunts unless you have an unusual situation.
  2. A Hunt probably has_many :trips, right?
  3. Your migration is suspiciously sparse. The change method would usually look something like this:

.

def change
  create_table :trips do |t|
    t.string :trip_name
    t.references :user
    t.references :hunt
  end
end

Structurally, what you have makes sense to me.

Aside: I’ve organised adventures sometimes referred to scavenger hunts, I’m glad I’m not the only programmer doing such things!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. I have a questions. (1) why use t.references :user instead of something like t.integer :user_id? Is it a stylistic choice? Or is there something more to it? Also, should I add indices to the trips table for user and trip? –  Ben Downey May 20 '12 at 21:41
1  
t.references :user is equivalent to t.integer :user_id, but it’s more expressive: it makes it explicit that it’s describing an inter-table relationship. Also possible is t.references :user, polymorphic: true. Indexing your tables is good for performance, so there’s little reason not to, but it seems unlikely to me that it would be necessary. –  Buck Doyle May 20 '12 at 21:45
    
Gotcha. References looks interesting. I'll totally use it. –  Ben Downey May 20 '12 at 21:55
    
I dig your site. Thanks for sending the link. Fave line so far: "Is knowing about the impending doom and subsequent death of everyone on Earth getting you down?" Laughed out loud when I read that. –  Ben Downey May 20 '12 at 22:11

you are making the association complicated. since Hunts : Trip = 1 : 1, you don't need both of them associated with Users, e.g.

class Users 
  has_many :hunts
  has_many :trips, :through => hunts

class Hunts
  has_one :trip
  has_many :users

class Trip
  belongs_to :hunt  # belongs to singular word. :)

and then, create a table "users_hunts", which looks like:

# users_hunts table, has 3 columns:
id
user_id
hunt_id 

and trips table looks like:

# trip table , has 1 extra column: 
id 
hunt_id
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. I'm not sure if I can take this approach though, since there isn't a 1:1 correspondence between Hunts and Trips. One hunt could have many Trip. Each hunt is basically just a template. –  Ben Downey May 20 '12 at 21:57

I would go with

class Users 
  has_many :trips
  has_many :hunts, :through => trips

class Hunts
  has_one :trip
  has_many :users, :through => trips

class Trip
  belongs_to :hunts
  belongs_to :users

Even if you don't need the relationship both ways yet, it's easier to understand (imho) and it's set up for the future, allowing users to have many hunts and hunts to have many users which seems eminently feasible.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. Good point! –  Ben Downey May 20 '12 at 22:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.