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What's the easiest way to auto crop the white border out of an image in java? Thanks in advance...

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2  
"What's the easiest way to.." Asking random strangers on the internet to do it for you? What have you tried? –  Andrew Thompson May 20 '12 at 23:29
1  
Try this stackoverflow.com/questions/273530/… –  ptay89 May 20 '12 at 23:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want the white parts to be invisible, best way is to use image filters and make white pixels transparent, it is discussed here by @PhiLho with some good samples, if you want to resize your image so it's borders won't have white colors, you can do it with four simple loops, this little method that I've write for you does the trick, note that it just crop upper part of image, you can write the rest,

    private Image getCroppedImage(String address) throws IOException{
    BufferedImage source = ImageIO.read(new File(address)) ;

    boolean flag = false ;
    int upperBorder = -1 ; 
    do{
        upperBorder ++ ;
        for (int c1 =0 ; c1 < source.getWidth() ; c1++){
            if(source.getRGB(c1, upperBorder) != Color.white.getRGB() ){
                flag = true;
                break ;
            }
        }

        if (upperBorder >= source.getHeight())
            flag = true ;
    }while(!flag) ;

    BufferedImage destination = new BufferedImage(source.getWidth(), source.getHeight() - upperBorder, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB) ;
    destination.getGraphics().drawImage(source, 0, upperBorder*-1, null) ;

    return destination ;
}
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Here's a way to crop all 4 sides, using the color from the very top-left pixel as the baseline, and allow for a tolerance of color variation so that noise in the image won't make the crop useless

public BufferedImage getCroppedImage(BufferedImage source, double tolerance) {
   // Get our top-left pixel color as our "baseline" for cropping
   int baseColor = source.getRGB(0, 0);

   int width = source.getWidth();
   int height = source.getHeight();

   int topY = Integer.MAX_VALUE, topX = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
   int bottomY = -1, bottomX = -1;
   for(int y=0; y<height; y++) {
      for(int x=0; x<width; x++) {
         if (colorWithinTolerance(baseColor, source.getRGB(x, y), tolerance)) {
            if (x < topX) topX = x;
            if (y < topY) topY = y;
            if (x > bottomX) bottomX = x;
            if (y > bottomY) bottomY = y;
         }
      }
   }

   BufferedImage destination = new BufferedImage( (bottomX-topX+1), 
                 (bottomY-topY+1), BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB);

   destination.getGraphics().drawImage(source, 0, 0, 
               destination.getWidth(), destination.getHeight(), 
               topX, topY, bottomX, bottomY, null);

   return destination;
}

private boolean colorWithinTolerance(int a, int b, double tolerance) {
    int aAlpha  = (int)((a & 0xFF000000) >>> 24);   // Alpha level
    int aRed    = (int)((a & 0x00FF0000) >>> 16);   // Red level
    int aGreen  = (int)((a & 0x0000FF00) >>> 8);    // Green level
    int aBlue   = (int)(a & 0x000000FF);            // Blue level

    int bAlpha  = (int)((b & 0xFF000000) >>> 24);   // Alpha level
    int bRed    = (int)((b & 0x00FF0000) >>> 16);   // Red level
    int bGreen  = (int)((b & 0x0000FF00) >>> 8);    // Green level
    int bBlue   = (int)(b & 0x000000FF);            // Blue level

    double distance = Math.sqrt((aAlpha-bAlpha)*(aAlpha-bAlpha) +
                                (aRed-bRed)*(aRed-bRed) +
                                (aGreen-bGreen)*(aGreen-bGreen) +
                                (aBlue-bBlue)*(aBlue-bBlue));

    // 510.0 is the maximum distance between two colors 
    // (0,0,0,0 -> 255,255,255,255)
    double percentAway = distance / 510.0d;     

    return (percentAway > tolerance);
}
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Perfect! Thanks very much! –  mbelow Mar 26 '13 at 10:01
    
what is this tolerence means? –  Nishad Nichoos Sep 17 '13 at 11:52
    
The tolerance allows for images without a perfectly solid background color to still be cropped. For example, if you scan a drawing from a sheet of paper, the paper won't show up as an exact white, but rather will consist of a range of colors close to white. If you tried to crop just by matching one specific color of white, little (if anything) would be cropped. By allowing for some variation in the color of the background being cropped, it can remove all the unnecessary surrounding background and leave you with just the drawing. –  Todd Sep 17 '13 at 15:54

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