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I have made a list that uses a list of dates as an index, like so:

>>> import datedlist
>>> import datetime
>>> dates = [datetime.date(2012,1,x) for x in range(2,6)]
>>> values = range(4,8)
>>> dates
[datetime.date(2012, 1, 2), datetime.date(2012, 1, 3), datetime.date(2012, 1, 4), datetime.date(2012, 1, 5)]
>>> dl = datedlist.DatedList(values, dates)
>>> dl
[4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> dl[datetime.date(2012,1,3)]
5

So far all is well, but I also want to be able to use slicing (not extended slicing), like so (the following does not work - it is the result I want):

>>> datedlist[datetime.date(2012,1,3):datetime.date(2012,1,4)]
[5, 6]

Here is my attempt at this (which obviously doesn't work):

class DatedList(list):

    def __init__(self, values, dates):
        self.dates = dates
        list.__init__(self, values)

    def __getitem__(self, date):
        if isinstance(date, slice):
            start = self.dates.index(slice[0])
            end = self.dates.index(slice[1])
            return [list.__getitem__(self, index) for index in range(start, end)]
        elif isinstance( date, datetime.date ) :
            index = self.dates.index(date)
            return list.__getitem__(self, index)
        elif isinstance(date, int):
            if date < 0:
                date += len(self)
            if date >= len(self):
                raise IndexError, "index out of range {}".format(date)
            return list.__getitem__(self, date)
        else:
            raise TypeError, "Invalid argument type."

The slice[0] and slice[1] are only there to explain my intention. The isinstance(date, int) is only there for debugging - will be removed for production code.

Here is the question: how can I implement slicing that uses datetime.date objects as indices?

EDIT (after gnibblers 2nd comment): I did try getslice too (even though the docs say that getslice is obsolete). The class then looks like this (isinstance-slice bit commented out because of syntax):

class DatedList(list):

    def __init__(self, values, dates):
        self.dates = dates
        list.__init__(self, values)

    def __contains__(self, date):
        return date in self.dates

    def __getslice__(self, fromdate, todate):
        i_from = self.get_index(fromdate)
        i_to = self.get_index(todate)
        print i_from, i_to
        return [list.__getitem__(self, i) for i in range(i_from, i_to)]

    def __getitem__(self, date):
        if isinstance(date, slice):
            pass
#            start = self.dates.index(slice[0])
#            end = self.dates.index(slice[1])
#            return [list.__getitem__(self, i) for i in range(start, end)]
        elif isinstance(date, datetime.date):
            index = self.get_index(date)
            return list.__getitem__(self, index)
        elif isinstance(date, int):
            if date < 0:
                date += len(self)
            if date >= len(self):
                raise IndexError, "index out of range {}".format(date)
            return list.__getitem__(self, date)
        else:
            raise TypeError, "Invalid argument type."

    def get_index(self, date):
        if date in self.dates:
            index = self.dates.index(date)
        elif date < self.dates[0]:
            index = 0
        elif date > self.dates[-1]:
            index = len(self.dates) - 1
        return index

The result is:

>>> print dl[datetime.date(2012,1,3):datetime.date(2012,1,5)]
>>> None

Apparently getslice does not get used at all, because the print is not executed. It appears that getitem is executed when a slice is requested, but I don't seem to be able to use a datetime.date in a slice. /EDIT

Note: apparently it is not a good idea to subclass list, but none of the alternatives I tried so far seemed to work better (or at all):

  • Building a class from scratch: I could not get the [] notation to work:

    dl = DatedList(values, dates)
    value = dl[some_date]       # I want this to work
    value = dl.value(same_date) # I don't want this
    
  • I have considered using a dict, but my list needs to be ordered and I need to use slicing as well.

  • I also tried to subclass collections.Sequence, but that resulted in:

    TypeError: descriptor 'init' requires a 'list' object but received a 'DatedList'

share|improve this question
    
Hint: use the bisect module on a sorted list. –  Li-aung Yip May 21 '12 at 1:03
2  
If you don't need to reinvent the wheel, pandas can already do this. –  Avaris May 21 '12 at 1:12
    
It's ok to subclass list to do this. Alternatively you could use composition. I would write unittests for all the ways you will be using the DatedList. Post your class and any tests you are having trouble getting to pass –  John La Rooy May 21 '12 at 1:48
    
@ Li-aung Yip: I looked through the bisect docs and did not really see how that would help... –  John Peters May 21 '12 at 2:00
    
@Avaris: good suggestion. I see this as a last resort solution, because it feels like shooting a fly with a cannon. I just want to get slicing to work and for that I need numpy. –  John Peters May 21 '12 at 2:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a really simple example, basically you are taking parameters passed to __getitem__ and passing them through a mapping so you can leverage the builting list behaviour.

As you mentioned, __getslice__ is obsolete, __getitem__ just needs to notice that it has been passed a slice and deal with it appropriately.

import datetime
class DatedList(list):

    def __init__(self, values, dates):
        list.__init__(self, values)
        self.dates = dates
        self._dt_to_idx = {k:v for v,k in enumerate(dates)}

    def __getitem__(self, arg):
        if isinstance(arg, slice):
            start = self._dt_to_idx[arg.start]
            stop = self._dt_to_idx[arg.stop]
            return list.__getitem__(self, slice(start, stop, arg.step))
        else:
            return list.__getitem__(self, self._dt_to_idx[arg])    


dates = [datetime.date(2012,1,x) for x in range(2,6)]
dl = DatedList([1,2,3,4], dates)
print dl[dates[2]]
print dl[dates[1]:dates[3]]

If you need a more complicated mapping - to deal with skipped dates, etc, simply define a method to do the mapping and call that whereever you use self._dt_to_idx[...]

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks gnibbler! The arg.start / arg.stop bit is what I needed. Somehow I could not find in the docs how to extract that info from the slice object. The class works as advertised now. –  John Peters May 21 '12 at 4:44

Rather than reimplement this, you might want to check out some of the existing timeseries implementations. Pandas has a pretty good one, as does scikits.timeseries.

As an example, with Pandas:

In [1]: from pandas import Series, DateRange

In [2]: import datetime

In [3]: ts = Series(range(12), index=DateRange('1/1/2000', periods=12, freq='T'))

In [4]: ts
Out[4]: 
2000-01-03     0
2000-01-04     1
2000-01-05     2
2000-01-06     3
2000-01-07     4
2000-01-10     5
2000-01-11     6
2000-01-12     7
2000-01-13     8
2000-01-14     9
2000-01-17    10
2000-01-18    11

In [5]: ts[datetime.datetime(2000,1,10):]
Out[5]: 
2000-01-10     5
2000-01-11     6
2000-01-12     7
2000-01-13     8
2000-01-14     9
2000-01-17    10
2000-01-18    11

Or, you could investigate the source code there and reimplement for your specific case.

share|improve this answer
    
This is how I want my class to work. I get the reinventing wheel comment, but I would like to get my class to work, as it is much lighter than using pandas and having to deal with numpy arrays in my code. I went through the code of series.py of pandas, but I don't understand how they got the above to work. It looks like some numpy magic... –  John Peters May 21 '12 at 2:12
    
+1 for not re-inventing the wheel. –  Burhan Khalid May 21 '12 at 4:09

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