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So, I just got through with a grueling multi-hour debug session of a large server application. The error eventually came down to a barely noticeable typo in a constructor. Basically, it was something like:

template <class T>
class request_handler
{
    public:

    request_handler(T& request, Log& error_log) 
      : m_request(m_request), m_error_log(error_log)
     { 
       /*... some code ... */
     }

    ...
};

See the bug? Well, I didn't. The problem is a small typo in the initializer list: m_request(m_request) is assigning an uninitialized reference to itself. Obviously, it's supposed to read m_request(request).

Now, the member variable m_request is of type T&. So - is there some reason the compiler didn't warn me that I was using an uninitialized variable here?

Using GCC 4.6 with the -Wall flag, if I say:

int x;
x = x;

...it will issue a warning: warning: ‘x’ is used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]

So, why didn't the compiler warn me when I assigned m_request to itself: essentially assigning an uninitialized reference to itself? It would have saved me hours of annoyance.

share|improve this question
    
Did you compile this with full optimizations enabled (-O3)? The compiler will only notice some of these mistakes when it actually does data-flow analysis. Also consider just dropping the m_ prefix. foo(T bar) : bar(bar) is perfectly well-defined. –  xDD May 21 '12 at 1:15
    
At first I was compiling with optimizations. But while debugging, I was compiling with the -g3 flag so I could use the debugger. Even with the g3 flag it didn't issue any warning. –  Channel72 May 21 '12 at 1:29
    
I wouldn't expect -g3 to cause this warning anyway, all it does is dump your symbols. –  xDD May 21 '12 at 1:33
5  
I believe "small typo causes unspeakable pain" is the official motto of C++. ;) –  Jeremy Friesner May 21 '12 at 1:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Annoying bug to track down. It turns out, you don't even need templates to silently fail on this one. This'll do the trick:

class C {
        int a, b;
public:
        C(int t, int z) : a(a), b(z) { };
};

Clang warns on this with -Wuninitialized.

Good news for gcc folks: according to gnu's bugzilla, gcc 4.7.0 has fixed this.

Update

On gcc 4.7.0, add -Wself-init to get this warning (verified by sbellef):

tst.cc: In constructor ‘C::C(int, int)’: tst.cc:4:9: warning: ‘C::a’ is initialized with itself [-Wuninitialized]

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Curiously, I don't see the bug documentation mentioning member references, but maybe the fix handles both cases the same. –  Eitan T May 21 '12 at 1:42
1  
Good point. Anyone with 4.7.0 want to give it a whirl? –  Chris Betti May 21 '12 at 1:49
    
The GCC on my system gcc version 4.7.0 20120505 (prerelease) (GCC) does not seem to report the error. On the other hand, clang reports it properly: clang++ -Wall -c tst.cc tst.cc:4:29: warning: field is uninitialized when used here [-Wuninitialized] C(int t, int z) : a(a), b(z) { }; ^ 1 warning generated. –  sbellef May 21 '12 at 2:26
    
@sbellef, Did you use -Wself-init ? –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 19:51
1  
No I had used -Wall only. Now if I add -Winit-self I get: tst.cc: In constructor ‘C::C(int, int)’: tst.cc:4:9: warning: ‘C::a’ is initialized with itself [-Wuninitialized] –  sbellef May 22 '12 at 3:28

I like to use the trick of using the same name for the members as the constructor parameters.

template <class T>
request_handler(T& request, Log& error_log) 
 : request(request), error_log(error_log)
{ 
  /*... some code ... */
}

This will always prevent the error. You have to be careful though as in the function body request refers to argument, not the member. This of course doesn't matter for simple types such as references, but I don't recommend it for classes.

share|improve this answer
    
That's why it should be T const& request - you only need the argument to initialize this->request, you're not going to modify it. If your use case is more complex, then I recommend against this. But if you're using this pattern consistently in the simple case, the additional benefit is that the pattern becomes recognizable. "Oh, that parameter Foo is there just to initialize Foo. I'm looking into Bar so I don't need to care about Foo" –  MSalters May 22 '12 at 11:26

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