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I realise that this might be a silly question, but is there any way to get Haskell (or use some library with Haskell) to get it to act like an SQL database? If so, how?

Something like SQLite, but without persistence?

The idea is that I could create Haskell "tables" and Haskell "indexes" (stored in memory) and an external application could query them.

It's okay if it can't handle joins.

The reason is that an external application needs to query a database, but I'd like to keep my data in acid-state, and don't want to do the intermediate step of dumping stuff to the database all the time.

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Yes, Haskell can do that. :) If your question was actually "how?", then the answer is much more complicated. –  augustss May 21 '12 at 1:54
    
Question edited augustss. –  Clinton May 21 '12 at 1:58
    
This is straightforward. But you need to pick a protocol, and a transport, and then design an API. JSON over HTTP (possibly with RESTful URLs) is a relatively straightforward choice. –  sclv May 21 '12 at 2:41
    
    
Keep in mind I don't want Haskell to connect to a SQL database, I want the Haskell program to be the SQL database. –  Clinton May 21 '12 at 3:39

2 Answers 2

The idea is that I could create Haskell "tables" and Haskell "indexes" (stored in memory) and an external application could query them.

Sure, no matter what programming language you use, in your application you could expose an interface (probably via sockets or the like) to construct and query data.

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Has someone done this, or should I invent the wheel? –  Clinton May 21 '12 at 11:58
    
I haven't heard of any implementations of a SQL-like language in Haskell, but there are mechanisms for constructing relational data collections and querying them (Via acid-state and ixset for example). –  dflemstr May 21 '12 at 12:49

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