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I'm trying to call a Webservice that consumes a json object with post method .I did it then It wont work again don't know what is the problem.
here is my method

@POST
@Path("/post")
@Consumes("application/json")
@Produces("application/json")
public Response testClient(Client c) throws IOException {
    System.out.println(c.getAdresseCl());
    ResponseBuilder builder = Response.ok(c.getAdresseCl());
    builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
    builder.header("Access-Control-Max-Age", "3600");
    builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "*");
    builder.header(
            "Access-Control-Allow-Headers",
            "X-Requested-With,Host,User-Agent,Accept,Accept-Language,Accept-Encoding,Accept-Charset,Keep-Alive,Connection,Referer,Origin");
    return builder.build();
}

to call this I used this

$.ajax({
  type: 'POST',
  url: "http://localhost:9080/FournisseurWeb/jaxrs/clients/post",
  data: '{"adresseCl":"tunis"}',
  dataType:'json',
  contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", 
  success: function (msg) {
    alert(msg);
  },

  error: function (xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
    alert('error');
  }

});

well I remark that when I set the contentType to application/json the method changes to OPTIONS . and when I don't use the content type I got "415 Unsupported Media Type " I dont know how to fix this. I passed too much time without results :(
thank you for helping me

share|improve this question
1  
What is the domain you're running the AJAX from? In other words, what is the url you're using to load this page? –  jmort253 May 21 '12 at 3:08

2 Answers 2

When attempting to make cross-domain AJAX requests in certain browsers, it is a common to see the HTTP Method change to OPTIONS in lieu of a more meaningful error message.

I noticed in your URL that you're including the protocol, domain, and port, which supports the theory that you're actually trying to make an AJAX request to a different domain/port combination than the originating context.

To clarify, even if your request is originating from localhost and targeting localhost, the ports (9080) and protocols (http) must also match.

Thus, if the page you loaded is "http://localhost:8080" and you're trying to make an AJAX request to "http://localhost:9080", the request will fail, may throw same-domain security errors, 415 Unsupported Media Type, and/or change the HTTP Method to OPTIONS.

One way to make sure you avoid this mistake is to only use full or relative paths when making AJAX requests, such as:

url: "/FournisseurWeb/jaxrs/clients/post",

This forces you to always make requests to the same domain.

Cross-domain Requests

If you do indeed require the ability to make cross-domain requests, this is possible, but only through two methods.

First, you can use a proxy, where you make an HTTP request to your domain and then forward the request onto another server. Servers need not be concerned with same-domain policies when sending and receiving data from one another.

Second, you can use JSONP, also known as script tag remoting, which involves exploiting the <script> element's ability to send requests across different domains.

// added callback= query parameter to convert this to JSONP
$.ajax({
  type: 'POST',
  url: "http://localhost:9080/FournisseurWeb/jaxrs/clients/post?callback=",
  data: '{"adresseCl":"tunis"}',
  dataType:'json',
  contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", 
  success: function (msg) {
    alert(msg);
  },    
  error: function (xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
    alert('error');
  }
});

NOTE: When using JSONP, your server must respond with the JSON wrapped up in a function call identified by the callback parameter. See the jQuery documentation for more in-depth details .

Other than that, you must make AJAX requests to the same domain the page was loaded from.

share|improve this answer
    
yes I see that before sending the request an OPTIONS call is send It's normal now I decided to make it as simple with text/xml and mapped it to objects with jaxb .thanks anyway –  Aymen Taarit May 26 '12 at 0:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

this is the method that consumes a text xml fomat and map it to an object to persist it next

@POST
@Path("/inscription")
@Produces(MediaType.TEXT_HTML)
public Response testClient(String s) {
    ResponseBuilder builder = null;

    try {

        final String xmlString = s;
        final StringReader xmlReader = new StringReader(xmlString);
        final StreamSource xmlSource = new StreamSource(xmlReader);
        final JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext
                .newInstance(Client.class);
        final Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
        final Client client = (Client) unmarshaller.unmarshal(xmlSource,
                Client.class).getValue();
        System.out.println("nomCl  : " + client.getNomCl());
        System.out.println("prenomCl  : " + client.getPrenomCl());
        System.out.println("emailCl  : " + client.getEmailCl());
        System.out.println("numTel  : " + client.getNumTel());
        System.out.println("long_  : " + client.getLong_());
        System.out.println("lat  : " + client.getLat());
        System.out.println("LoginCl  : " + client.getLoginCl());
        System.out.println("PasswordCl  : " + client.getPasswordCl());
        System.out.println("adresseCl  : " + client.getAdresseCl());
        EntityManagerFactory factory;
        factory = Persistence.createEntityManagerFactory("FournisseurWeb");
        EntityManager em = factory.createEntityManager();
        em.getTransaction().begin();
        em.persist(client);
        em.getTransaction().commit();
        em.close();
        factory.close();
        builder = Response.ok("true");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
        e.printStackTrace();
        builder = Response.ok("false");
        builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
        builder.header("Access-Control-Max-Age", "3600");
        builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST");
        builder.header(
                "Access-Control-Allow-Headers",
                "X-Requested-With,Host,User-Agent,Accept,Accept-Language,Accept-Encoding,Accept-Charset,Keep-Alive,Connection,Referer,Origin");
        return builder.build();
    }
    builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
    builder.header("Access-Control-Max-Age", "3600");
    builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST");
    builder.header(
            "Access-Control-Allow-Headers",
            "X-Requested-With,Host,User-Agent,Accept,Accept-Language,Accept-Encoding,Accept-Charset,Keep-Alive,Connection,Referer,Origin");
    return builder.build();
}

I use to call this method using ajax with this sample :

var x="<client><nomCl>Taarit</nomCl><prenomCl>Aymen</prenomCl><emailCl>aymen.taarit@gmail.com</emailCl><numTel>222</numTel><long_>1.66</long_></client>";
$.ajax({
        url: 'http://localhost:9080/FournisseurWeb/jaxrs/clients/cl',
        type: 'post',
        scriptCharset: "utf-8" ,
        dataType:"xml",
        data: x,
        success: function(data, status) {  
        console.log(data);         
        }
    });

this is a jax-rs call with ajax POST using cross domain so hope that it helps :)

NOTE: The cross-domain call without JSONP is legal here because the server is returning the following header, which enables cross-domain AJAX!

 builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");

See Mozilla Developer Center page on Access-Control-Allow-Origin for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Aymen, if you have a solution that is significantly different than what others provided, it's definitely okay to answer your own question, but you should show code and describe in detail what the solution was so that when other users with the same problem find this question from a google search, they'll actually find an answer that helps them solve their problem too. The goal of StackOverflow is to be a repository of knowledge that can help others for years to come. If you don't have an answer that differs from what was provided, then you should delete this. Good luck! –  jmort253 May 26 '12 at 1:00
    
okey ill show the code :) –  Aymen Taarit May 26 '12 at 1:35
    
Thanks for posting that, but I don't think you're actually making this request cross-domain as your browser would throw security errors. Is the website you're making this request from also located at localhost:9080? The only way I can see this working is if the page you're loading localhost:9080 is also the same as the server you're posting to, localhost:9080. –  jmort253 May 26 '12 at 1:46
    
I'm sure that it's a cross domain call because if I dont make the header builder.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*"); it wouldn't work. I'm using localhost:8080 and calling localhost:9080 so it's different –  Aymen Taarit May 26 '12 at 1:50
    
Oh wow! I've never seen that used before and have only heard about it. Very cool! One suggestion though for security, you should consider changing the * to match the origin site; otherwise, other malicious users could also make cross domain calls to your server! Access-Control-Allow-Origin: http://foo.example would allow foo.example` to make calls to localhost:9080. Either way, it depends on whether or not you want everyone to be able to access your site or just one client domain. I'll edit your answer so it's more clear what you did. +1 –  jmort253 May 26 '12 at 1:56

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