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I'm looking at an old helper method which I've been using for a while to trace byte arrays to the output. I wrote it a long time ago and it's been working fine, but I was wondering if there was a better way to do that (with less code). Linq came to my mind, but the solution which I have is awfully inefficient. What I'd need would be something along the lines of a "foreach16", or some enumerator which instead of returning 1 element at a time, returned a group of elements of an enumerable. Besides me creating my own enumerator class, is there a built-in way of doing that?

The examples below have more information on what I'm trying to accomplish.

Original code

    static void PrintBytes(byte[] bytes)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i++)
        {
            if (i > 0 && ((i % 16) == 0))
            {
                // end of line, flushes bytes and resets buffer
                Console.WriteLine("   {0}", sb.ToString());
                sb.Length = 0;
            }
            else if (i > 0 && ((i % 8) == 0))
            {
                Console.Write(" ");
                sb.Append(' ');
            }

            Console.Write(" {0:X2}", (int)bytes[i]);
            if (' ' <= bytes[i] && bytes[i] <= '~')
            {
                sb.Append((char)bytes[i]);
            }
            else
            {
                // non-ASCII or control chars are printed as '.'
                sb.Append('.');
            }
        }

        // flushes the last few bytes
        if ((bytes.Length % 16) > 0)
        {
            // prints spaces where the missing bytes would be
            int spacesToPrint = 3 * (16 - (bytes.Length % 16));
            if ((bytes.Length % 16) <= 8)
            {
                spacesToPrint++;
            }

            Console.Write(new string(' ', spacesToPrint));
        }

        Console.WriteLine("   {0}", sb.ToString());
    }

What I have now - this is what I tried to simplify the code. But I'm doing many Skip/Take, which increases the complexity of the code from linear to quadratic.

    static void PrintBytesV2(byte[] bytes)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; i += 16)
        {
            PrintLineV2(bytes, i, Math.Min(16, bytes.Length - i));
        }
    }

    static void PrintLineV2(byte[] array, int offset, int count)
    {
        Console.Write(
            string.Join(
                " ", 
                array
                    .Skip(offset)
                    .Take(count)
                    .Select((b, i) =>
                        ((i == 8) ? " " : "") +
                            string.Format("{0:X2}", (int)b))));

        Console.Write( 
            new string(
                ' ', 
                (16 - count) * 3 +
                    (count <= 8 ? 1 : 0)) + 
            "  ");

        Console.WriteLine(
            string.Join(
            "", 
            array
                .Skip(offset)
                .Take(count)
                .Select(b => (' ' <= b && b <= '~') ? (char)b : '.')));
    }

Notice that even if the new code as it is were linear, I'd likely stick with the original code since 1) it works; and 2) I think it's more legible. But I can't help wondering whether there is some way of iterating over groups.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK well I'm not sure this is more readable, but here's a solution that uses a Buffer extension method similar to that from Reactive Extensions.

public static IEnumerable<IList<T>> Buffer<T>(this IEnumerable<T> orig, int count)
{
    return orig.Select((o,i) => new { o, i })
               .GroupBy(x => x.i / count, x => x.o)
               .Select(g => g.ToList());
}

Given a block of 16 bytes, turn them into a string (goes at the end of each line):

static string FormatAsString(IList<byte> bytes)
{  
    return String.Join(" ", 
                 bytes.Buffer(8).Select(
                     bs => new String(bs.Select(b => ' ' <= b && b <= '~' ? (char)b : '.').ToArray())
                 )
           );
}

Given a block of bytes (usually 16 wide), turn them into a string representation of those bytes (goes at the beginning of each line):

static string FormatAsBytes(IList<byte> bytes)
{
    var blocks = 
        bytes.Buffer(8)
             .Select(bs => String.Join(" ", 
                bs.Select(b => String.Format("{0:X2}", (int)b)))
             );

    return String.Join("  ", blocks);
}

Now if we turn the input bytes into blocks, then we can just run the above two on the output:

static void PrintBytesWide(byte[] bytes, int width)
{
    foreach (var line in bytes.Buffer(width))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", FormatAsBytes(line).PadRight((width + 1) * 3, ' '), FormatAsString(line));
    }
}

To run with 16 byte blocks:

var bytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes("the quick brown fox");
PrintBytesWide(bytes, 16);

For me this returned basically the same output as your original;

Original:

 74 68 65 20 71 75 69 63  6B 20 62 72 6F 77 6E 20   the quic k brown 
 66 6F 78                                           fox

New:

74 68 65 20 71 75 69 63  6B 20 62 72 6F 77 6E 20    the quic k brown 
66 6F 78                                            fox

But of course the beauty is that you can do different widths!

PrintBytesWide(bytes, 8);

74 68 65 20 71 75 69 63     the quic
6B 20 62 72 6F 77 6E 20     k brown 
66 6F 78                    fox

PrintBytesWide(bytes, 24);

74 68 65 20 71 75 69 63  6B 20 62 72 6F 77 6E 20  66 6F 78                  the quic k brown  fox
share|improve this answer
    
Like the buffer concept and the two FormatAsXXX functions, it made it cleaner. –  carlosfigueira May 21 '12 at 5:41
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LINQ makes code more readable and decoupled from the type of IEnumerable your working with... but by the nature of being an abstraction, it's going to be less efficient than hand crafting lower level code for your specific needs

share|improve this answer
    
True, it won't be as efficient, I was just trying to find something cleaner to write in the same order of magnitude. If a cleaner solution were 2* or even 3* as slow that'd be acceptable, it's just that going from linear to quadratic wasn't an option. Thanks! –  carlosfigueira May 21 '12 at 5:43
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For a foreach16() type implementation, how about this?

var sampleSet = Enumerable.Range(0, 200);
sampleSet.ForEachBlock(16, x => Console.WriteLine(string.Join(",", x)));

...

Using this extension method:

public static void ForEachBlock<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int blockSize, Action<IEnumerable<T>> action)
{
    foreach (var group in source.Select((x, index) => new { x, index }).GroupBy(x => x.index / blockSize, y => y.x))
    action(group);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It would be better form to have an extension method that returned the 'groups' rather than having one that performed actions on them. Actions are side effects, and should be left to foreach blocks in the main code. Having the extension method return groups makes it infinitely more composable. See my answer for an example of that method, in my case Buffer. –  yamen May 21 '12 at 5:24
    
ForEachBlock<T> follows the same pattern as Array.ForEach<T> and List<T>.ForEach - it's just a different approach, and it depends on your purpose as to which approach will be more appropriate for your problem... –  Simon MᶜKenzie May 21 '12 at 5:51
    
I understand. But List.ForEach has for example been removed in certain .NET distributions now for the above stated reasons. Just a note more than anything. The Buffer function you have embedded in there is very useful - better to move it out and use the built in ForEach() on the resulting list if you want. –  yamen May 21 '12 at 5:56
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Here's what you need:

var result =
    String.Join("\n",
        bytes
            .Select((b, i) => new { b, i })
            .GroupBy(x => x.i / 16, x => x.b)
            .Select(bs =>
                String.Join(" ",
                    bs.Select(b =>
                        String
                            .Format("{0:X2}", b)))
                            .PadRight(16 * 3, ' ')));

I tested the above code with "The quick brown fox." (using UTF8) and got this output:

54 68 65 20 71 75 69 63 6B 20 62 72 6F 77 6E 20 
66 6F 78 2E                                     

I was obviously a bit hasty with my first version. This might be a little more complete.

Func<string, IEnumerable<byte>> toBytes =
    x => System.Text.UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(x);

Func<IEnumerable<byte>, string> toString =
    x => System.Text.UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(x.ToArray());

Func<IEnumerable<byte>, string> toHexBlock =
    xs => String.Join(" ", xs.Select(x => String.Format("{0:X2}", x)));

Func<IEnumerable<byte>, string> toHexLine =
    xs =>
        String
            .Format("{0}  {1}",
                toHexBlock(xs.Take(8)),
                toHexBlock(xs.Skip(8).Take(8)))
            .PadRight(16 * 3 + 1, ' ')
        + String
            .Format("{0} {1}",
                toString(xs.Take(8)),
                toString(xs.Skip(8).Take(8)));

var result =
    String.Join("\n",
        toBytes("The even quicker brown fox.")
            .Select((b, i) => new { b, i })
            .GroupBy(x => x.i / 16, x => x.b)
            .Select(bs => toHexLine(bs)));
share|improve this answer
    
The solution is complicated by the fact that the original code prints them in blocks of 8, 2 blocks on each line, and also prints the 'ASCII' version at the end of each line. –  yamen May 21 '12 at 5:22
    
Not exactly what I was looking for, but it's always nice to see a 1-liner (or 1-statement) which does something similar to what I need, thanks! –  carlosfigueira May 21 '12 at 5:41
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