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I am trying to implement the following algorithm using the divide and conquer method in order to get the running time to O(n*logn).

Given a sequence of numbers a_1, a_2,…, a_n and a number k, find i and j such that 1<= j – i <= k while maximizing a_i + a_j.

For example for the sequence 10,2,0,8,1,7,1,0,11 and k = 2, the maximum value is 15 = 8 + 7.

I have implemented some sort of divide and conquer method, but I'm struggling to figure out how to check values that go across each of the divide intervals. Here is what I have so far:

int MaxInterval(int array[], int left, int right, int k)
{
    int BestSum = 0;
    int sumL = 0;
    int sum = 0;
    int sumR = 0;
    int sumMid = 0;
    int count = 0;
    if( right - left <= 2*k-3 ) //
    {
      //elaborate straightforward search right way
      for(int i = left; i <= right; i++)
      {
          sum = 0;
          count = k;
          for(int j = i+1; j <= right; j++ )
          {
              if(count == 0) break;
              sum = array[i] + array [j];
              if(sum > BestSum) BestSum = sum;
              count--;
          }

      }
      return BestSum;
    }
    int mid = (right + left)/2;
    sumL = MaxInterval(array, left, mid, k);
    sumR = MaxInterval(array, mid + 1, right, k);
    sumMid = MaxInterval(array, max(left, mid - k + 2), min(right, mid + k - 1), k);
    return max(max(sumL, sumR), sumMid);
}

I think I am on some-what of the right track, I'm just struggling to figure out how to incorporate check sums of numbers that go across two of the intervals, without using a brute-force method which would yield O(n^2) complexity.

If there are any pointers or tips on how I can continue this, it would be greatly appreciated. Also, I am currently working under the assumption that there is an even number of integers in the array. Thanks guys.

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2  
This problem might be solved in O(N) time, if space complexity O(k) is allowed. Look at home.tiac.net/~cri/2001/slidingmin.html (and there are some topics on sliding window minimum at StackOverflow) –  MBo May 21 '12 at 4:17
    
Thanks for the heads up. I still would like to implement this using a divide-and-conquer method, just to see how it it would work. –  Tesla May 21 '12 at 4:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Some clues in pseudocode. Example for n=8, k = 2 - this code will search the best result from a[0..3], a[4..7] and a[2..5]. Notice that I've removed additional arrays.

int MaxInterval(int array[], int left, int right, int k)
{
    if( right - left <= 2*k-1 ) //
    {
      //elaborate straightforward search right way
      return BestSum;
    }
    sumL = MaxInterval(array, left, mid, k);
    sumR = MaxInterval(array, mid + 1, right, k);
    sumMid = MaxInterval(array, max(left, mid - k + 1), min(right, mid + k), k);
    return max(sumL, sumR, sumMid);
}
share|improve this answer
    
In the if statement, shouldn't it be just "right - left < 2*k - 3" as opposed to the "<=". Since k=3, checking a[0..3] would be checking 4 elements, as opposed to the max of k? –  Tesla May 21 '12 at 15:50
    
We should check k-1 elements left to border, and k-1 elements right to border. 2k-2 elements occupy range [l..l+2*k-3]. For k=3 we need to check 4 elements –  MBo May 21 '12 at 15:59
    
Oh okay, I see now. So a simple, almost brute-force, check just needs to be implemented? Something ala start from left, sum k elements to the right, go to left+1, sum k elements to the right, etc. all the while comparing the sums? –  Tesla May 21 '12 at 16:13
    
Why do you say about (and use in you code) sum of k elements? As I understand, the task is to find pair of elements with max sum and limited distance –  MBo May 21 '12 at 16:33
    
Oh wow, I completely misread that. I was working on a similar algorithm for something else that used k elements, and I got confused. I updated the function to what I have now. I believe it is close, but I'm not there yet. I seem to have with sumMid division when k=2, for example. –  Tesla May 21 '12 at 17:45

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