Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a JSON file with parsed data stored in a @colors instance variable, as follows:

[{:color=>"red", :value=>"#f00"} {:color=>"green", :value=>"#0f0"} {:color=>"blue", :value=>"#00f"} {:color=>"cyan", :value=>"#0ff"} {:color=>"magenta", :value=>"#f0f"} {:color=>"yellow", :value=>"#ff0"} {:color=>"black", :value=>"#000"}]

Now I want to iterate through this output to create a table in a view where there is

<tr><td>color</td><td>value</td></tr>

When I derive another instance variable like this --

@even_colors = @colors.values_at(* @colors.each_index.select {|i| i.even?}).map(&:values)

I get an array of arrays consisting of every other color/value pair

[["red", "#f00"], ["blue", "#00f"], ["magenta", "#f0f"], ["black", "#000"]]

But what I want to create two separate arrays, one consisting only of the color names indicated by :color (red, blue, etc.) and the other consisting of just the hexs indicated by :value (#f00, #00f, etc.). I can't seem to figure out how to do that. Anyone have any suggestions? Thanks ...

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do it with two passes through @colors:

names = @colors.map { |h| h[:color] }
hexes = @colors.map { |h| h[:value] }

Or you could it with on pass:

parts = @colors.each_with_object({ :names => [ ], :hexes => [ ]}) do |h, parts|
    parts[:names].push(h[:color])
    parts[:hexes].push(h[:value])
end

then look at parts[:names] for the color names and parts[:hexes] for the hex values.

I don't really see why you want to split @colors up though, you could produce your table straight from@colors:

<table>
    <% @colors.each do |h| %>
        <tr><td><%= h[:color] %></td><td><%= h[:value] %></td></tr>
    <% end %>
</table>

Breaking @colors into two arrays seems like busy-work to me.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! You're right, I did not need two arrays. Your second suggestion works perfectly. I've seen this syntax before I guess I still haven't internalized it! –  drollwit May 21 '12 at 16:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.