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How can we compare two HTML elements whether they are identical or not ?

I tried this thing but no luck

<div class="a"> Hi this is sachin tendulkar </div>
<div class="a"> Hi this is sachin tendulkar </div>

And then on button click, I call a function check()

var divs = $(".a");
alert(divs.length);    // Shows 2 here which is correct
if (divs.get(0) == divs.get(1)) alert("Same");

But this is not working. Everything is same in two divs. Apart from this How can we compare whether two HTML elements are completely idential or not. Including their innerHTML, className, Id, and their attributes.

Is this doable ?

Actually, I have two HTML documents and I want to remove the identical content from both of them So two elements can have same id.

PS: Updating after Crowder's valuable comments. If we compare two elements as strings, we would not get a match as their order of attributes may vary So the only option is to iterate through each child attribute and match. I still have to figure out completely working implementation strategy.

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2  
"Including their...Id..." If their id values match, the HTML in question is invalid. id values must be unique on the page. –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:30
    
I'm assuming that you do want to treat two elements with the same attributes listed in a different order as equivalent...? E.g., <div data-foo="bar" class="foo">...</div> and <div class="foo" data-foo="bar">...</div> should be a match? –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:35
    
But then they are not identical... –  Derek 朕會功夫 May 21 '12 at 5:36
    
@Derek: Hence the question. –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:37
1  
@Derek: thefreedictionary.com/hence Basically, "Hence the question" in this context means "That's why I asked the question." –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

(See below for a complete, largely-untested, and certainly un-refactored off-the-cuff solution. But first, the bits and pieces of it.)

Comparing their innerHTML is easy:

if (divs[0].innerHTML === divs[1].innerHTML)
// or if you prefer using jQuery
if (divs.html() === $(divs[1]).html()) // The first one will just be the HTML from div 0

...although you have to ask yourself whether these two elements are equivalent according to your criteria:

<div><span class="foo" data-x="bar">x</span></div>
<div><span data-x="bar" class="foo">x</span></div>

...because their innerHTML will be different (at least on Chrome, and I suspect on most if not all browsers). (More on that below.)

Then you need to compare all of their attributes. As far as I know, jQuery doesn't give you a means of enumerating the attributes, but the DOM does:

function getAttributeNames(node) {
  var index, rv, attrs;

  rv = [];
  attrs = node.attributes;
  for (index = 0; index < attrs.length; ++index) {
    rv.push(attrs[index].nodeName);
  }
  rv.sort();
  return rv;
}

Then

var names = [getAttributeNames(div[0]), getAttributeNames(div[1])];
if (names[0].length === names[1].length) {
    // Same number, loop through and compare names and values
    ...
}

Note that by sorting the arrays above, I'm assuming the order of their attributes is not significant in your definition of "equivalent." I hope that's the case, because it doesn't seem to be preserved, as I get different results from different browsers when running this test. That being the case, we have to come back to the innerHTML question, because if the order of attributes on the elements themselves is not significant, then presumably the order of attributes on descendant elements shouldn't be significant. If that's the case, you'll need a recursive function that checks the descendants according to your definition of equivalent, and not use innerHTML at all.

But you should be able to put something together from the pieces above to compare two elements according to your criteria.

More to explore:


The question interested me strangely, so I kicked around at it for a while, and came up with the following. It's mostly untested, could use some refactoring, etc., but it should get you most of the way there. I do, again, assume the order of attributes is not significant. The below assumes even the slightest difference in the text is significant.

function getAttributeNames(node) {
  var index, rv, attrs;

  rv = [];
  attrs = node.attributes;
  for (index = 0; index < attrs.length; ++index) {
    rv.push(attrs[index].nodeName);
  }
  rv.sort();
  return rv;
}

function equivElms(elm1, elm2) {
  var attrs1, attrs2, name, node1, node2;

  // Compare attributes without order sensitivity
  attrs1 = getAttributeNames(elm1);
  attrs2 = getAttributeNames(elm2);
  if (attrs1.join(",") !== attrs2.join(",")) {
    display("Found nodes with different sets of attributes; not equiv");
    return false;
  }

  // ...and values
  // unless you want to compare DOM0 event handlers
  // (onclick="...")
  for (index = 0; index < attrs1.length; ++index) {
    name = attrs1[index];
    if (elm1.getAttribute(name) !== elm2.getAttribute(name)) {
      display("Found nodes with mis-matched values for attribute '" + name + "'; not equiv");
      return false;
    }
  }

  // Walk the children
  for (node1 = elm1.firstChild, node2 = elm2.firstChild;
       node1 && node2;
       node1 = node1.nextSibling, node2 = node2.nextSibling) {
     if (node1.nodeType !== node2.nodeType) {
       display("Found nodes of different types; not equiv");
       return false;
     }
     if (node1.nodeType === 1) { // Element
       if (!equivElms(node1, node2)) {
         return false;
       }
     }
     else if (node1.nodeValue !== node2.nodeValue) {
       display("Found nodes with mis-matched nodeValues; not equiv");
       return false;
     }
  }
  if (node1 || node2) {
    // One of the elements had more nodes than the other
    display("Found more children of one element than the other; not equivalent");
    return false;
  }

  // Seem the same
  return true;
}

Live examples:

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2  
Thanks T.J.Cowder..Gonna try out your solution and will tell how does it work. Thanks a lot btw –  blunderboy May 21 '12 at 5:26
    
How about comparing their outerHTML? –  Derek 朕會功夫 May 21 '12 at 5:32
1  
@Derek: There is no guarantee that two elements with the same attributes in a different order will result in the same outerHTML string. It doesn't work if you wrap and use innerHTML; see my comment on other answers. –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:34
    
@T.J.Crowder - Oh I see. –  Derek 朕會功夫 May 21 '12 at 5:34
1  
@T.J.Crowder—if innerHTML doesn't work on the elements themselves, then it won't work on their content either for the same reason. –  RobG May 21 '12 at 5:50

You can use:

element1.isEqualNode(element2);

In your specific example:

var divs = $(".a");
if ( divs.get(0).isEqualNode(divs.get(1)) ) alert("Same");

The DOM Level 3 Core Spec has all the details. Essentially this returns true of the two nodes have matching attributes, descendents, and the descendents' attributes.

There's a similar .isSameNode() that returns true only if both elements are the same node. In your example, these are not the same nodes, but they are equal nodes.

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2  
This is the best answer. Everything else is just doing string or attribute comparisons. –  Tyson Cadenhead Dec 2 '13 at 21:52
    
This is a good answer only if you don't have to consider attributes. from the referred docs: "The following string attributes are equal: nodeName, localName, namespaceURI, prefix, nodeValue. ". Meaning- no other attributes are tested. –  sJhonny Mar 4 at 16:39
    
@sJhonny The item that starts with, "The attributes NamedNodeMaps are equal," means attributes are tested. –  Keen Mar 4 at 16:53
1  
For the record, isEqualNode is not supported in oldIE. It works in IE9+, though. Other desktop browsers are fine, and mobile browser support is excellent, too. –  hashchange Apr 8 at 14:20

How does this codes?

var d1 = document.createElement("div");
d1.appendChild(divs.get(0));
var d2 = document.createElement("div");
d2.appendChild(divs.get(1));
if (d1.innerHTML == d2.innerHTML) ?
share|improve this answer
1  
There is no guarantee that elements with equivalent attributes in a different order will be sorted by innerHTML. –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:27
1  
And in fact, the attribute order is preserved, by Chrome at least: jsbin.com/amidip So this just does not work (unless, of course, attribute order is significant and a different order should result in no match). –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:33
1  
This has the side effect of removing the divs from the DOM. –  Mike Samuel May 21 '12 at 5:51
    
@MikeSamuel: "Side effect" LOL!! –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:57
1  
@TJCrowder Awesome thing you told about the order of attributes is preserved. Not so easy to observe –  blunderboy May 21 '12 at 6:08

Why not do it the easy way?

<div id="div1"><div class="a"> Hi this is sachin tendulkar </div></div>
<div id="div2"><div class="a"> Hi this is sachin tendulkar </div></div>

if($('#div1').html() == $('#div2').html())
    alert('div1 & div2 are the same');        
else
    alert('div1 & div2 are different');

http://jsfiddle.net/5Zwy8/1/

share|improve this answer
1  
I am not allowed to edit the HTML code So i can not place a wrapper div around the elements. –  blunderboy May 21 '12 at 5:25
1  
There is no guarantee that elements with equivalent attributes in a different order will be sorted by innerHTML. –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:26
    
if you can't place wrapper around, maybe you can use the code i mention + stackoverflow.com/questions/2419749/…. This way you don't need to have a wrapper. –  ephemeron May 21 '12 at 5:26
    
And in fact, the attribute order is preserved, by Chrome at least: jsbin.com/amidip So this just does not work (unless, of course, attribute order is significant and a different order should result in no match). –  T.J. Crowder May 21 '12 at 5:32
    
@blunderboy if you're not allowed to change the HTML code, how are you supposed to achieve the result of removing divs from it? –  Mr Lister May 21 '12 at 6:09

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