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-(Business *) currentBusiness
{
    return _currentBusiness;
}

-(void) setCurrentBusiness:(Business *)currentBusiness
{
    _currentBusiness = currentBusiness;
}

Should it be just like that even for strong properties?

I mean with ARC we don't need to call retain release or whatever right?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

As long as you have declared that the property is backed by that ivar (easiest to do this via @synthesize currentBusiness = _currentBusiness;), yes, this is correct.

I'm assuming you want to do more in the accessor methods than assign/return though otherwise you wouldn't bother implementing them.

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Yea I want to check that the property is called in the main thread. – Jim Thio May 21 '12 at 6:57
    
That sounds messy, it might be worth asking a separate question to check if you are doing the right thing. – jrturton May 21 '12 at 7:27
    
Actually, if you have implemented the getter and setter, as done here, @synthesize will do nothing. The important thing is (in this case) is that the instance variable is also strong (which is the default). – JeremyP May 21 '12 at 8:31
    
@JeremyP synthesize will declare the ivar with the appropriate properties. The question didn't indicate if the _currentBusiness ivar was declared or not, so I assumed not. And this way you don't have to match the ivar declaration with the property type. – jrturton May 21 '12 at 9:02
    
@synthesize creates the accessors. It will also declare the ivar, but if the accessors are provided "manually" using a different ivar, the @synthesize is redundant. – JeremyP May 21 '12 at 12:28

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