Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to Ruby. I am familiar with several other languages. My question is about calling methods out of order. For example:

def myfunction
    myfunction2
end

def myfunction2
    puts "in 2"
end

How could I call myfunction2 before it is declared? Several languages let you declare it at the top or in a .h file. How does ruby handle it?

Do I always need to follow this:

def myfunction2
    puts "in 2"
end

def myfunction
    myfunction2
end

Mainly this bugs me when I need to call another method inside of def initialize for a class.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

You can not call a method before you define it. However, that does not mean you can't define myfunction before myfunction2! Ruby has late binding, so the call to myfunction2 in myfunction will not be associated with the actual myfunction2 before you call myfunction. That means that as long as the first call to myfunction is done after myfunction2 is declared, you should be fine.

So, this is ok:

def myfunction
    myfunction2
end

def myfunction2
    puts "in 2"
end

myfunction

and this is not:

def myfunction
    myfunction2
end

myfunction

def myfunction2
    puts "in 2"
end
share|improve this answer
1  
Note the non-working example can be hammered into working code by adding a BEGIN statement: BEGIN {def myfunction2; puts "in 2";end}. –  steenslag May 21 '12 at 8:17
1  
@steenslag An even better approach would be to add an END statement: END{myfunction}. –  Idan Arye May 21 '12 at 16:39

The only time method order matters is in purely procedural code, and that's usually short-sighted, given two methods:

def greet
  puts "%s, Dave" % random_greeting
end
# If I try to use `greet` here, it'll raise a NoMethodError
def random_greeting
  ["Hello", "Bonjour", "Hallo"].sample
end
# I can use `greet` here, because `random_greeting` is now defiend

This would work ok, unless you wanted to use greet before random_greeting is defined, the way that all non-trivial code solves this is to wrap the behaviour in a class:

class Doorman
  def greet
    puts "%s, Dave" % random_greeting
  end
  def random_greeting
    ["Hello", "Bonjour", "Hallo"].sample
  end
end
Doorman.new.greet

One can then greet one's guests with Doorman.new.greet, by wrapping the behaviour in a class one can model the application better (maybe different objects in your Hotel code give different greetings, for example) and it also keeps the main namespace clean.

The main object in Ruby already has 114 methods defined on it, so it's much better to put your own methods into classes which represent actors or objects in your project's model.

Further to what you said in the question about in initialize of a class, this is completely possible:

class Doorman
  def initialize
    puts "%s, I'm a new Doorman instance" & random_greeting
  end
  def greet
  "%s, Dave" % random_greeting
  end
  def random_greeting
    ["Hello", "Bonjour", "Hallo"].sample
  end
end

Even though the method random_greeting isn't defined when we write initailize, the whole class is defined before initialize is ever called. Again, by wrapping classes, this makes life easier, cleaner and means that things stay encapsulated.

share|improve this answer

Ruby is interpreted language so it don't depend on order of functions, example:

[1] pry(main)> def myfunction
[1] pry(main)*   myfunction2    
[1] pry(main)* end  
=> nil
[2] pry(main)> 
[3] pry(main)> def myfunction2
[3] pry(main)*   puts "in 2"    
[3] pry(main)* end  
=> nil
[4] pry(main)> myfunction
in 2
=> nil

Also if, for example, function calls non existing function then runtime exception will be called only if that function will be called, i. e.:

[5] pry(main)> def foo
[5] pry(main)*   blubry_starego_marycha
[5] pry(main)* end  
=> nil
[6] pry(main)> def boo
[6] pry(main)*   "bom bom bom"
[6] pry(main)* end  
=> nil
[7] pry(main)> boo
=> "bom bom bom"
[8] pry(main)> foo
NameError: undefined local variable or method `blubry_starego_marycha' for main:Object
from (pry):9:in `foo'

As you see I've declared function foo that calls nonexisting function blubry_starego_marycha and Ruby is fine with it, it raise exception only if I call foo.

share|improve this answer

You could define method in any order, the order doesn't matter anything.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.