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One of the things I commonly get hooked up on in ruby is recursion patterns. For example, suppose I have an array, and that may contain arrays as elements to an unlimited depth. So, for example:

my_array = [1, [2, 3, [4, 5, [6, 7]]]]

I'd like to create a method which can flatten the array into [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7].

I'm aware that .flatten would do the job, but this problem is meant as an example of recursion issues I regularly run into - and as such I'm trying to find a more reusable solution.

In short - I'm guessing there's a standard pattern for this sort of thing, but I can't come up with anything particularly elegant. Any ideas appreciated

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can't see no difference using recursion in Ruby compared to other languages. You write the algorithm with two cases in mind, the ones that continue recursion and the base cases that break it. For example, to do a flatten you would iterate the array, and for each element check if it's still iterable (if it's an Array) or not:

class Array
  def my_flatten
    flat_map do |item|
      if item.is_a?(Array)
        item.my_flatten
      else
        [item]
      end
    end
  end
end 

p my_array.my_flatten
#=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

Does this help? anyway, a useful pattern shown here is that when you are using recusion on arrays, you usually need flat_map (the functional alternative to each + concat/push).

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Thanks for the response. I was originally trying with a function outside of a class, which wouldn't recursively call item.my_flatten...but this works. Cheers –  PlankTon May 21 '12 at 7:53
    
@PlankTon. Writing my_flatten as a function requires just some minor changes on the code above. But being a OOP language, and my_flatten a generic algorithm, it makes to sense to add it to Array. –  tokland May 21 '12 at 8:07

Well, if you know a bit of C , you just have to visit the docs and click the ruby function to get the C source and it is all there..

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Array.html#method-i-flatten

And for this case, here is a Ruby implementation

def flatten values, level=-1
  flat = []
  values.each do |value|
    if level != 0 && value.kind_of?(Array)
      flat.concat(flatten(value, level-1))
    else
      flat << value
    end
  end
  flat
end

p flatten [1, [2, 3, [4, 5, [6, 7]]]] 
#=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] 
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Ahh - concat. I was trying to recursively call the function itself, but that'll do it. Cheers –  PlankTon May 21 '12 at 7:55

Here's an example of a flatten that's written in a tail recursive style.

class Array

  # Monkeypatching the flatten class
  def flatten(new_arr = [])
    self.each do |el|
      if el.is_a?(Array)
        el.flatten(new_arr)
      else
        new_arr << el
      end
    end

    new_arr
  end
end

p flatten [1, [2, 3, [4, 5, [6, 7]]]] 
#=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

Although it looks like ruby isn't always optimized for tail recursion: Does ruby perform tail call optimization?

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