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I am sure this would have been asked before but couldn't find it. Is there any built in (i.e. either using std::wstring's methods or the algorithms) way to case insensitive comparison the two wstring objects?

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6  
Note, that case-insensitive comparisons are locale-dependent. –  avakar Jul 1 '09 at 9:24
1  
see stackoverflow.com/questions/11635/… , I'd recommend either the Boost solution or extracting c_str and using wcscasecmp/_wcsicmp –  Hasturkun Jul 1 '09 at 9:35
    
@Hasturkun: Thanks for the link. I vaguely remembered reading this on SO. –  Naveen Jul 1 '09 at 10:04
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8 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If you don't mind being tied to Microsoft implementation you can use this function defined in <string.h>

int _wcsnicmp( const wchar_t *string1, const wchar_t *string2, size_t count );

But if you want best performance/compatibility/functionality ratio you will probably have to look at boost library (part of it is stl anyway). Simple example (taken from different answer to different question):

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>

std::wstring str1 = "hello, world!";
std::wstring str2 "HELLO, WORLD!";

if (boost::iequals(str1, str2))
{
    // Strings are identical
}
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2  
The L encoding-prefix is missing from the string literals –  mloskot Feb 1 '13 at 16:53
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Using the standard library:

bool comparei(wstring stringA , wstring stringB)
{
    transform(stringA.begin(), stringA.end(), stringA.begin(), toupper);
    transform(stringB.begin(), stringB.end(), stringB.begin(), toupper);

    return (stringA == stringB);
}

wstring stringA = "foo";
wstring stringB = "FOO";
if(comparei(stringA , stringB))
{
    // strings match
}
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11  
that if(stringA == stringB) forces me to leave a comment! :) should be return (stringA == stringB) –  Idan K Jul 1 '09 at 9:37
4  
This solution will not work in several locales, in some languages when you convert to uppercase and then back you get different strings. –  Stan Jul 1 '09 at 9:40
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You could use the boost string algorithms library. Its a header only library as long as you're not going to do regex. So you can do that very easily.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_39_0/doc/html/string_algo.html

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Talking about English right ?! though I would go with my lovely Boost :)

bool isequal(const std::wstring& first, const std::wstring& second)
{
    if(first.size() != second.size())
    	return false;

    for(std::wstring::size_type i = 0; i < first.size(); i++)
    {
    	if(first[i] != second[i] && first[i] != (second[i] ^ 32))
    		return false;
    }

    return true;
}
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3  
+1. (second[i] ^ 32) is interesting. I never knew this was how ascii was designed! –  Sahas Jul 1 '09 at 11:38
    
This will consider [ to be the same as {, and * to be the same as a newline, along with many other such inaccuracies. Besides, assuming English when dealing with wide strings is almost certainly wrong. –  interjay Jun 11 '13 at 13:38
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You can use std::tolower() to convert the strings to lowercase or use the function wcscasecmp to do a case insensitive compare on the c_str's.

Here is a comparison functor you can use directly as well:

struct ci_less_w
{
  bool operator() (const std::wstring & s1, const std::wstring & s2) const
  {
      #ifndef _WIN32
            return wcscasecmp(s1.c_str(), s2.c_str()) < 0;
      #else
            return _wcsicmp(s1.c_str(), s2.c_str()) < 0;
      #endif
  }
};
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1  
I think a Standard Library solution was asked for. –  anon Jul 1 '09 at 9:30
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#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <cstdio>


 bool icase_wchar_cmp(wchar_t a, wchar_t b)
{
  return std::toupper(a) == std::toupper(b);
}


bool icase_cmp(std::wstring const& s1, std::wstring const& s2)
{
  return (s1.size() == s2.size()) &&
             std::equal(s1.begin(), s1.end(), s2.begin(),
                              icase_wchar_cmp);
}



int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  using namespace std;

  wstring str1(L"Hello"), str2(L"hello");

  wprintf(L"%S and %S are %S\n", str1.c_str(), str2.c_str(),
              icase_cmp(str1,str2) ? L"equal" : L"not equal");

  return 0;
}
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If you need that the string will always make case insensitive comparation (when using operators == or !=), then a possible elegant solution is to redefine char_traits::compare method.

Define your own structure. Example

struct my_wchar_traits: public std::char_traits< wchar_t>
{
    static int compare( const char_type* op1, const char_type* op2, std::size_t num) 
    {
       // Implementation here... any of the previous responses might help...
    } 
};

Then, define your own case insensitive string:

typedef std::basic_string< wchar_t, my_wchar_traits> my_wstring;
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You can use mismatch() or lexicographical_compare(). This is suggested by Scott Meyers in Effecitve STL, item 35.

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2  
Example for those of us that do not have that book would be nice. –  Stan Jul 1 '09 at 10:01
2  
Note that neither of these functions will compare case-insensitively by default. You would still have to write a function that compares characters case-insensitively and pass it to those functions. –  Geerad Jul 1 '09 at 10:26
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