Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok, I am a bit embarrassed to ask such a simple thing but still.

I have command line utility application and need to show progress to the user.

I could write progress into cout, like this:

std::cout << "10%\n";
...
std::cout << "20%\n";
...
std::cout << "30%\n";

... but as a result user will see:

some line printed before
10%
20%
30%
...

... but what i really need is that percentage got updated, like this at the beginning:

some line printed before
10%
...

... and after update:

some line printed before
20%
...

... and after second update:

some line printed before
30%
...

How should I achieve that?

share|improve this question
3  
Although the answers below are good, it is impossible to say for certain what will work, unless you state the operating system your program runs in. –  Prof. Falken May 21 '12 at 8:09
    
@AmigableClarkKant I need that work both on Linux(Ubuntu) and Windows. –  Eugeny Loy May 21 '12 at 8:16
1  
I think Joachim Pileborgs answer should work fine for these. –  Prof. Falken May 21 '12 at 8:49
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Instead of using '\n', use '\r':

std::cout << "\r10%" << std::flush;

Print newline ('\n') when done.

It's important to use std::flush so the stream contents really is output.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Use a carriage return.

std::cout << "\r10%";
std::cout << "\r20%";
...

Goes to the beginning of the line.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.