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I've got two tables. The first one hold a type and the second one the value of this type. In my example if there are more values 'john' as 'first_name' i get:single-row subquery returns more than one row

SELECT DISTINCT id FROM name WHERE id=(
 SELECT id FROM name WHERE text1='first_name' INTERSECT
 SELECT name_id FROM value WHERE text2='john');

I'm not very good with sql. I should use LEFT JOIN or something like that but it's not really clear to me how i should do this.

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Your query is bad. But please describe what you want to achive so we can write a good one. – Grzegorz W May 21 '12 at 8:18
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Apart from the simple fix (using IN instead of id=), you can also use a somewhat simpler version of your query:

SELECT DISTINCT id FROM name WHERE text1='first_name' 
and id in (
SELECT name_id FROM value WHERE text2='john')
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Since subquery [can] returns multiple values, IN is better use than =

SELECT DISTINCT id 
FROM name 
WHERE id IN (
        SELECT id FROM name WHERE text1='first_name' 
        INTERSECT
        SELECT name_id FROM value WHERE text2='john');

IN is equivalent for OR, example:

SELECT *
FROM tableName
WHERE a = 4 or a = 5 or a = 6

can be written as

SELECT *
FROM tableName
WHERE a in (4,5,6)

The = (equal sign) is used to assign single value.

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SELECT id FROM name WHERE text1='first_name' INTERSECT
SELECT name_id FROM value WHERE text2='john');

This query returns more than one row, then you should use IN clause like here

SELECT DISTINCT id FROM name WHERE id IN (
SELECT id FROM name WHERE text1='first_name' INTERSECT
SELECT name_id FROM value WHERE text2='john');

Or if you expect only a row, you have to review your DB's logic and behaviour.

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Then you should include the IN clause in your query ;-) – Frank Schmitt May 21 '12 at 8:10

you could just change WHERE id= to WHERE id IN

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also you could put a SELECT TOP 1 in - but I'm not sure if you would want to do that? – LordWabbit May 21 '12 at 8:16

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