Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is my code to reverse a string using std::string. But it does not work..

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

main()
{
   string input;
   int i, j;
   cout << "Enter a string: ";
   getline(cin,input);

   string output;
   for(i = 0, j = input.length() - 1; i < input.length(); i++, j--)
      output[i]=input[j];

   cout << "Reversed string = " << output;
   cin.get();
}

But if we replace string output as char output[100]; it works. So std::string does not allow character assignments?

share|improve this question
1  
You should allocate memory for output. – demi May 21 '12 at 8:48
4  
Whoever downvoted this was too cowardly to leave a comment, so just to point out some things that’s wrong with this question which might earn a downvote: you made no effort to format your code properly. Your code is invalid C++ to begin with. Your code isn’t reduced to a minimum to reproduce the problem. – Konrad Rudolph May 21 '12 at 8:49
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have to resize output:

output.resize(input.length());

or initially set length:

string output(input.length(), ' ');

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

main(){
string input;
int i,j;
cout << "Enter a string: ";
getline(cin,input);
string output(input.length(), ' '); // initially set sufficient length
for(i=0,j=input.length()-1;i<input.length();i++,j--)
output[i]=input[j];

cout << "Reversed string = " << output;
cin.get();
}

See also: std::string

share|improve this answer
    
What is the second argument in the constructor of the std::string? Why is it an blank character? :) – Xegara May 21 '12 at 11:06
    
It's character to fill string with. std::string(n, c) gives string of character c n times. – Ruben May 21 '12 at 18:33

std::string allows character assignments, but not beyond the end of the string. Since std::string output; creates an empty string, output[0] is beyond the end of the string.

Presumably this is a learning exercise, but you may as well also be aware of some tools that will do it for you:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

int main() {
    std::string input;
    std::getline(cin,input);
    std::cout << "input: " << input << '\n';

    std::reverse(input.begin(), input.end());
    std::cout << "reversed: " << input << '\n';
}

or:

#include <iterator>
...

    std::string output;
    std::reverse_copy(input.begin(), input.end(), std::back_inserter(output));
    std::cout << "reversed: " << output << '\n';

or:

    std::string output;
    std::copy(input.rbegin(), input.rend(), std::back_inserter(output));

or:

    std::string output(input.rbegin(), input.rend());
share|improve this answer

Because output is an empty string output[i] will access invalid memory location. Simply append the character to the output string using output += input[j].

share|improve this answer

Have a try on the STL algorithm of reverse?

include <algorithm>
// ...
std::string str("hello world!");
std::reverse(str.begin(), str.end());
share|improve this answer

After constructing string output; it have 0 length. You need to resize it to input.length().

string output;
output.resize(input.length());

Resizing is faster then appending char by char, but you have to know the size first.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.