Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an easy self-signed an applet (done with keytool and the jarsigner):

public class NetAppletLauncher extends JApplet {

	private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

	public void init() {
		exec("notepad c:/hello.txt");
	}

	public void exec(String command) {

		try {

			// launch EXE and grab stdin/stdout and stderr
			Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);
			//		OutputStream stdin = process.getOutputStream();
			InputStream stderr = process.getErrorStream();
			InputStream stdout = process.getInputStream();

			// "write" the parms into stdin
//			stdin.write(arguments.getBytes());
//			stdin.flush();
//			stdin.close();

			// clean up if any output in stdout
			String line = "";
			BufferedReader brCleanUp = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(stdout));
			while ((line = brCleanUp.readLine()) != null) {
				//System.out.println ("[Stdout] " + line);
			}
			brCleanUp.close();

			// clean up if any output in stderr
			brCleanUp = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(stderr));
			while ((line = brCleanUp.readLine()) != null) {
				//System.out.println ("[Stderr] " + line);
			}
			brCleanUp.close();

		} catch (Exception exception) {
			exception.printStackTrace();
		}

	}

}

Basically, what it does, is that it executes 'notepad c:/hello.txt'.

Then i embed the applet in html:

<applet id='applet' name='applet' archive='NetAppletLauncher1.jar' code='src.NetAppletLauncher' width='100' height='100' MAYSCRIPT ></applet>

When i visit the page, JRE starts and asks me if i want to start this applet and if i trust it. I press ok. Then notepad starts - as it should. No problem here.

But then i add this into the HTML-page:

<p class="link" onclick="document.applet.exec('calc');">remote desktop2</p>

Now when i press on this text, calc should start - right? But this gives me:

java.security.AccessControlException: access denied (java.io.FilePermission <<ALL FILES>> execute)
	at java.security.AccessControlContext.checkPermission(Unknown Source)
  • whats up with this? Why does it give me a security exception now, but it could start notepad before?
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Actually, calling applet from javascript behaves as calling unsigned applet (as specified in the jsnote: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/deployment/applet/security.html#jsNote. That is fine and is valid when you're using a class you are not allowed to change, but since you're the author of the java class you can always wrap that specific method you need to call from javascript to be executed in the privileged mode, like this:

AccessController.doPrivileged(new PrivilegedAction<String>() {
    @Override
    public String run() {
        exec(command);
        return null;
    }
});

And it should work ok. (This is what is suggested in the upvoted comment by @Jean-Philippe Jodoin but the link provided there is broken)

share|improve this answer

I agree : it is prohibited to manipulate a signed applet from javascript, and the workaround is to rewrite the applet tag in javascript in the page document.

I found this source with a bit of theory proving we are right http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/deployment/applet/security.html#jsNote

share|improve this answer
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Solved the problem with, in Java:

exec(getParameter("command"));

and then in JavaScript:

<script type="text/javascript">

function exec( command ) {

	var applet = "<applet id='applet' style='visibility: hidden' name='applet' archive='NetAppletLauncher4.jar' code='src.NetsetAppletLauncher' width='20' height='20' MAYSCRIPT ><param name='command' value='" + command + "' />Sorry, you need a Java-enabled browser.</applet>";

	var body = document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0];
	var div = document.createElement("div");
	div.innerHTML = applet;
	body.appendChild(div);

}

</script>
share|improve this answer

The Java 2 security model requires (roughly) that every frame on the stack must be granted a permission for the access control context (acc) to have that permission. JavaScript is on the stack and does not have file access permissions.

share|improve this answer
3  
He could also have used the AccessController.doPrivileged API to elevate the privileges of the javascript function call to the one of the signed applet. inf.puc-rio.br/~roberto/java/jdk1.2/docs/guide/security/… –  Jean-Philippe Jodoin Jul 4 '10 at 22:36
    
Thanks a lot, this solved my problem in a nice and clean way. –  boxofrats Dec 11 '10 at 1:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.