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I am doing Box2D programming, and heads up, I am a total noob to C++ and C. I am an Objective-C guy, and that is why it is becoming really hard for me to understand the language. Especially:

->

Basically I understand that this is used for referencing different methods or functions or variables/properties like below:

body->GetWorld()->DestroyBody(body);

So is this equivalent to dot notation in Objective-C:

// made up example
[body.world destroyBody];

or

[self destroyBody:body.world];

Or something similar? I really don't understand this. Can someone give me a heads up on what this is. Thanks!

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1  
AFAIK Objective-C also has ->. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 21 '12 at 9:56
    
-> is from C. –  Pubby May 21 '12 at 9:56
    
Ah, ok its from C. –  MCKapur May 21 '12 at 9:57
    
Objective C is overlay of C ... So you can perfectly use -> in objective C to. –  Victor Carmouze May 21 '12 at 10:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't know Objective-C, but I can explain difference between -> and . in C and C++, hope that helps.

. is operator that allows you to access member of struct/class instance. a->b is the same as (*a).b - so it first dereferences the pointer, then accesses member of instance that the pointer was pointing to.

Also, there is a case that Luchian has mentioned - overloading of operator->() of given class. In case when class you are using does overload this operator, the behavior will be different, defined by the class - it can return virtually everything it wants.

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ok that figures, thanks for the answer! Ill tick in 9 minutes, thats when I can do it –  MCKapur May 21 '12 at 10:01
1  
@RohanKapur this is not always true. –  Luchian Grigore May 21 '12 at 10:09
    
There is totally no operator overloading in objective C ;) –  Victor Carmouze May 21 '12 at 10:46
    
@VictorCarmouze, true, but OP asked about -> in C++ ;) –  Griwes May 21 '12 at 11:00

I don't know much about Objective-C, but I can try to give you some help about C++: assuming that you define a class Foo in C++, with a method bar():

class Foo
{
public:
  void bar();
  ...
};

If you allocate an instance of Foo on the stack, you use dot notation (.) to call the method bar():

Foo f;
f.bar();

If you have a pointer to an instance of Foo, you use the arrow notation (->) to call the method bar():

Foo* pf; // must point to some instance of Foo
pf->bar();

(To complicate things, there are also references, which have value syntax and pointer semantics: if you have a reference to Foo (e.g. Foo& f) you still use dot notation: f.bar();.)

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1  
stack and heap allocation has nothing to do with using -> or .: the only thing that matters is the type of the expression being used. –  akappa May 21 '12 at 10:04
    
@akappa: I just gave some concrete examples to try to explain the concept of dot vs. arrow syntax. I know if you allocate Foo on the stack (Foo f;) and then have a pointer to that same Foo (Foo *pf = &f;) the syntax is still pf->bar();. I try to be as simple as possible in explanations to language beginners, and avoid confusion. –  user1149224 May 21 '12 at 10:18
    
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler". Making examples of a general thing is okay, trying to making a thing simpler by only enumerating some example is terribly wrong and potentially deceptive, especially if you don't say explicitly that those are only examples. For example, he could write something like Foo *x = new Foo(); Foo &y = *x; y->method(); or Foo x; Foo *y = &x; y.method(); and wondering why it doesn't work. –  akappa May 21 '12 at 11:23
    
@akappa: I think your code samples are unnecessary complicated, and not good for the beginning of learning process: they generate confusion (however, I already added a small note on references). –  user1149224 May 21 '12 at 13:11
    
They only generate confusion if you teach by examples and not by concepts, otherwise they are extremely easy to follow. –  akappa May 21 '12 at 13:31

. is used to access object members, -> is used to access members through a pointer. Usually. operator -> can be overloaded, meaning you can also use it on objects:

struct X
{
   X* other;
   X* operator->() {return other;}
};

X x;
x->other;

In this case, x->other doesn't reffer to x.other, but to x.other.other. :D

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Good point about operator overloading, I totally missed it. –  Griwes May 21 '12 at 10:10
    
There is totally no operator overloading in objective C ;) –  Victor Carmouze May 21 '12 at 10:45
    
@VictorCarmouze not saying there is... –  Luchian Grigore May 21 '12 at 10:48
    
Yeah, but it can be confusing. We are speaking about -> in objective C. So, in this case with object in objective C You can't use -> –  Victor Carmouze May 21 '12 at 10:53
    
@VictorCarmouze, we are talking about -> in C and C++, not in Obj-C. –  Griwes May 21 '12 at 13:38

No, using . to access Objective-C properties is not the same as either -> or . to access struct and class members in C and C++.

The Objective-C property accessor works on values of type id (which is a pointer type), but uses special naming conventions to decide what it actually does. It can directly access a property data member, making it similar to -> for data member access. Or it can look up special functions for getting and/or setting the property value, in which case it's syntax sugar for a message send.

Except in the case of operator overloading in C++, -> is always the same as dereferencing a pointer and then accessing the member referred to. a->b is equivalent to (*a).b. b may be a data member for a member function, but the accessed member will have the exact name referred to in b, not some mutation of it based on any special naming convention. If b names a member function then it may be a virtual function, which has some similarities to, but is not the same as, message sends in Objective-C. b may also be an overloaded member function in C++ which has no equivalent in Objective-C.

The addition of the . syntax for accessing object properties in Objective-C violates Objective-C's design principal that new features should look new. Using @, the [] message sending syntax, and the special keywords to define Objective-C objects are examples where Objective-C previously followed this design principal.

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This is objective-c code.

@interface Foo : NSObject
{
  NSInteger _a;
}
@property (nonatomaic, assign) NSInteger a;
@end

@implement Foo
@synthesize a = _a;
@end

You know '@synthesize' phrase. @synthesize create bellow codes.

- (NSInteger)a
{
  return _a;
}


- (void)setA:(NSInteger)aa
{
  return _a = aa;
}

Let's access property a.

void main()
{
  Foo foo = [[Foo alloc] init];
  foo.a = 1;
}

Must assigned foo.a as 1. But compiler call as bellow.

void main()
{
  Foo foo = [[Foo alloc] init];
  [foo setA:1];
}

foo.a = 1 and [foo setA:1] is same. foo.a = 1 calls [foo setA:1].

Bellow, Written in C.

class Foo
{
private:
  int _a;
public:
  int getA();
  void setA(const int aa);
};

int Foo::getA()
{
   return _a;
}
void Foo::setA(const int aa)
{ 
   _a = aa;
}

// local allocation example.

void main()
{
  Foo foo;
  foo.setA(1);
}

// Heap allocation example.
void main()
{
   Foo *foo = new Foo();
   foo->setA(1);
   delete foo;
}

// Pointer (like object objectve-c).
void main()
{
   Foo foo1;
   foo1.setA(1);

   Foo *foo2 = &foo1;
   foo2->setA(2);

   printf("result>>> %d, %d", foo1.a, foo2->a); 
}

result>>>  2, 2

foo1.a and foo2->a is 2 also. Objectve-C example bellow.

void main()
{
   Foo *foo1 = [[Foo alloc] init];
   foo1.a = 1;

   Foo *foo2 = foo1;
   foo2.a = 2;

   NSLog(@"result>>> %d, %d", foo1.a, foo2.a);
}

result>>>  2, 2

Have a good day. Thank you.

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