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I'm trying to do the following:

public abstract BaseClass {

  public virtual void ReceiveEvent(Event evt)
    {
        ProcessEvent(evt as dynamic);
    }

    private void ProcessEvent(object evt)
    { 
        LogManager.Log(@"Received an event that is not being processed! 
                        Dispatch fallback");
    }
}

public DerivedClass: BaseClass {

    private void ProcessEvent(SpecificEvent evt)
    { 
        LogManager.Log("Processing Event");
    }
}

SpecificEvents hit the fallback method instead of the one in the derived class. I use dynamic dispatch within the same class all the time and find it really useful/clean. Will it not work with derived classes as illustrated in the example above?

EDIT: There seems to be some confusion in the answers. Basically i use the following design all the time:

public class SomeClass{

    public void DoSomethingDispatcher(SomeObject obj)
    {
        ProcessObject(obj as dynamic);
    }

    private void DoSomething(SomeObjectType1 obj)
    { 

    }

    private void DoSomething(SomeObjectType2 obj)
    { 

    }

    private void DoSomething(SomeObjectType3 obj)
    { 

    }

    private void DoSomething(object obj) //fallback
    { 

    }
}

Works great for when you don't know the exact type beforehand and you don't want to use a big switch statement. Just wondering if this can be implemented with inheritance where the base class holds the fallback method and the derived class holds all the more specific methods.

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My guess is that the ReceiveEvent is being called on the BaseClass instead of the DerivedClass. Have you tried overriding the ReceiveEvent on the DerivedClass? It's virtual so you can do public override void ReceiveEvent(Event evt) Here's some more info on Virtual methods: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa645767%28v=vs.71%29.aspx –  Davio May 21 '12 at 10:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not working for you because even if evt is passed dynamic, ProcessEvent is not declared as virtual. This means that when the call to ProcessEvent is compiled, it is linked to the only implementation of the method that is found in the base class, and the ones in the derived classes will never be executed. Furthermore, you can't simply declare your ProcessEvent as virtual, since the signature will be different in the derived classes.

In order for your code to work as expected you could just override ReceiveEvent in the derived classes leaving it exactly the same:

  public override void ReceiveEvent(Event evt)
    {
        ProcessEvent(evt as dynamic);
    }

If you want to manage the unhandled events in the base class, just change the modifier of Process event in the base class to protected (otherwise it can't be executed when called by the overridden version of ReceiveEvents).

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Yeah, that is how I have it written now. Guess it's the closest solution. I was hoping I could move the fallback to the base class, but seems it's not possible based on the way you describe the compilation process. Cheers. –  Harry Mexican May 21 '12 at 10:39
    
Oh I just noticed the last paragraph. I will give that a try! –  Harry Mexican May 21 '12 at 11:15

If the method is not virtual/abstract in the base class, and the method is not marked as override in the derived class, it will never work.

Also, I dont understand the usage of dynamic here.

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dynamic here is used as nice way to route unknown object types to their appropriate handlers, without using a switch statement –  Harry Mexican May 21 '12 at 10:25

What is the type of your "evt" when it hit ProcessEvent ?

You may take a look to Using Type dynamic :

The type is a static type, but an object of type dynamic bypasses static type checking. In most cases, it functions like it has type object.

So, evt is not a SpecificEvent.

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I am using dynamic. –  Harry Mexican May 21 '12 at 10:23
    
First, dynamic will be consider as object. Then, your inheritance seems to be incorrect, without "virtual"/"abstract"/"override" ou even "new" on methods. You may try put virtual on the ProcessEvent methods in the BaseClass and override on the DerivedClass. –  kerrubin May 21 '12 at 10:32

To get the expected behaviour you should override the virtual method:

public DerivedClass: BaseClass
{
  private override void ReceiveEvent(Event evt)
  { 
      // Process your event here.
  }
}

With this code, ReceiveEvent in the base class won't be called, thus the fallback ProcessEvent won't be called.

There is no reason to use dynamic.

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