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i am working on amazon s3 bucket. And i need to find a size of the folder inside a bucket through the code. I'm not finding any method to find the size of the folder directly. So is there any other way to achieve this function?

EDIT : I'm aware that there is nothing called folders in s3 bucket. But i need to find the size of all files looking like a folder folder structure. That is, if the structure is like this, https://s3.amazonaws.com/****/uploads/storeeoll48jipuvjbqufcap3p6on6er2bwsufv5ojzqnbe01xvw0fy58x65.png then i need to find the size of all files with the structure, https://s3.amazonaws.com/****/uploads/...

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do you mean the size of the contents of the folder? –  reach4thelasers May 21 '12 at 13:00
    
Yes. Size of contents of all files in the folder and sub folders. –  Udhayakumar May 21 '12 at 13:03
    
Programatically (Which language?) or using a tool (which tool?)? –  reach4thelasers May 21 '12 at 13:11
    
As i tagged, it is on PHP. –  Udhayakumar May 21 '12 at 13:15
    
Helps to put it as part of the question, tags are more for searching on, I often search the amazon-s3 tag for example but I'm not a PHP developer. I see the marked answer user wasn't clear on what language either... –  reach4thelasers May 21 '12 at 13:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From AwsConsoleApp.java AWS SDK sample:

List<Bucket> buckets = s3.listBuckets();
long totalSize  = 0;
int  totalItems = 0;
for (Bucket bucket : buckets)
{
    ObjectListing objects = s3.listObjects(bucket.getName());
    do {
        for (S3ObjectSummary objectSummary : objects.getObjectSummaries()) {
            totalSize += objectSummary.getSize();
            totalItems++;
        }
        objects = s3.listNextBatchOfObjects(objects);
    } while (objects.isTruncated());
    System.out.println("You have " + buckets.size() + " Amazon S3 bucket(s), " +
                    "containing " + totalItems + " objects with a total size of " + totalSize + " bytes.");
}
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Although i need a PHP code, this code gives me some idea about how to write. Thanks. –  Udhayakumar May 21 '12 at 13:21
    
ah, sorry, didn't look at the tags :) –  jimpic May 21 '12 at 13:22

if you would want to use boto in python here is a small script that you may try:

import boto
conn=boto.connect_s3('api_key','api_secret')
bucket=conn.get_bucket('bucketname');
keys=bucket.list('path')
size=0
for key in keys:
        size+= key.size
print size
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1  
I found that s3 sometimes reports folders in this listing which was causing wierd totals. See stackoverflow.com/questions/9954521/…. I ended up filtering out the files with a trailing slash. –  Thomas4019 Feb 16 at 5:54

Folders don't really exist in S3.

An object with a Key of subfolder/myfile.txt is displayed by the software as being in the subfolder folder. But its only a display thing, the folder doesn't really exist. If you want to find out how many items are in that 'folder' programatically, loop through all the objects that start with subfolder/ get their size and add it up. Alternatively Check out S3Browser which gives you the size on right click.

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There is nothing called "folders" in an S3, it is a flat file system. The file names(bucket keys) may contain slashes (/), and various bucket explorers can use this to interpret folder-file structure.

To know the size of a "folder" in S3, you would first have to know the keys of all individual files that contain the substring of that "folder" path. If you bucket contains millions of files, this would be a very costly operation.

Some S3 explorers do that automatically. I use Cloudberry explorer for S3.

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