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I'm trying to build generic function that get from user string and try to parse it to Enum valuse like this:

private Enum getEnumStringEnumType(Type i_EnumType)
    {
        string userInputString = string.Empty;
        Enum resultInputType;
        bool enumParseResult = false;

        while (!enumParseResult)
        {                
            userInputString = System.Console.ReadLine();
            enumParseResult = Enum.TryParse(userInputString, true, out resultInputType);
        }
    }

But i get:

The type 'System.Enum' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'TEnum' in the generic type or method 'System.Enum.TryParse<TEnum>(string, bool, out TEnum)    .

The Error means that i need to decalare a specific Enum for resultInputType? How can I fix this ? Thanks.

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When you say "generic function" - your method isn't generic. Do you need to be able to specify the type as a Type value rather than making this a true generic method? –  Jon Skeet May 21 '12 at 13:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The TryParse method has the following signature:

TryParse<TEnum>(string value, bool ignoreCase, out TEnum result)
    where TEnum : struct, new()

It has a generic type parameter TEnum that must be a struct and that it uses to determine the type of enum that it is parsing. When you don't provide it explicitly (as you did), it will take the type of the resultInputType variable, which is Enum (and not the type of the enumeration itself).

Note that Enum is a class (despite it inheriting from ValueType) and therefore it does not satisfy the requirement that TEnum is a struct.

You can solve this by giving the method a generic argument instead of a Type parameter. The generic type parameter TEnum must have the same constraints (i.e. struct, new()) as the type parameter on the TryParse function.

So try this:

private static TEnum GetEnumStringEnumType<TEnum>()
    where TEnum : struct
{
    string userInputString = string.Empty;
    TEnum resultInputType = default(TEnum);
    bool enumParseResult = false;

    while (!enumParseResult)
    {                
        userInputString = System.Console.ReadLine();
        enumParseResult = Enum.TryParse(userInputString, true, out resultInputType);
    }
    return resultInputType;
}

To call the method, use:

GetEnumStringEnumType<MyEnum>();
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Enum.TryParse is generic... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.enum.aspx –  eyossi May 21 '12 at 13:13
    
That's correct. I never said it wasn't. Its signature is TryParse<TEnum>(string value, bool ignoreCase, out TEnum result) where TEnum : struct, new(), and if you specify result it will use the type of that variable to determine TEnum, saving you from specifying it explicitly. –  Virtlink May 21 '12 at 13:17
    
I get the same error: The type 'TEnum' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'TEnum' in the generic type or method 'System.Enum.TryParse<TEnum>(string, bool, out TEnum). –  Rami May 21 '12 at 13:35
    
You are correct, I had an error. Fixed now. –  Virtlink May 21 '12 at 14:28

You should make a generic method:

private T getEnumStringEnumType<T>() where T : struct, IConvertible
    {
        string userInputString = string.Empty;
        T resultInputType = default(T);
        bool enumParseResult = false;

        while (!enumParseResult)
        {
            userInputString = System.Console.ReadLine();
            enumParseResult = Enum.TryParse<T>(userInputString, out resultInputType);
        }

        return resultInputType;
    }

usage:

public enum myEnum { val1, val2 }

myEnum enumValue = getEnumStringEnumType<myEnum>();
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I get the same erroe: The type 'T' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'TEnum' in the generic type or method 'System.Enum.TryParse<TEnum>(string, out TEnum); –  Rami May 21 '12 at 13:38
    
follow the updated code (i added where T : struct, new()). and look at the usage sample –  eyossi May 21 '12 at 13:43
    
-1: Your code does not compile for three reasons. –  Virtlink May 21 '12 at 14:31
    
You are right... i fixed it now and it works. For the enum constraint i used that - stackoverflow.com/questions/79126/… –  eyossi May 21 '12 at 14:37

Enum.TryParse is a generic method, which means that its generic type parameters have to be known at compile time. This in turn means that yes, you do have to declare resultInputType as a specific enum type for the code to compile.

If you think on it, the original code is a bit too optimistic: nowhere does it say which enum type should be checked for a member with name equal to userInputString. How could TryParse work without this information?

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Long ago in Visual Studio 2005 era, I made my own method for TryParse on Enum. I only recently discovered the 2008 implementation and I'm not happy with it's restrictiveness, especially considering that it's a TRY PARSE method; meaning that a programmer is testing an input!

Generally, I prefer to use methods which trust the programmer to know what he's doing :)

My implementation is as follows:

public static bool EnumTryParse<T>(string input, out T theEnum)
{
    foreach (string en in Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)))
    {
        if (en.Equals(input, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
        {
            theEnum = (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), input, true);
            return true;
        }
    }

    theEnum = default(T);
    return false;
}

The lack of a where T:struct puts the trust in the developer's hands, but it allows you to compile with unknown, generic enums.

As an alternative, you can create a method looping on Enum.GetValues if you want to do an integer comparison when converting to your specified enum.

Hope this helps.

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