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Integer.parseInt("-1000");

returns -1000 as the output

Integer.parseInt("+500");

throws an exception

How will i be able to recognize, the positive numbers with the "+" symbol before them without having to trim the symbol ?

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1  
What's the problem with trimming the symbol? –  Andrew Logvinov May 21 '12 at 13:13
    
That you shouldn't have to? –  Arran Cudbard-Bell Jun 22 '14 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try DecimalFormat like with the pattern "+#;-#". It will handle explicit signed parsing. Breakdown of the pattern:

  • The first part (before ;) is the positive pattern, it has to start with an + char
  • The second part is the negative and has to start with a - char

Example:

DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("+#;-#");
System.out.println(df.parse("+500"));
System.out.println(df.parse("-500"));

Outputs:

500
-500
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The method is behaving as described in the documentation:

The characters in the string must all be decimal digits, except that the first character may be an ASCII minus sign '-' ('\u002D') to indicate a negative value.

You need to skip the first character if it is a + to do the parse correctly:

if (s.charAt(0) == '+') s = s.substring(1);
int val= Integer.parseInt(s);
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2  
The OP says "without having to trim the symbol ?" –  aioobe May 21 '12 at 13:22
1  
Yes i meant without having to handle the "+" symbol explicitely. Any way thanks for answering. I think the decimal format answer will suit. –  Achilles May 21 '12 at 13:40
1  
@Achilles Yeah, the DecimalFormat one is a good answer indeed. –  dasblinkenlight May 21 '12 at 13:42

One option is to use Java 7... assuming that behaves as documented:

Parses the string argument as a signed decimal integer. The characters in the string must all be decimal digits, except that the first character may be an ASCII minus sign '-' ('\u002D') to indicate a negative value or an ASCII plus sign '+' ('\u002B') to indicate a positive value.

It looks like this was a new feature introduced into Java 7 though. The JDK 6 docs only indicate that - is handled.

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I am using Java 7, and Integer.parseInt("+500"); is not throwing any exception.

The characters in the string must all be decimal digits, except that the first character may be an ASCII minus sign '-' ('\u002D') to indicate a negative value or an ASCII plus sign '+' ('\u002B') to indicate a positive value.

Java 7 documentation for Integer.parseInt(String)

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I am using java 6 ! –  Achilles May 21 '12 at 13:35
    
in case of java 6 only "-" is handled. so u can change your jre or change in ur code . –  Sumit Singh May 22 '12 at 6:00

public static int parseInt(String s) throws NumberFormatException

Parses the string argument as a signed decimal integer. The characters in the string must all be decimal digits, except that the first character may be an ASCII minus sign '-' ('\u002D') to indicate a negative value. The resulting integer value is returned, exactly as if the argument and the radix 10 were given as arguments to the parseInt(java.lang.String, int) method.

Javadoc

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