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The following code works properly

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Working</title>
<style type="text/css">
html {
  height: 100%;
}
body {
  height: 100%; /* !!!!! difference in here */
}
div#main {
  min-height: 100%;
  background-color: red;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="main"></div>
</body>

while a code using min-height instead of height for body prevents #main from occupying space

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Not working</title>
<style type="text/css">
html {
  height: 100%;
}
body {
  min-height: 100%; /* !!!!! difference in here */
}
div#main {
  min-height: 100%;
  background-color: red;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="main"></div>
</body>

Weird thing is when doing an inspect in chrome, in both cases body properly takes up 100% space. In min-height case however the child element min-height: 100%; translates to 0. Why does it happen and is there any workaround? I would like the min-height for my web page for background to work properly and expand as needed.

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Are you overlaying backgrounds of body and #main? Is that why you need both to expand with content? –  ScottS May 21 '12 at 13:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As to "Why does it happen?"

The min-height property only works if an explicit height is set. The spec reads for a percentage:

Specifies a percentage for determining the used value. The percentage is calculated with respect to the height of the generated box's containing block. If the height of the containing block is not specified explicitly (i.e., it depends on content height), and this element is not absolutely positioned, the percentage value is treated as '0' (for 'min-height') or 'none' (for 'max-height').

The key point in that is that "If the height of the containing block is not specified explicitly (i.e., it depends on content height)." When body is set with min-height, it is still depending on content height for calculation, only it does not allow it to fall below the specified size (in your case, 100% of html height which is explicitly set). However, because body is still depending on content to set its height, then div#main cannot calculate min-height because body does not have an explicit height set.

Is a "Workaround" Needed?

It seems that setting body to height: 100% achieves all you want. Whether content is long or content is short.

Response to Comment on html change of background-color

I suspect the reason your fiddle with html having background-color set changes things is because of the notations in this spec (quoted below). By setting that on html it changes the canvas rendering itself:

The background of the root element becomes the background of the canvas and covers the entire canvas, anchored (for 'background-position') at the same point as it would be if it was painted only for the root element itself. The root element does not paint this background again.

For HTML documents, however, we recommend that authors specify the background for the BODY element rather than the HTML element. For documents whose root element is an HTML "HTML" element or an XHTML "html" element that has computed values of 'transparent' for 'background-color' and 'none' for 'background-image', user agents must instead use the computed value of the background properties from that element's first HTML "BODY" element or XHTML "body" element child when painting backgrounds for the canvas, and must not paint a background for that child element. Such backgrounds must also be anchored at the same point as they would be if they were painted only for the root element.

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Thanks, certainly answers that part of my question. The workaround part is still needed. ... or maybe I just need a different layout. –  RushPL May 21 '12 at 13:52
    
@RushPL--see my addition (and fiddle links with it). I think setting explicit height on body to 100% does what you would need. –  ScottS May 21 '12 at 14:02
    
I was a bit amazed of your solution having worked as I would swear I tried something similiar without success. I tracked the problem down to html { background-color: #111111; } which I illustrate over here jsfiddle.net/eevq6 Thanks a lot for helping out! Still a bit weird behaviour of background-color in the html element. You can uncomment background-color from html to see proper behaviour. –  RushPL May 21 '12 at 15:01
    
@RushPL--added to my answer what I think is the explanation as to why setting the background-color on html created "weird behaviour." –  ScottS May 21 '12 at 15:26
    
This is awkwardly limiting, since height 100% on the html element required for body min-height does not expand over the whole page when the content overflows. –  mystrdat Sep 20 '12 at 10:58

Try putting an &nbsp; inside the <div id="main"/> tag.

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you obviously didn't try this yourself. –  Faust May 21 '12 at 13:46

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