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I have a co worker who wrote the following query. The first one works and the second one does not. Also if you remove the aggregate function from the subquery, it works. The oracle optimizer is doing something weird. Any thoughts? Running in SQL Developer 3.1 against 11.1.0.6.0 64 bit.

This works:

SELECT
  a.fd_customer_key
, b.fd_customer_key
, b.counter
FROM FETCH_CUSTOMER a
, (select fd_customer_key, count(*) as counter from fetch_customer_order group by fd_customer_key) b
where a.fd_customer_key = b.fd_customer_key (+)
and b.counter is null

This doesn’t:

SELECT
a.fd_customer_key
, b.fd_customer_key
, b.counter
FROM FETCH_CUSTOMER a
, (select fd_customer_key, count(*) as counter from fetch_customer_order group by fd_customer_key) b
 where a.fd_customer_key = b.fd_customer_key (+)
 and b.fd_customer_key is null
share|improve this question
    
when we say it doesn't work, we mean that it is not returning any rows. –  jcourtjr May 21 '12 at 13:44
    
This also works SELECT a.fd_customer_key , b.fd_customer_key FROM FETCH_CUSTOMER a ,(select fd_customer_key, 1 from fetch_customer_order group by fd_customer_key) b where a.fd_customer_key = b.fd_customer_key (+) and b.fd_customer_key is null; –  jcourtjr May 21 '12 at 17:43
    
This does not work SELECT a.fd_customer_key , b.fd_customer_key FROM FETCH_CUSTOMER a ,(select fd_customer_key, sum(1) from fetch_customer_order group by fd_customer_key) b where a.fd_customer_key = b.fd_customer_key (+) and b.fd_customer_key is null; –  jcourtjr May 21 '12 at 17:44
    
Are you sure this isn't an Oracle bug? If you're getting weird inconsistent behaviour then a bug seems likely. There are lots of them out there. If it's a bug, you really need to contact Oracle support or your DBA. –  Mike Meyers May 22 '12 at 7:09
    
See the answer from Vincent Malgrat below. If you take his example and put an index on table b you reproduce the error. The optimizer is doing something that may not be a bug but it is not expected behavior either (at least by us). –  jcourtjr May 22 '12 at 15:06
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems like you are trying to make an anti-join (find the rows from FETCH_CUSTOMER that have no corresponding rows in FETCH_CUSTOMER_ORDER).

With Oracle you do not have to use this clever OUTER JOIN trick to write an anti-join, you could use a NOT IN or NOT EXISTS operator and let the optimizer find the best plan. This will be just as efficient and easier to read.

Anyway, I can't reproduce your findings, here's my setup:

CREATE TABLE a (ID NUMBER PRIMARY KEY);
CREATE TABLE b (a_id NUMBER NOT NULL, DATA VARCHAR2(30));
INSERT INTO a (SELECT object_id FROM all_objects);
INSERT INTO b (SELECT object_id, object_name 
                 FROM all_objects WHERE object_type = 'VIEW');

SELECT a.id, b.a_id, b.cnt
  FROM a, (SELECT a_id, COUNT(*) cnt FROM b GROUP BY a_id) b
 WHERE a.id = b.a_id (+)
   AND b.cnt IS NULL;

SELECT a.id, b.a_id, b.cnt
  FROM a, (SELECT a_id, COUNT(*) cnt FROM b GROUP BY a_id) b
 WHERE a.id = b.a_id (+)
   AND b.a_id IS NULL;

You will find that both queries return rows. What is your DB version?

share|improve this answer
    
I did try your above example and it does indeed return rows in both case. Version is 11g. I added another example above where the aggregate is causing the problem. –  jcourtjr May 21 '12 at 17:42
    
Add a non unique index on the b.a_id field. 'Poof' results are gone on your second query. –  jcourtjr May 22 '12 at 14:49
    
This must be a bug with your version: I tested it on 9.2.0.5 and 11.2.0.3.0 and the two queries return the same result. –  Vincent Malgrat May 23 '12 at 8:02
    
It looks very much like bug #13074262 on Metalink. Are you in 11.2.0.1? –  Vincent Malgrat May 23 '12 at 8:13
    
11.1.0.6.0 64 bit. So even with the index you can't reproduce the problem? –  jcourtjr May 23 '12 at 12:30
show 3 more comments

Actually yes, both of the queries you provided are supposed to wrok the same way, but if i understand your need well, you are trying to select the fd_customer_key which has no Order?

I suggest the following query for your need, its more simple and less consuming :

SELECT a.fd_customer_key
  FROM FETCH_CUSTOMER a
 WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1
          FROM fetch_customer_order b
         WHERE a.fd_customer_key = b.fd_customer_key)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 because it doesn't use the weird, old and error-prone (+) syntax. +2 because it uses a EXISTS instead of a COUNT(*) as it will probably be better for performance. The OP needs to find if a related row exists or not. No need for counting if there are 1,2,3 or 65042 related rows. –  ypercube May 21 '12 at 14:45
    
This is a better way to do it but we are just trying to illustrate an unexpected issue we are finding with Oracles query optimization. –  jcourtjr May 22 '12 at 15:07
    
@john: "unexpected issue" has high correlation with "weird, old and error-prone (+) syntax" –  ypercube May 25 '12 at 12:30
    
@ypercube: This has nothing to do with the old join syntax. Same thing has been replicated using join keywords. –  jcourtjr Jun 11 '12 at 18:35
    
@jcourtjr: Can you post the example query? –  ypercube Jun 11 '12 at 21:05
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