Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create two interface hierarchies, one for the business model objects and one for the ui. I know it's important to have loose coupling between the layers but part of the application will require drawing diagrams so I need the model objects to be readily available to their corresponding graphical representations and I have a common layer holding interfaces for the model objects..

Common class library code:

public interface IBase {}
public interface IBookObject : IBase {}
public interface ITapeObject : IBase {}

public class Book : IBookObject {}

Graphics layer code:

public interface IModelObject<T> 
{
  T ModelObject { get; set; } // might be a book or tape , etc
}

public class GraphicObject<T> : IModelObject<T>
{
  public T ModelObject { get; set; }
}

Code use:

IBookObject bk = new Book();
var go = new GraphicObject<IBookObject>(); // will fail later
//var go = new GraphicObject<IBase>(); // will succeed later

go.ModelObject = bk;

if (go is IModelObject<IBase>) // can't use is IModelObject<IBookObject>
                               // as go might be GraphicObject<ITapeObject>
{
  Debug.WriteLine("Success");
}

So if I want to test for IBase (and then access ModelObject), I have to make sure that the original object was created with IBase and not a derived interface, and this seems like a cause of bugs later. my questions are:

1) Am I doing something horrible?! :) I might be overlooking a better approach..

2) failing that, is there some way of using the new contravariance c# 4 techniques to make the is line test for any interface deriving from IBase? Alternatively I think it would work if IBook didn't inherit from IBase, but Book (and Tape) implemented both IBook and IBase separately.

3) failing that, is there any way to prevent construction of GraphicObject<IBookObject>() and GraphicObject<ITapeObject>()?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
1  
Don't forget to add where T : IBase in the IModelObject<T> interface declaration. –  ja72 May 21 '12 at 13:54
    
So you want to have GraphicalObject<T> only instanciated with IBase? If so, then why use generics here? –  weston May 21 '12 at 13:55
    
I'd suggest to design workflow without both generics and parent interfaces, and then identify relationships in a 'real' code. –  mikalai May 21 '12 at 14:02
    
I am voting to close the question as not a real question, since requirements are not given for a proper answer (see comment chain in proposed answer). –  ja72 May 22 '12 at 11:57
    
That's fine with me. Thanks to your assistance I now realise the scope of the question is expanding to a very broad request for a way for GraphicObject to handle an object of unknown type. –  Sean Donohue May 22 '12 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

Would this work?

public interface IBase { }
public interface IBookObject : IBase { }
public interface ITapeObject : IBase { }

public class Book : IBookObject { }

public interface IModelObject
{
    IBase ModelObject { get; set; } // might be a book or tape , etc
}


public class GraphicObject<T> : IModelObject
    where T: class, IBase
{
    public T ModelObject { get; set; }

    #region IModelObject Members

    IBase IModelObject.ModelObject
    {
        get
        {
            return ModelObject;
        }
        set
        {
            ModelObject=value as T;
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IBookObject bk=new Book();

        var go=new GraphicObject<IBookObject>(); // will fail later

        //var go = new GraphicObject<IBase>(); // will succeed later

        go.ModelObject=bk;

        if(go is IModelObject) // can't use is IModelObject<IBookObject> as go might be GraphicObject<ITapeObject>
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Success");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thank you but I realise I should have said that I hope to make the Graphics library a re-usable component. This also answers the comment questions why imodelobject is not constrained to Ibase - I would rather be able to say "make a diagram of generic type bank_account". This solution would work but slightly tightens the coupling between the view and the model.. –  Sean Donohue May 21 '12 at 19:18
    
But then what is a "generic bank account" if there is no base object. Your choices are to use interfaces or reflection. –  ja72 May 21 '12 at 23:31
    
Well, I was going to use a property grid to show the underlying model data, and that just takes an object. So the model type referenced by GraphicObject doesn't have be an interface, it could be a concrete class. I want to leave to the model implementer to decide what their type hierarchy is, whether that be a struct or a group of classes with a common interface or class. –  Sean Donohue May 22 '12 at 9:49
    
So your GraphicsObject should work for all object types, and you are giving us no information on how to do that. I am voting to close the question then, as it is not a real question. –  ja72 May 22 '12 at 11:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.