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I'm writing a batch file for Windows and use the command 7z (7-Zip). I have put the location of it in the PATH. Is there a relatively easy way to check whether the command is available?

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Don't execute.The best way IMO would be: stackoverflow.com/a/27014081/1724702 – Sachin Joseph Feb 15 '15 at 17:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

An attempt to execute 7z.exe will return an %errorlevel% of 9009 if the command is not found. You can check that.

7z.exe
if %errorlevel%==9009 echo Command Not Found
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A nicer way would be 7z.exe >nul 2>&1 | echo Command not found, I guess. – Joey Nov 27 '12 at 21:20
    
The best way IMO would be: stackoverflow.com/a/27014081/1724702 – Sachin Joseph Nov 19 '14 at 10:10

I would not recommend executing the command to check whether it is available for use (say, available in PATH environment variable). So I think the best approach would be using the wherecommand:

where 7z.exe >nul 2>nul
if %errorlevel%==1 (
    @echo 7z.exe not found in path.
    [do something about it]
)

The >nul and 2>nul are optional; used here to prevent the display of the standard output and standard error output generated by where command.

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Yup,

@echo off
set found=
set program=7z.exe
for %%i in (%path%) do if exist %%i\%program% set found=%%i
echo "%found%"
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This won't work with quoted paths that contain spaces. – Joey May 21 '12 at 14:14
    
Thanks, why do you say set found=? – rynd May 21 '12 at 14:46
    
@Joey there is an easy fix for that. Use double quotes. However, this wont work if the extension of command (exe, bat) is not specified while the accepted solution will. – khattam Nov 27 '12 at 16:56

Yes, open a command window and type "7z" (I assume that is the name of the executable). If you get an error saying that the command or operation is not recognised then you know the path statement has a problem in it somewhere, otherwise it doesn't.

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