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I'm writing a Chrome extension with the socket api(though this doc is out of date, the latest version of the api is here), and I found that the code is really hard to organize:

All the methods are under the namespace chrome.experimental.socket, I would just use socket below for simplicity.

socket.create("tcp", {}, function(socketInfo){
    var socketId = socketInfo.socketId;

    socket.connect(socketId, IP, PORT, function(result){
        if(!result) throw "Connect Error";        

        socket.write(socketId, data, function(writeInfo){
            if(writeInfo.bytesWritten < 0) throw "Send Data Error";

            socket.read(socketId, function(readInfo){
                if(readInfo.resultCode < 0) throw "Read Error";
                var data = readInfo.data; // play with the data
                // then send the next request
                socket.write(socketId, data, function(writeInfo){
                    socket.read(socketId, function(readInfo){
                        // ............
                    });
                });
            });
        })
    });
})

because both socket.write and socket.read are asynchronous, I have to nest the callbacks to make sure that the next request is send after the previous request got the correct response.

it's really hard to manage these nested functions, how could I improve it?

UPDATE

I'd like to have a method send which I can use as:

send(socketId, data, function(response){
    // play with response
});
// block here until the previous send get the response
send(socketId, data, function(response){
    // play with response
});
share|improve this question
    
Possible dupe of stackoverflow.com/questions/8302218/… –  GRIGORE-TURBODISEL May 21 '12 at 16:37
1  
@GRIGORE-TURBODISEL are you serious? –  wong2 May 21 '12 at 17:22
    
Yea man, com' on. That's what I got from // block here until the previous send get the response. –  GRIGORE-TURBODISEL May 21 '12 at 17:36
1  
@GRIGORE-TURBODISEL I've seen that question and I have to say that it's very different from mine. –  wong2 May 21 '12 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Consider using an asynchronous continuation passing style, where functions end with a SetInterval call with the function they were passed. Then we construct a function that entwines two functions to call each other using this mechanism. The guts of it would be like this:

var handle;
// pairs two functions
function pair(firstfunc, secondfunc, startarg) {
  var callbackToFirst = function(valuetofill) {
    handle = setInterval(firstfunc(valuetofill,callbackToSecond));
  };
  var callbackToSecond = function(valuetofill) {
    handle = setInterval(secondfunc(valuetofill,callbackToFirst));
  };

  callbackToFirst(startarg);
}

What we are doing here is constructing a pair of mutually-calling callbacks which take a single argument, which each contain references to the two inter-calling functions. We then kick off the process by calling the first callback.

Construct the pair for an example pair of read and write functions (assuming you've set the socketId in the enclosing object definition):

// starts read/write pair, sets internal variable 'handle' to 
//   interval handle for control
function startReadWrite(initialarg, myDataFunc) {
    var readcall = function(value, func) {
        readSocket(getData(myDataFunc(func)));
    };
    var writecall = function(value, func) {
        writeSocket(checkBytesWritten(func));
    };
    handle = pair(readcall, writecall, initialarg);
}

The rest of the object is like this:

function myIO() {
    var socketInfo, socketId, handle;

    function create(func) {
        socket.create('tcp',{},function(thisSocketInfo) {
            socketInfo = thisSocketInfo;
        }
        setInterval(func(this),0);
    }

    function connect(IP, PORT, func) {
        socket.connect(p_socketId, IP, PORT, function() {
            if(!result) throw "Connect Error";
                setInterval(func(result),0);
            });
    }

    function readSocket(func) {
        socket.read(p_socketId, function(readInfo){ 
            setInterval(func(readInfo),0);
        });
    }

    function writeSocket(data, func) {
        socket.write(p_socketId, data, function(writeInfo){
            setInterval(func(writeInfo),0)
        });
    }

    function checkBytesWritten(writeInfo, func) {
        if(writeInfo.bytesWritten < 0) throw "Send Data Error";
        setInterval(func(writeInfo),0);
    }

    function getData(readInfo, func) {
        if(readInfo.resultCode < 0) throw "Read Error";
        var data = readInfo.data;
        setInterval(func(data),0);
    }


    //** pair and startReadWrite go here **//

}

Finally the call to set the whole thing going:

var myIOobj = new myIO();
myIOobj.create(startReadWrite(myDataFunc));

Notes:

  1. This is meant to demonstrate a style, not be ready code! Don't just copy and paste it.
  2. No, I haven't tested this; I do javascript but not Chrome API stuff yet. I'm focussing on the callback mechanisms etc.
  3. Be careful with the different classes of callback; single argument callbacks (like the read and write callbacks) which take a single value (as presumably defined by the API), and 2 argument callbacks (like most of the methods) which take an argument and a function to call at the end.
  4. The getData method takes a callback and passes data to it; this callback (myDataFunc) is the function that actually gets to use the data. It needs to take a callback as a second argument and call it synchronously or asynchronously.

TLDR: Consider using asynchronous calls to avoid the nesting. I've given a vague example of a mechanism to have two functions call each other continuously using this style as seems to be needed.

Although I call it asynchonous, the setInterval calls will execute serially, but the key is that the stack is cleared after the parent call is done, rather than adding endless layers with nesting.

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How about (something like) this?

var MySocket = {
  obj: null,
  data: null,
  start: function() { ... some code initializing obj data, ending with this.create() call },
  create: function() { ... some code initializing obj data, ending with this.connect() call },
  connect: function() { ... some connection code, ending with this.write() call },
  write: function() { ... some writing code that updates this.data, ending with this.read() call },
  read: function() { ... you probably get the idea at this point )) ... },
};

This object could be used with MySocket.start() or something. The idea is to encapsulate all data (and nested calls) within the single (yet more-o-less globally usable) object.

Or even more, one can create two objects: one purely for writing purposes, and another for purely reading, each operating with its own data, then wrap them (and their inter-calls, so to speak) into a single SocketManager object.

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