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In bash I frequently make scripts where I loop over a list of strings that I define.

e.g.

for a in 1 2 3 4; do echo $a; done

However I would like to define the list (before the loop to keep it clean) so that it contains spaces and with out a separate file:

e.g. (BUT THIS WILL NOT WORK)

read -r VAR <<HERE
list item 1
list item 2
list item 3
...
HERE

for a in $VAR; do echo $a; done

The expected output above (I would like):

list item 1
list item 2
list item 3
etc...

But you will get:

list
item
1

I could use arrays but I would have to index each element in the array (EDIT read answers below as you can append to arrays.. I did not know you could).

How do others declaratively define lists in bash with out using separate files?

Sorry I forgot to mention I want to define the list at the top of the file before the for loop logic

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It would be more helpful if you also specified how what you tried didn't work. –  unwind May 21 '12 at 14:36
    
@unwind I updated the question. –  Adam Gent May 21 '12 at 14:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Arrays aren't so hard to use:

readarray <<HERE
this is my first line
this is my second line
this is my third line
HERE

# Pre bash-4, you would need to build the array more explicity
# Just like readarray defaults to MAPFILE, so read defaults to REPLY
# Tip o' the hat to Dennis Williamson for pointing out that arrays
# are easily appended to.
# while read ; do
#    MAPFILE+=("$REPLY")
# done

for a in "${MAPFILE[@]}"; do
    echo "$a"
done

This has the added benefit of allowing each list item to contain spaces, should you have that need.

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1  
is MAPFILE correct? I'm just wondering that readarray is not referenced. –  Jan-Philip Gehrcke May 21 '12 at 14:48
    
Sorry, I should have made that clear. If you don't specify an array for readarray, MAPFILE is used by default. (mapfile is another name for the readarray command.) –  chepner May 21 '12 at 14:49
1  
Requires Bash 4. –  Dennis Williamson May 21 '12 at 14:50
    
I like @chepner's answer best as I want to define the list/array before the for loop. I don't mind that it requires a newer bash as its for my own uses. –  Adam Gent May 21 '12 at 14:54
    
I've updated to include a quick replacement for readarray, should you find yourself using an old bash (such as ships with Mac OS X). –  chepner May 21 '12 at 14:56

You can use the "HERE Document" like this:

while read a ; do echo "Line: $a" ; done <<HERE
123 ab c
def aldkfgjlaskdjf lkajsdlfkjlasdjf
asl;kdfj ;laksjdf;lkj asd;lf sdpf -aa8
HERE
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I'm familiar with this its just that I want to define my list prior to the for loop. –  Adam Gent May 21 '12 at 14:50
while read -r line
do
    var+=$line$'\n'
done <<EOF
foo bar
baz qux
EOF

while read -r line
do
    echo "[$line]"
done <<<"$var"

Why would you need to index arrays? You can append to arrays and iterate over them without using indices.

array+=(value)
for item in "${array[@]}"
do
    something with "$item"
done
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I did not know you could append to arrays thats why :) –  Adam Gent May 21 '12 at 14:51

There are better answers here, but you can also delimit the read on \n and temporarily change the variable to split on newlines instead of whitespace in the for loop using the IFS environment variable.

read -d \n -r VAR <<HERE
list item 1
list item 2
list item 3
HERE

IFS_BAK=$IFS
IFS="\n"
for a in $VAR; do echo $a; done
IFS=$IFS_BAK
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ahh the -d on read. I knew about IFS but no -d on read. –  Adam Gent May 21 '12 at 15:02

When it's fine for you to use a while loop instead of a for loop, you can make use of the while read construct and a "here document":

#!/bin/bash

while read LINE; do
    echo "${LINE}"
done << EOF
list item 1
list item 2
list item 3
EOF

ref: how does ` cat << EOF` work in bash?

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