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I have a table like the following in SQL Server 2008

  AMID                TierLevel
 --------            -------------
  999                 GOLD
  1000                SILVER   
  1000                GOLD
  1000                PLATINUM
  1000                BRONZE
  1001                GOLD
  1001                SILVER
  1002                SILVER
  1003                GOLD

Now I want to Update this table like the following

  AMID                TierLevel
 --------            -------------
  999                 GOLD
  1000               PLATINUM  
  1000               PLATINUM
  1000               PLATINUM
  1000               PLATINUM
  1001                GOLD
  1001                GOLD
  1002                SILVER
  1003                GOLD

Here the conditions are

  • I want unique Tier value for the same AMID, and the Tier values should be selected in priority base like

    1. PLATINUM
    2. GOLD
    3. SILVER
    4. BRONZE
  • It means if it is having the highest one present in its Tier values then select that. Like I shown in the second table, Platinum for 1000 and Gold for 1001..

please help me with this

Thanks,
Harry

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would do this using a temporary table to store the rank of each Tier:

DECLARE @Rank TABLE (ID INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, Name VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL)
INSERT @Rank VALUES (1, 'PLATINUM'), (2, 'GOLD'), (3, 'SILVER'), (4, 'BRONZE')

;WITH T AS
(   SELECT  AMID, TierLevel, MIN(ID) OVER(PARTITION BY AMID) [MinID]
    FROM    #T
            INNER JOIN @Rank
                ON Name = TierLevel
)
UPDATE  T
SET     TierLevel = Name
FROM    T
        INNER JOIN @Rank
            ON ID = MinID
WHERE   TierLevel <> Name

This was done using the following sample data:

CREATE TABLE #T (AMID INT, TierLevel VARCHAR(10))
INSERT #T VALUES 
    (999, 'GOLD'), 
    (1000, 'SILVER'), 
    (1000, 'GOLD'), 
    (1000, 'PLATINUM'), 
    (1000, 'BRONZE'),
    (1001, 'GOLD'),
    (1001, 'SILVER'),
    (1002, 'SILVER'),
    (1003, 'GOLD')
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Gareth, this one is working gr8 for my table, and I would like to ask you a small question here. will this updates all the rows in the table or updates only where the value need to be changed?? because it is showing 190k rows updated from my table of 200k rows..!! –  harry May 21 '12 at 16:25
1  
You could easily add a WHERE clause, e.g. WHERE TierLevel <> Name... –  Aaron Bertrand May 21 '12 at 16:28
    
It would have updated all rows, so it sounds like you have some rows that are not either BRONZE, SILVER, GOLD or Platinum! As Aaron has suggested, I have added a where clause to update statement. –  GarethD May 21 '12 at 16:32
1  
@GarethD no, I don't think there are "some rows that are not either bronze, silver, gold or platinum" - the update statement without the where clause simply didn't care, if an AMID had 800 rows that were all silver, it would update them all to silver even though they shouldn't be candidates for update, since they already contained the right value. –  Aaron Bertrand May 22 '12 at 11:49
    
@AaronBertrand exactly, without the where clause all rows would be updated whether it was necessary or not. So if the table contains 200k rows, and without the where clause only 190k were updated, what happened to the other 10K rows? It would suggest they were exluded by the INNER JOIN ON Name = TierLevel, meaning an AMID that is not Bronze, Silver, Gold or Platinum. This is the only way I can see the row count could be reduced without the where clause (remember I did not add this to the answer until after the comment regarding the number of rows updated). –  GarethD May 22 '12 at 22:06
DECLARE @amid TABLE (Amid INT, TierLevel VARCHAR(20));

INSERT @amid VALUES
(999 ,'GOLD'),
(1000,'SILVER'), (1000,'GOLD'),   (1000,'PLATINUM'), (1000,'BRONZE'),
(1001,'GOLD'),   (1001,'SILVER'),
(1002,'SILVER'), (1003,'GOLD');

;WITH [priority](r, n) AS
(
    SELECT 1, 'PLATINUM'
    UNION ALL SELECT 2, 'GOLD'
    UNION ALL SELECT 3, 'SILVER'
    UNION ALL SELECT 4, 'BRONZE'
),
per_amid(amid, h) AS
(
    SELECT a.amid, MIN(p.r)
      FROM @amid AS a
      INNER JOIN [priority] AS p
      ON a.TierLevel = p.n
      GROUP BY a.amid
)
UPDATE a
  SET TierLevel = p.n
  FROM @amid AS a
  INNER JOIN per_amid AS pa
  ON a.Amid = pa.amid
  INNER JOIN [priority] AS p
  ON pa.h = p.r
  -- added where clause to address question brought up on other answer
  WHERE a.TierLevel <> p.n;

SELECT Amid, TierLevel FROM @amid;

Results:

Amid  TierLevel
----  ---------
999   GOLD
1000  PLATINUM
1000  PLATINUM
1000  PLATINUM
1000  PLATINUM
1001  GOLD
1001  GOLD
1002  SILVER
1003  GOLD
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Aaron, This one working gr8.:) –  harry May 21 '12 at 16:27
    
@harry so why did you accept it, then un-accept it, then accept the other answer that is only right because I helped out? –  Aaron Bertrand May 22 '12 at 11:46
    
Ouch..! sorry mate, I thought I can mark both as answers, first I clicked on yours and then the other, might it is keeping the second one.. and I didn't noticed it.. :( –  harry May 22 '12 at 13:32

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