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I'm using a native c++ dll out of an Java application with the JNA framework. I have a problem with a function invocation. Perhaps I'm not allocating the memory properly? I have no opinion, what to try next. I'm not getting any more information helping me out of the documentation and forum threads. I hope you can give me a hint, would be nice.

I want to call a native function (in example FooInterface). This function takes a structure TNativeFoo as input and output parameter. The structure TNativeFoo contains a Double**/Double[][] data. This field could be seen as a multidimensional array, but the first dimension has only the lenght 1. So its more a pointer pointing to a double array with the size Items.

There is also a StringArray in the structure (char**/String[]) with the length StringsCount, this is irrellevant, because it isn't used. I mention it because I'm not sure if the error has something to do with this. Below is the definition made for the native dll and the structure.

 public interface Foodll extends StdCallLibrary {

    Foodll INSTANCE = (Foodll) Native.loadLibrary("foodll.dll", Foodll.class);

    public static class TNativeFoo extends com.sun.jna.Structure {

    public TNativeFoo (){
            super();
            setAlignType(ALIGN_NONE);
        }
        public TNativeFoo(com.sun.jna.Pointer pointer,int offset) {
            super();
            setAlignType(ALIGN_NONE);
            useMemory(pointer,offset);
            read();
        }
        public TNativeFoo(TNativeFoo struct) {
        this(struct.getPointer(),0);
    }

        public static class ByReference extends TNativeFoo implements com.sun.jna.Structure.ByReference {
            ByReference() {}
            ByReference(TNativeFoo struct){super(struct.getPointer(),0);}
        }
        public static class ByValue extends TNativeFoo implements com.sun.jna.Structure.ByValue {
            ByValue() {}
            ByValue(TNativeFoo struct){super(struct.getPointer(),0);}
        }

        public PointerByReference Data;
        public NativeLong Items;
        public PointerByReference IrrelevantStringArray;
        public NativeLong StringsCounts = new NativeLong(0);
    }

    NativeLong FooInterface(TNativeFoo input, TNativeFoo output);
}

For the call to the function I try to allocate the memory on the native heap and write the data to it. After writing the data to the native heap like in the example I could read it like I did in the example with alternative 2 (I tried this without invoking the native function, and directly from the inputFoo). Invoking the native function like in the example below throws me a fatal exception.

Invocation:

public class FooInvocationClass
{
    public static FooInvocationMethod(double[] fooData)
    {

                Foodll foodllJnaLib = Foodll.INSTANCE;

                Foodll.TNativeFoo outputFoo = new Foodll.TNativeFoo();
                Foodll.TNativeFoo inputFoo = new Foodll.TNativeFoo();

        //Writing input data to the native heap
                Memory dataPointer = new Memory (fooData.length * Double.SIZE);
                dataPointer.write(0, fooData, 0, fooData.length);

                inputFoo.Data = new PointerByReference();
                inputFoo.Data.setValue(dataPointer);

                outputProfile.Data = new PointerByReference();
                inputFoo.Items = outputFoo.Items = new NativeLong(fooData.length);

        //Setting some irrelevant StringArray Parameters
                inputFoo.IrrelevantStringArray = outputFoo.IrrelevantStringArray = new PointerByReference();
                inputFoo.StringsCounts = outputFoo.StringsCounts = new NativeLong(0);


        //Invocation
        foodllJnaLib.FooInterface(inputFoo, outputFoo);

        //Reading Output
                Pointer outputFooDataPointer = outputFoo.Data.getValue();

        //Reading Output alternative  1
                Double[] outDataAlt1 = outputFooDataPointer.getDoubleArray(0, outputFoo.items);

        //Reading Output alternative  2
                Double[] outDataAlt2 = new Double[outputFoo.items];
                for (int x = 0; x < outputFoo.items; x += 1)
                {
                    outDataAlt2[x] = outputFooDataPointer.getDouble(x * 8);
                }
        }
}

Exception:

# A fatal error has been detected by the Java Runtime Environment:
#
#  Internal Error (0x0), pid=5904, tid=220
#
# JRE version: 7.0_04-b22
# Java VM: Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (23.0-b21 mixed mode, sharing windows-x86 )
# Problematic frame:
# C  [KERNELBASE.dll+0xb9bc]  RaiseException+0x58
#
# Failed to write core dump. Minidumps are not enabled by default on client versions of Windows
#
# An error report file with more information is saved as:
# E:\Programme\apache-tomcat-7.0.27\bin\hs_err_pid5904.log
#

I also could imagine that there is a problem with the 32bit JVM and native code running on a 64bit system. I had installed a 32bit JVM on my 64-bit system as I was struckeling with a problem JNA "didn't find the native dlls".

Edit:

I found a mistake I made, I looked in the wrong Structure definition, which looks the same, but isn't. So I have to change my question.

But also I made my question was wrong, I tried the suggestions you all made. They helped me understand the topic, and I tried them after I found out about the right structure definition. Thank you for them.

But the Exception stays the same. Perhaps I have more than one error in the code. So here my question again, hopefully now correct and with more Information than before. Had to Foo a few things (in respect to the company), but the semantic stays the same.

I do not really have the h-files or the source code. I came into the Project late and I'm only working on it parttime. Someone else was programming the native calls in C++/CLI and it worked. So I have attached the code below. Below the c++/CLI codes is the changed Java-Code.

c++/CLI:

typedef void (__stdcall *TFooInterface) (
   LONGLONG *APrgId,
   void *input,
   void *output,
   double value,
   HANDLE AAppHandle,
   HANDLE AProgessBar,
   char *AText, 
   char **ReturnText
   );

//-APrgID is a ID, which tells the Method, what type of processing it should do.
//-The void Pointers both take a TNativeFOO Structure. One is for the input, the other one is for the output.
//-The double-value is a Parameter for the algorithm.
//-The Handle Parameters are for a programm, the dll was created for. They give status about the processing or something like that. We now use the dll in an other context, so they aren't needed anymore.
//-char *AText amd. char **ReturnText are, also not needed anymore. They are for exception handling as far as I know. We handle the Exception in the new Context more general.

typedef struct {
   double         *Data;
   long           Items;
   unsigned char  *String;
   long           StringCounts;
   double         Value1, Value2;
   char           *FileName;
   char           *DataObject;
   char           *Comment;
   bool           Valid;
} TNativeFoo;

//-*Data is a double Array holding the data to process in TFooInterface
//-Items is the lenght of Data
//-*String and StringCounts are not needed anymore, because the dll is used in another way. I can't tell what it is for.
//-Value1, Value2 are Parameters used in the algorithm
//-FileName is for storing the result. Isn't used.
//-DataObject, Comment is also never used. I can't tell what it is for.
//-Valid is a success-flag of the algorithm.

void FooClass::FooIt(double[] FooData, HMODULE hFooLib)
{

    TNativeFoo Input, Output; //Declaration of the Structures   
    LONGLONG PrgID;
    LONGLONG ID;
    double value;

    double[] OutputData = new double[FooData.length];
    ID =-35547318716283305;

    //setting up the Structures 

    memset(&Input, 0, sizeof(TNativeFoo));
    memset(&Output, 0, sizeof(TNativeFoo));

    Output.Data = new double[FooData.length];
    Input.Data =  &(FooData[0]);
    Input.Items = Output.Items = FooData.length;
    Input.Value1 = Output.Value1 = 1.3;
    Input.Value2 = Output.Value2 = 2.3;
    Input.Valid = Output.Valid = true;

    FooInterface = (TFooInterface) GetProcAddress(hFooLib, "FooInterface");
    FooInterface(&ID, &Input, &Output, value, 0, 0, "", NULL);

    for (long i=0; i<Output.Items; i++)
    {
        OutputData[i]= Output.Data[i];
    }

    ...

}

The Java Definitions:

public interface Foodll extends StdCallLibrary {

    Foodll INSTANCE = (Foodll) Native.loadLibrary("foodll.dll", Foodll.class);

    //Structure
    public static class TNativeFoo extends com.sun.jna.Structure {

        public TNativeFoo(){
            setAlignType(Structure.ALIGN_NONE);
        }
        public TNativeFoo(com.sun.jna.Pointer pointer, int offset) {
            super(pointer.share(offset));
            setAlignType(Structure.ALIGN_NONE); //Tested all align-types. I was told this is the one used by the dlls
            read();
        }
        public TNativeFoo(TNativeProfile struct) {
            super(struct.getPointer());
            setAlignType(Structure.ALIGN_NONE); //Tested all align-types. I was told this is the one used by the dlls
            read();
        }
        public static class ByReference extends TNativeFoo implements com.sun.jna.Structure.ByReference {
            ByReference() {}
            ByReferenceTNativeFoo struct){super(struct.getPointer(),0);}
        }
       public static class ByValue extends TNativeFoo implements com.sun.jna.Structure.ByValue {
            ByValue() {}
            ByValueTNativeFoo struct){super(struct.getPointer(),0);}
        }
        public Pointer Data;
        public double[] getData() {
            if (this.Data == null) return null;
            return this.Data.getDoubleArray(0, Items.intValue());
        }
        public void setData(double[] data) {
            if (this.Data == null) {
                this.Data = new Memory(data.length * 8);
            }
            this.Data.write(0, data, 0, data.length);
        }
        public NativeLong Items;
        public String String;
        public NativeLong StringCounts = new NativeLong(0);
        public double Value1;
        public double Value2;
        public String FileName;
        public String DataObject;
        public String Comment;
        public boolean Valid;
    }

    NativeLong FooInterface(DoubleByReference prgid, TNativeFoo input, TNativeFoo output, double value, Pointer aAppHandle, Pointer aProgessBar, String AText, String[] ReturnText);
}

Java-Invocation:

public class FooInvocationClass
{
        public static FooInvocationMethod(double[] fooData, ID)
        {
                Foodll foodllJnaLib = Foodll.INSTANCE;

                Foodll.TNativeFoo outputFoo = new Foodll.TNativeFoo();
                Foodll.TNativeFoo inputFoo = new Foodll.TNativeFoo();

                inputFoo.setData(fooData);
                outputFoo.setData(new double[fooData.length]);
                inputFoo.Items = outputFoo.Items = new NativeLong(fooData.length);

                inputFoo.String = outputFoo.String = "";
                inputFoo.StringCounts = outputFoo.StringCounts = new NativeLong(0);
                inputFoo.Value1 = outputFoo.Value1 = 0.1;
                inputFoo.Value2 = outputFoo.Value2 = 0.3;

                Double ID =-35547318716283305;
                double value = 0.025;
                impDriveFiltJnaLib.ProfileFilterInterface(new DoubleByReference(ID), input, output, value, null, null, null, null);

                Double[] outDataAlt1 = outputFoo.getDate();
        }
}

Edit 2

Exception has changed after I resolved a Problem with a file error in the dll. The dll had to be copied again. That resolved a problem the dll couldn't be loaded.

#
# A fatal error has been detected by the Java Runtime Environment:
#
#  EXCEPTION_ACCESS_VIOLATION (0xc0000005) at pc=0x027047b8, pid=800, tid=7584
#
# JRE version: 7.0_04-b22
# Java VM: Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (23.0-b21 mixed mode, sharing windows-x86 )
# Problematic frame:
# C  [FooDll.dll+0x47b8]  FooInterface+0x2288
#
# Failed to write core dump. Minidumps are not enabled by default on client versions of Windows
#
# An error report file with more information is saved as:
# E:\Programme\apache-tomcat-7.0.27\bin\hs_err_pid800.log
#
# If you would like to submit a bug report, please visit:
#   http://bugreport.sun.com/bugreport/crash.jsp
# The crash happened outside the Java Virtual Machine in native code.
# See problematic frame for where to report the bug.
#
share|improve this question
    
Include corresponding native declarations that you're trying to map. –  technomage May 23 '12 at 11:17
    
I found a mistake I made, I looked in the wrong Structure "Information/Documentation", which looks the same. The data field isn't really a Double**-Pointer it is only a Double*-Pointer. So the Question will change dramaticly. Should I Edit and change the whole text, and add the things I let out. Or should I write a new question and Reference the Questions. –  GiCo May 24 '12 at 13:39
    
Add a new section under an "EDIT" header, and add a note about the edit to the very top of the question. –  technomage May 24 '12 at 15:01
    
OK I edited the Question. Thx. –  GiCo May 26 '12 at 10:54
    
Any unused pointer fields should be Pointer, rather than String. If you're not certain the underlying data is an initialized C string (or NULL), you're better off not having JNA try to parse it as a String, which will likely result in a crash if it's not a C string. –  technomage May 26 '12 at 12:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why are you using no alignment for your Structure? That's the most likely cause of your crash. Verify that the field offsets in Java (Structure.toString() will tell you) are the same as those in native code.

PointerByReference is intended to be passed to a function where the callee writes the value of a pointer into the address passed by the caller. While your usage is technically correct, it actually obfuscates your actual intent.

If your structure contains a pointer of any kind, you should start with a type mapping of Pointer, and thereafter adjust the type mapping as needed. PointerByReference is never appropriate as a structure field.

   public static class TNativeFoo extends com.sun.jna.Structure {

       public TNativeFoo (){ }
       public TNativeFoo(com.sun.jna.Pointer pointer, int offset) {
            super(pointer.share(offset));
            read();
        }
        public TNativeFoo(TNativeFoo struct) {
            super(struct.getPointer());
            read();
        }
        // NOTE: use Java conventions for field names, please
        private Pointer buffer;
        public Pointer data = new Memory(Pointer.SIZE);
        public NativeLong items;
        public Pointer irrelevantStringArray = new Memory(Pointer.SIZE);
        public NativeLong stringsCounts = new NativeLong(0);

        public double[] getData() { 
            Pointer p = data.getPointer(0);
            if (p == null) return null;
            return p.getDoubleArray(items.intValue());  
        }
        public void setData(double[] data) {
            Pointer p = this.data.getPointer(0);
            if (p == null) {
               p = buffer = new Memory(data.length * 8);    
               this.data.setPointer(0, buffer);
            }
            p.write(0, data, 0, data.length);
        }
    }

    NativeLong FooInterface(TNativeFoo input, TNativeFoo output);
}

Note that Double.SIZE is the size of a double in bits, not bytes, so you're allocating 8 times the size you actually need.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help! I will try it this way and come back! –  GiCo May 21 '12 at 16:15
    
Thanks for your help! ... I tried it this way, that didn't solve the Problem. Perhaps I'm closer now. I also tried all Alignments, also no change. Perhaps there is a problem with a unused Handle-Parameter, which I excluded from the Method call. Is it OK to declare a Handle as Pointer in the function-interface definition. I invoke the function later with null. The TNativeFoo-Parameter is a void* Pointer in the c++ definition, but I believe its OK to declare and pass this in as TNativeFoo. Do you have any further suggestions?Or good reading.I didn't find so much explanations about JNA. –  GiCo May 22 '12 at 23:14
    
Really? JNA documents quite extensively its usage in the project website, the JavaDoc, and the included examples and unit tests. Under the section on support, it clearly indicates that when asking for help, you should provide both the native and (proposed) Java declarations for all relevant data structures and method signatures. Without a side by side comparison, it's impossible to say whether you're not simply trivially leaving something out. Are you using the proper calling convention? Do your native/Java structure sizes match? –  technomage May 23 '12 at 11:15
    
I read the JavaDoc. But there is for me something missing to get the details right (I'm more a managed-guy). The API-Doc is good to have, but the one sentence explanations there seem made for c++ guys. Perhaps it is not feasible to explain it for a none c++-Guy. Because it is a one time thing for me and I do not really think I could learn c++ in detail for it. Also this would be the right way to do it. I would need more examples. –  GiCo May 24 '12 at 13:56
    
The JNA documentation includes descriptions of proper structure and structure field mappings in both the github site pages and the JavaDoc overview page. Feel free to make suggestions on the JNA project itself (either via the mailing list (groups.google.com/group/jna-users) or by opening a github issue (github.com/twall/jna/issues) on the project). –  technomage May 24 '12 at 15:05

I have two suggestions:-

  1. You should try using jnaerator for generating java code for the given c/c++ header. (Which will be a very good base to start).

  2. Depending on the environment your native double/float size will be different from Java double/float. i.e native double might be equal to Java float. So you need to check this also.

So, you need to do bit of analysis of your own with different structure combinations to get what exactly native wants. If you don't pass exact then it will result in crash.

Kindly post your answer also.

share|improve this answer
    
#2 is extremely, extremely unlikely. I can't think of any modern CPU that doesn't follow the IEEE-754 spec (well IBM has their own format, but they support IEEE-754 as well). –  Voo May 21 '12 at 16:10
    
Also thank you for your answer. I don't have the header file *g. Came to the project a few days ago and it seems the header file doesn't exist. I will post the answer if I get it working –  GiCo May 21 '12 at 16:25
    
If you don't have a header file, how do you know what the structure looks like in the first place? –  technomage May 23 '12 at 11:16
    
The Author of the dll implemented a use-demo. –  GiCo May 24 '12 at 13:05
    
Presumably even the use demo has a definition for the structure, right? –  technomage May 24 '12 at 15:02

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