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How do you determine equality for two JavaScript objects?

What is the best way to compare Objects in JavaScript?

Example:

var user1 = {name : "nerd", org: "dev"};
var user2 = {name : "nerd", org: "dev"};
var eq = user1 == user2;
alert(eq); // gives false

I know that "Two objects are equal if they refer to the exact same Object", but is there a way to check it another way??

Using this way works for me.....but is it the only possibility?

var eq = Object.toJSON(user1) == Object.toJSON(user2);
alert(eq); // gives true
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Michael Myers Aug 29 '11 at 16:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
First URL passed away... –  NAVEED Jun 17 '11 at 6:43
47  
Why doesn't the "closed" message provide a link to the duplicate question? I don't want to dig through all Michael Myers questions t find it; seems like it be easy to put in a link to the actual question. –  Elisabeth Dec 10 '12 at 19:58
1  
I added an answer for it stackoverflow.com/a/16788517/1414809 –  Ebrahim Byagowi May 28 '13 at 11:36
    
I tinkered a bit on the topic and devised a flexible solution to the problem stamat.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/javascript-object-comparison –  stamat Jun 22 '13 at 19:17
    
testing for (deep) equality is quite a difficult thing to get right. head over to github.com/loveencounterflow/jseq to see a test suite of popular equal() implementations that already covers many edge cases. the discussion in the docs is also quite thorough. –  flow Jun 5 at 11:43

10 Answers 10

up vote 249 down vote accepted

Unfortunately there is no perfect way, unless you use _proto_ recursively and access all non-enumerable properties, but this works in Firefox only.

So the best I can do is to guess usage scenarios.


1) Fast and limited.

Works when you have simple JSON-style objects without methods and DOM nodes inside:

 JSON.stringify(obj1) === JSON.stringify(obj2) 

The ORDER of the properties IS IMPORTANT, so this method will return false for following objects:

 x = {a: 1, b: 2};
 y = {b: 2, a: 1};

2) Slow and more generic.

Compares objects without digging into prototypes, then compares properties' projections recursively, and also compares constructors.

This is almost correct algorithm:

function deepCompare () {
  var i, l, leftChain, rightChain;

  function compare2Objects (x, y) {
    var p;

    // remember that NaN === NaN returns false
    // and isNaN(undefined) returns true
    if (isNaN(x) && isNaN(y) && typeof x === 'number' && typeof y === 'number') {
         return true;
    }

    // Compare primitives and functions.     
    // Check if both arguments link to the same object.
    // Especially useful on step when comparing prototypes
    if (x === y) {
        return true;
    }

    // Works in case when functions are created in constructor.
    // Comparing dates is a common scenario. Another built-ins?
    // We can even handle functions passed across iframes
    if ((typeof x === 'function' && typeof y === 'function') ||
       (x instanceof Date && y instanceof Date) ||
       (x instanceof RegExp && y instanceof RegExp) ||
       (x instanceof String && y instanceof String) ||
       (x instanceof Number && y instanceof Number)) {
        return x.toString() === y.toString();
    }

    // At last checking prototypes as good a we can
    if (!(x instanceof Object && y instanceof Object)) {
        return false;
    }

    if (x.isPrototypeOf(y) || y.isPrototypeOf(x)) {
        return false;
    }

    if (x.constructor !== y.constructor) {
        return false;
    }

    if (x.prototype !== y.prototype) {
        return false;
    }

    // Check for infinitive linking loops
    if (leftChain.indexOf(x) > -1 || rightChain.indexOf(y) > -1) {
         return false;
    }

    // Quick checking of one object beeing a subset of another.
    // todo: cache the structure of arguments[0] for performance
    for (p in y) {
        if (y.hasOwnProperty(p) !== x.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
            return false;
        }
        else if (typeof y[p] !== typeof x[p]) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    for (p in x) {
        if (y.hasOwnProperty(p) !== x.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
            return false;
        }
        else if (typeof y[p] !== typeof x[p]) {
            return false;
        }

        switch (typeof (x[p])) {
            case 'object':
            case 'function':

                leftChain.push(x);
                rightChain.push(y);

                if (!compare2Objects (x[p], y[p])) {
                    return false;
                }

                leftChain.pop();
                rightChain.pop();
                break;

            default:
                if (x[p] !== y[p]) {
                    return false;
                }
                break;
        }
    }

    return true;
  }

  if (arguments.length < 1) {
    return true; //Die silently? Don't know how to handle such case, please help...
    // throw "Need two or more arguments to compare";
  }

  for (i = 1, l = arguments.length; i < l; i++) {

      leftChain = []; //Todo: this can be cached
      rightChain = [];

      if (!compare2Objects(arguments[0], arguments[i])) {
          return false;
      }
  }

  return true;
}

Known issues (well, they have very low priority, probably you'll never notice them):

  • objects with different prototype structure but same projection
  • functions may have identical text but refer to different closures

Tests: passes tests are from How to determine equality for two JavaScript objects?.

share|improve this answer
8  
The check against undefined will fail for when a property is defined but set to the undefined value. Use the in operator instead of typeof to avoid this: p in x. Also comparing functions by string value is highly unreliable. Apart from the usual reasons that function decomposition fails, it's also very common to have two functions with the same code but very different behaviour due to closures. eg. any function created by jQuery's $.proxy or Prototype's Function#bind. I'd just stick with comparing function identity. –  bobince Sep 24 '10 at 23:22
13  
I think you should use identical comparison operator: ===, cause { a: 5 } and { a: "5.0" } aren't equal, or are they? –  Crozin Oct 3 '10 at 20:14
5  
If the object tree contains a loop, this will result in a stack overflow. –  sibidiba May 19 '11 at 12:13
21  
You shouldn't extend Object.prototype if it can be avoided. It causes ugly problems such as breaking for(var key in someObject) if there's no if(!someObject.hasOwnProperty(key)) continue; inside that loop. –  ThiefMaster Jun 2 '11 at 21:44
9  
the function comparison is wrong: functions may have identical text but refer to different closures. Better to just return this[p] === x[p]. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 19 '11 at 12:37

Here is my commented solution (gory details after the code):

Object.equals = function( x, y ) {
  if ( x === y ) return true;
    // if both x and y are null or undefined and exactly the same

  if ( ! ( x instanceof Object ) || ! ( y instanceof Object ) ) return false;
    // if they are not strictly equal, they both need to be Objects

  if ( x.constructor !== y.constructor ) return false;
    // they must have the exact same prototype chain, the closest we can do is
    // test there constructor.

  for ( var p in x ) {
    if ( ! x.hasOwnProperty( p ) ) continue;
      // other properties were tested using x.constructor === y.constructor

    if ( ! y.hasOwnProperty( p ) ) return false;
      // allows to compare x[ p ] and y[ p ] when set to undefined

    if ( x[ p ] === y[ p ] ) continue;
      // if they have the same strict value or identity then they are equal

    if ( typeof( x[ p ] ) !== "object" ) return false;
      // Numbers, Strings, Functions, Booleans must be strictly equal

    if ( ! Object.equals( x[ p ],  y[ p ] ) ) return false;
      // Objects and Arrays must be tested recursively
  }

  for ( p in y ) {
    if ( y.hasOwnProperty( p ) && ! x.hasOwnProperty( p ) ) return false;
      // allows x[ p ] to be set to undefined
  }
  return true;
}

In developing this solution, I took a particular look at corner cases, efficiency, yet trying to yield a simple solution that works, hopefully with some elegance. JavaScript allows both null and undefined properties and objects have prototypes chains that can lead to very different behaviors if not checked.

First I have chosen to extend Object instead of Object.prototype, mostly because null could not be one of the objects of the comparison and that I believe that null should be a valid object to compare with another. There are also other legitimate concerns noted by others regarding the extension of Object.prototype regarding possible side effects on other's code.

Special care must taken to deal the possibility that JavaScript allows object properties can be set to undefined, i.e. there exists properties which values are set to undefined. The above solution verifies that both objects have the same properties set to undefined to report equality. This can only be accomplished by checking the existence of properties using Object.hasOwnProperty( property_name ). Also note that JSON.stringify() removes properties that are set to undefined, and that therefore comparisons using this form will ignore properties set to the value undefined.

Functions should be considered equal only if they share the same reference, not just the same code, because this would not take into account these functions prototype. So comparing the code string does not work to guaranty that they have the same prototype object.

The two objects should have the same prototype chain, not just the same properties. This can only be tested cross-browser by comparing the constructor of both objects for strict equality. ECMAScript 5 would allow to test their actual prototype using Object.getPrototypeOf(). Some web browsers also offer a __proto__ property that does the same thing. A possible improvement of the above code would allow to use one of these methods whenever available.

The use of strict comparisons is paramount here because 2 should not be considered equal to "2.0000", nor false should be considered equal to null, undefined, or 0.

Efficiency considerations lead me to compare for equality of properties as soon as possible. Then, only if that failed, look for the typeof these properties. The speed boost could be significant on large objects with lots of scalar properties.

No more that two loops are required, the first to check properties from the left object, the second to check properties from the right and verify only existence (not value), to catch these properties which are defined with the undefined value.

Overall this code handles most corner cases in only 16 lines of code (without comments).

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm using this function in my code. Just found out that it runs out of stack when testing cyclical objects. I didn't implement it because I don't need it as of now, but wanted to let you know. jsfiddle.net/mendesjuan/uKtEy –  Juan Mendes Jun 21 '12 at 18:14
    
Actually, I found a method to detect if an object is cyclical. Added it to another fiddle, jsfiddle.net/mendesjuan/uKtEy/1 Now the function throws an error if an object is cyclical, which is a shame because your original version did work for cyclical objects, as long as the two object were pointing to the same object jsfiddle.net/mendesjuan/uKtEy/2 –  Juan Mendes Jun 21 '12 at 18:24
    
@JuanMendes, if you need a version that tests cyclical objects, a much more efficient way would be to merge the cyclical test into Object:equals(), in order to test only one property right before the recursion: updated fiddle here jsfiddle.net/uKtEy/3 –  Jean Vincent Jul 9 '12 at 19:29
    
Will it handle NaN? –  Andreas Köberle May 7 '13 at 6:41
1  
@JeanVincent Simple check against infinite recursion: Object.equals = function( x, y, depth ) { if (depth >= 10) return false; ... if ( ! Object.equals( x[ p ], y[ p ], (depth || 0) + 1 ) ) return false; .... –  Ivan Nikitin Oct 23 at 11:46

Certainly not the only way - you could prototype a method (against Object here but I certainly wouldn't suggest using Object for live code) to replicate C#/Java style comparison methods.

Edit, since a general example seems to be expected:

Object.prototype.equals = function(x)
{
    for(p in this)
    {
    	switch(typeof(this[p]))
    	{
    		case 'object':
    			if (!this[p].equals(x[p])) { return false }; break;
    		case 'function':
    			if (typeof(x[p])=='undefined' || (p != 'equals' && this[p].toString() != x[p].toString())) { return false; }; break;
    		default:
    			if (this[p] != x[p]) { return false; }
    	}
    }

    for(p in x)
    {
    	if(typeof(this[p])=='undefined') {return false;}
    }

    return true;
}

Note that testing methods with toString() is absolutely not good enough but a method which would be acceptable is very hard because of the problem of whitespace having meaning or not, never mind synonym methods and methods producing the same result with different implementations. And the problems of prototyping against Object in general.

share|improve this answer
    
thx, and same question as above...does this work with object methods? –  spankmaster79 Jul 1 '09 at 12:51
    
Yes and no. It doesn't as written because the two methods will be different object instances (where not prototyped), but you could adapt this to a determine the methods are equivalent (though that's not straightforward). –  annakata Jul 1 '09 at 13:08
1  
You're only looping through "this" elements. Wouldn't your equals method return true when "this" is a subset of a larger "x"? Shouldn't you also add a for (p in x) loop? –  Nosredna Jul 1 '09 at 15:48
    
The code is buggy. o1.equals(o2) returns true if all properties of o1 are equal to those of o2. But if o2 also has other properties that o1 does not have, the objects may be incorrectly marked as equal. –  molf Jul 1 '09 at 15:49
    
Additionally, it would benefit from recursive comparison, using equals() internally to compare properties that are objects. –  molf Jul 1 '09 at 15:50

The following algorithm will deal with self-referential data structures, numbers, strings, dates, and of course plain nested javascript objects:

Objects are considered equivalent when

  • They are exactly equal per === (String and Number are unwrapped first to ensure 42 is equivalent to Number(42))
  • or they are both dates and have the same valueOf()
  • or they are both of the same type and not null and...
    • they are not objects and are equal per == (catches numbers/strings/booleans)
    • or, ignoring properties with undefined value they have the same properties all of which are considered recursively equivalent.

Functions are not considered identical by function text. This test is insufficient because functions may have differing closures. Functions are only considered equal if === says so (but you could easily extend that equivalent relation should you choose to do so).

Infinite loops, potentially caused by circular datastructures, are avoided. When areEquivalent attempts to disprove equality and recurses into an object's properties to do so, it keeps track of the objects for which this sub-comparison is needed. If equality can be disproved, then some reachable property path differs between the objects, and then there must be a shortest such reachable path, and that shortest reachable path cannot contain cycles present in both paths; i.e. it is OK to assume equality when recursively comparing objects. The assumption is stored in a property areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34, which is deleted after use, but if the object graph already contains such a property, behavior is undefined. The use of such a marker property is necessary because javascript doesn't support dictionaries using arbitrary objects as keys.

function unwrapStringOrNumber(obj) {
    return (obj instanceof Number || obj instanceof String 
            ? obj.valueOf() 
            : obj);
}
function areEquivalent(a, b) {
    a = unwrapStringOrNumber(a);
    b = unwrapStringOrNumber(b);
    if (a === b) return true; //e.g. a and b both null
    if (a === null || b === null || typeof (a) !== typeof (b)) return false;
    if (a instanceof Date) 
        return b instanceof Date && a.valueOf() === b.valueOf();
    if (typeof (a) !== "object") 
        return a == b; //for boolean, number, string, xml

    var newA = (a.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34 === undefined),
        newB = (b.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34 === undefined);
    try {
        if (newA) a.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34 = [];
        else if (a.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34.some(
            function (other) { return other === b; })) return true;
        if (newB) b.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34 = [];
        else if (b.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34.some(
            function (other) { return other === a; })) return true;
        a.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34.push(b);
        b.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34.push(a);

        var tmp = {};
        for (var prop in a) 
            if(prop != "areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34") 
                tmp[prop] = null;
        for (var prop in b) 
            if (prop != "areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34") 
                tmp[prop] = null;

        for (var prop in tmp) 
            if (!areEquivalent(a[prop], b[prop]))
                return false;
        return true;
    } finally {
        if (newA) delete a.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34;
        if (newB) delete b.areEquivalent_Eq_91_2_34;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for humorist reference to "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" ultimate answer to all questions. –  Jean Vincent Jul 15 '11 at 9:05
    
-1, you could use an array to record recursion chain and then prevent loops –  Dan Jun 26 '13 at 10:56
1  
@Dan merely preventing infinite recursion isn't enough: you still want to know whether the cyclical objects are equivalent or not. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 27 '13 at 14:04

I wrote this piece of code for object comparison, and it seems to work. check the assertions:


function countProps(obj) {
    var count = 0;
    for (k in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(k)) {
            count++;
        }
    }
    return count;
};

function objectEquals(v1, v2) {

    if (typeof(v1) !== typeof(v2)) {
        return false;
    }

    if (typeof(v1) === "function") {
        return v1.toString() === v2.toString();
    }

    if (v1 instanceof Object && v2 instanceof Object) {
        if (countProps(v1) !== countProps(v2)) {
            return false;
        }
        var r = true;
        for (k in v1) {
            r = objectEquals(v1[k], v2[k]);
            if (!r) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    } else {
        return v1 === v2;
    }
}

assert.isTrue(objectEquals(null,null));
assert.isFalse(objectEquals(null,undefined));

assert.isTrue(objectEquals("hi","hi"));
assert.isTrue(objectEquals(5,5));
assert.isFalse(objectEquals(5,10));

assert.isTrue(objectEquals([],[]));
assert.isTrue(objectEquals([1,2],[1,2]));
assert.isFalse(objectEquals([1,2],[2,1]));
assert.isFalse(objectEquals([1,2],[1,2,3]));

assert.isTrue(objectEquals({},{}));
assert.isTrue(objectEquals({a:1,b:2},{a:1,b:2}));
assert.isTrue(objectEquals({a:1,b:2},{b:2,a:1}));
assert.isFalse(objectEquals({a:1,b:2},{a:1,b:3}));

assert.isTrue(objectEquals({1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:26}},{1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:26}}));
assert.isFalse(objectEquals({1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:26}},{1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:27}}));

assert.isTrue(objectEquals(function(x){return x;},function(x){return x;}));
assert.isFalse(objectEquals(function(x){return x;},function(y){return y+2;}));
share|improve this answer
1  
from sabadell to the whole world. –  ZaoTaoBao Sep 12 '13 at 10:48

Here is my version, pretty much stuff from this thread is integrated (same counts for the test cases):

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "equals", {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function (obj) {
        var p;
        if (this === obj) {
            return true;
        }

        // some checks for native types first

        // function and sring
        if (typeof(this) === "function" || typeof(this) === "string" || this instanceof String) { 
            return this.toString() === obj.toString();
        }

        // number
        if (this instanceof Number || typeof(this) === "number") {
            if (obj instanceof Number || typeof(obj) === "number") {
                return this.valueOf() === obj.valueOf();
            }
            return false;
        }

        // null.equals(null) and undefined.equals(undefined) do not inherit from the 
        // Object.prototype so we can return false when they are passed as obj
        if (typeof(this) !== typeof(obj) || obj === null || typeof(obj) === "undefined") {
            return false;
        }

        function sort (o) {
            var result = {};

            if (typeof o !== "object") {
                return o;
            }

            Object.keys(o).sort().forEach(function (key) {
                result[key] = sort(o[key]);
            });

            return result;
        }

        if (typeof(this) === "object") {
            if (Array.isArray(this)) { // check on arrays
                return JSON.stringify(this) === JSON.stringify(obj);                
            } else { // anyway objects
                for (p in this) {
                    if (typeof(this[p]) !== typeof(obj[p])) {
                        return false;
                    }
                    if ((this[p] === null) !== (obj[p] === null)) {
                        return false;
                    }
                    switch (typeof(this[p])) {
                    case 'undefined':
                        if (typeof(obj[p]) !== 'undefined') {
                            return false;
                        }
                        break;
                    case 'object':
                        if (this[p] !== null 
                                && obj[p] !== null 
                                && (this[p].constructor.toString() !== obj[p].constructor.toString() 
                                        || !this[p].equals(obj[p]))) {
                            return false;
                        }
                        break;
                    case 'function':
                        if (this[p].toString() !== obj[p].toString()) {
                            return false;
                        }
                        break;
                    default:
                        if (this[p] !== obj[p]) {
                            return false;
                        }
                    }
                };

            }
        }

        // at least check them with JSON
        return JSON.stringify(sort(this)) === JSON.stringify(sort(obj));
    }
});

Here is my TestCase:

    assertFalse({}.equals(null));
    assertFalse({}.equals(undefined));

    assertTrue("String", "hi".equals("hi"));
    assertTrue("Number", new Number(5).equals(5));
    assertFalse("Number", new Number(5).equals(10));
    assertFalse("Number+String", new Number(1).equals("1"));

    assertTrue([].equals([]));
    assertTrue([1,2].equals([1,2]));
    assertFalse([1,2].equals([2,1]));
    assertFalse([1,2].equals([1,2,3]));

    assertTrue(new Date("2011-03-31").equals(new Date("2011-03-31")));
    assertFalse(new Date("2011-03-31").equals(new Date("1970-01-01")));

    assertTrue({}.equals({}));
    assertTrue({a:1,b:2}.equals({a:1,b:2}));
    assertTrue({a:1,b:2}.equals({b:2,a:1}));
    assertFalse({a:1,b:2}.equals({a:1,b:3}));

    assertTrue({1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:26}}.equals({1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:26}}));
    assertFalse({1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:26}}.equals({1:{name:"mhc",age:28}, 2:{name:"arb",age:27}}));

    assertTrue("Function", (function(x){return x;}).equals(function(x){return x;}));
    assertFalse("Function", (function(x){return x;}).equals(function(y){return y+2;}));

    var a = {a: 'text', b:[0,1]};
    var b = {a: 'text', b:[0,1]};
    var c = {a: 'text', b: 0};
    var d = {a: 'text', b: false};
    var e = {a: 'text', b:[1,0]};
    var f = {a: 'text', b:[1,0], f: function(){ this.f = this.b; }};
    var g = {a: 'text', b:[1,0], f: function(){ this.f = this.b; }};
    var h = {a: 'text', b:[1,0], f: function(){ this.a = this.b; }};
    var i = {
        a: 'text',
        c: {
            b: [1, 0],
            f: function(){
                this.a = this.b;
            }
        }
    };
    var j = {
        a: 'text',
        c: {
            b: [1, 0],
            f: function(){
                this.a = this.b;
            }
        }
    };
    var k = {a: 'text', b: null};
    var l = {a: 'text', b: undefined};

    assertTrue(a.equals(b));
    assertFalse(a.equals(c));
    assertFalse(c.equals(d));
    assertFalse(a.equals(e));
    assertTrue(f.equals(g));
    assertFalse(h.equals(g));
    assertTrue(i.equals(j));
    assertFalse(d.equals(k));
    assertFalse(k.equals(l));
share|improve this answer
    
JSON.stringify() removes properties that are set to undefined, and that therefore comparisons using this form will ignore properties set to the value undefined: assertFalse([1,2,null].equals([1,2,undefined])). –  Jean Vincent Jul 9 '12 at 20:20
    
You are stringifying arrays, but array can have complex objects inside –  Dan Jun 26 '13 at 7:37
  Utils.compareObjects = function(o1, o2){
    for(var p in o1){
        if(o1.hasOwnProperty(p)){
            if(o1[p] !== o2[p]){
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    for(var p in o2){
        if(o2.hasOwnProperty(p)){
            if(o1[p] !== o2[p]){
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
};

Simple way to compare ONE-LEVEL only objects.

share|improve this answer

I have modified a bit the code above. for me 0 !== false and null !== undefined. If you do not need such strict check remove one "=" sign in "this[p] !== x[p]" inside the code.

Object.prototype.equals = function(x){
    for (var p in this) {
        if(typeof(this[p]) !== typeof(x[p])) return false;
        if((this[p]===null) !== (x[p]===null)) return false;
        switch (typeof(this[p])) {
            case 'undefined':
                if (typeof(x[p]) != 'undefined') return false;
                break;
            case 'object':
                if(this[p]!==null && x[p]!==null && (this[p].constructor.toString() !== x[p].constructor.toString() || !this[p].equals(x[p]))) return false;
                break;
            case 'function':
                if (p != 'equals' && this[p].toString() != x[p].toString()) return false;
                break;
            default:
                if (this[p] !== x[p]) return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Then I have tested it with next objects:

var a = {a: 'text', b:[0,1]};
var b = {a: 'text', b:[0,1]};
var c = {a: 'text', b: 0};
var d = {a: 'text', b: false};
var e = {a: 'text', b:[1,0]};
var f = {a: 'text', b:[1,0], f: function(){ this.f = this.b; }};
var g = {a: 'text', b:[1,0], f: function(){ this.f = this.b; }};
var h = {a: 'text', b:[1,0], f: function(){ this.a = this.b; }};
var i = {
    a: 'text',
    c: {
        b: [1, 0],
        f: function(){
            this.a = this.b;
        }
    }
};
var j = {
    a: 'text',
    c: {
        b: [1, 0],
        f: function(){
            this.a = this.b;
        }
    }
};
var k = {a: 'text', b: null};
var l = {a: 'text', b: undefined};

a==b expected true; returned true

a==c expected false; returned false

c==d expected false; returned false

a==e expected false; returned false

f==g expected true; returned true

h==g expected false; returned false

i==j expected true; returned true

d==k expected false; returned false

k==l expected false; returned false

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for testing the constructor or sub objects. But why not testing that of the main object? And why not testing functions by reference instead of comparing strings using toString(), this is slow and unaccurate. –  Jean Vincent Jul 15 '11 at 8:56

If you work without the JSON library, maybe this will help you out:

Object.prototype.equals = function(b) {
    var a = this;
    for(i in a) {
        if(typeof b[i] == 'undefined') {
            return false;
        }
        if(typeof b[i] == 'object') {
            if(!b[i].equals(a[i])) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        if(b[i] != a[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    for(i in b) {
        if(typeof a[i] == 'undefined') {
            return false;
        }
        if(typeof a[i] == 'object') {
            if(!a[i].equals(b[i])) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        if(a[i] != b[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

var a = {foo:'bar', bar: {blub:'bla'}};
var b = {foo:'bar', bar: {blub:'blob'}};
alert(a.equals(b)); // alert's a false
share|improve this answer

if you want to check for methods explicitly you can use the method.toSource() or method.toString() methods.

share|improve this answer
    
really not good enough for the reasons I described –  annakata Jul 1 '09 at 16:31
    
So you'd spin through the elements of the object, and check what the types are, then use toSource() or toString() when you find a function? –  Nosredna Jul 1 '09 at 19:38
    
Nosredna, yes. That would give you the actual text of the function. annakata, I don't understand what's not good enough and what you are actually trying to do. Could you elaborate a bit? –  rudasn Jul 2 '09 at 15:54
1  
@snz3 - there's a serious problem with whitespace, dropped semi-colons and braces and similar syntax differences which may or may not have an impact, and are hard to determine without parsing i.e. decoupling from a raw string format. There's also the problem of fluctuating state and prototyping. Basically strings are not good enough at capturing the state of two objects. –  annakata Jul 20 '09 at 21:55

protected by Rajaprabhu Aravindasamy Jul 6 at 16:11

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